Applying Value Sensitive Design Principles to User Engagement

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Presentation given by Katey Deeny 3/25/12 at IA Summit 12 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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  • Hi Katey,

    I am lecturing in Australia on Ethics and Technology. We are teaching Value Sensitive Design and I came across your slides. I really like the presentation and would like to know if it would be ok by you if I present your slides to the class?

    Kind Regards

    Simon
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  • User Experience is based on a memory of an event. We cannot control the context in which our designs are used, and therefore we cannot truly design an experience. We can, however, design for engagement. Engagement can be measured both quantitatively and qualitatively, which can often open doors with other stakeholders such as the value people and the feasibility people.
  • User Experience is based on a memory of an event. We cannot control the context in which our designs are used, and therefore we cannot truly design an experience. We can, however, design for engagement. Engagement can be measured both quantitatively and qualitatively, which can often open doors with other stakeholders such as the value people and the feasibility people.
  • User Experience is based on a memory of an event. We cannot control the context in which our designs are used, and therefore we cannot truly design an experience. We can, however, design for engagement. Engagement can be measured both quantitatively and qualitatively, which can often open doors with other stakeholders such as the value people and the feasibility people.
  • Humans are inherently good. They want to do the right thing. Virtually any situation where you are problem solving with design, you are going to run into value judgments. Value judgments can make us feel uncomfortable
  • Applying Value Sensitive Design Principles to User Engagement

    1. 1. APPLYING VALUE-SENSITIVE DESIGNPRINCIPLES TO USER ENGAGEMENTKatey DeenyExperience Director, WebMD Health Services@followsprocess
    2. 2. THESE IDEAS ARE BASED ONTHE WORK OF OTHERS. BATYA FRIEDMAN PETER KAHN vsdesign.org#VSD @followsprocess
    3. 3. WhyUSER ENGAGEMENT
    4. 4. VISUAL COMMUNICATIONENGAGEMENT LAYERFEATURE SETDATASUPPORTING PROCESSES#VSD @followsprocess
    5. 5. USER ENGAGEMENT CAN BEMEASURED.USER EXPERIENCE, NOT SOMUCH.#VSD @followsprocess
    6. 6. FINDING OUT WHAT THEVALUES ARE OF YOURINTENDED AUDIENCES GIVESYOU A CHANCE TO ENGAGETHEM IN MEANINGFUL WAYS.#VSD @followsprocess
    7. 7. WhyVALUES
    8. 8. VALUES ARE DIFFICULT.#VSD @followsprocess
    9. 9. PICK FIVE…Ambition Friendship Justice PatienceCompassion Generosity Kindness PerseveranceCourage Gratitude Leadership PrivacyCreativity Honesty Learning RespectDedication Hope Loyalty ResponsibilityDetermination Humility Mentoring SecurityEducation Humor Motivation SharingEquality Ingenuity Opportunity SustainabilityExcellence Inspiration Optimism TrustForgiveness Integrity Passion Unity
    10. 10. FROM THOSE 5, ELIMINATE 4…Ambition Friendship Justice PatienceCompassion Generosity Kindness PerseveranceCourage Gratitude Leadership PrivacyCreativity Honesty Learning RespectDedication Hope Loyalty ResponsibilityDetermination Humility Mentoring SecurityEducation Humor Motivation SharingEquality Ingenuity Opportunity SustainabilityExcellence Inspiration Optimism TrustForgiveness Integrity Passion Unity
    11. 11. VALUES ARE CONTEXTUAL.#VSD @followsprocess
    12. 12. RECOGNIZING TENSIONSBETWEEN VALUES HELPS US TOSURFACE POTENTIAL PITFALLS &PROBLEMS AS PART OF ANOVERALL DESIGN STRATEGY.#VSD @followsprocess
    13. 13. TENSIONS.#VSD @followsprocess
    14. 14. HowMETHOD
    15. 15. APPLYING VALUE SENSITIVEDESIGN METHODS TO YOURPRACTICE HELPS CREATEEFFECTIVE USER ENGAGEMENTTHROUGH DESIGN.#VSD @followsprocess
    16. 16. #VSD @followsprocess
    17. 17. “HOMELESS HOTSPOTS:THE BEST, WORST, SMARTEST,DUMBEST PART OF SXSW” -  Laura June theverge.com#VSD @followsprocess
    18. 18. I’M [FIRST NAME],A 4G HOTSPOTSMS HH [FIRST NAME]TO 25827 FOR ACCESSwww.homelesshotspots.org#VSD @followsprocess
    19. 19. #VSD @followsprocess
    20. 20. 1 - VALUE, TECHNOLOGY, CONTEXT OF USE2 - IDENTIFY DIRECT & INDIRECTSTAKEHOLDERS3 - IDENTIFY BENEFITS & HARMS FOR EACHSTAKEHOLDER GROUP4 - MAP BENEFITS & HARMS ONTOCORRESPONDING VALUES5 - IDENTIFY POTENTIAL VALUE CONFLICTS6 - INTEGRATE VALUE CONSIDERATIONS
    21. 21. VALUE, TECHNOLOGY, CONTEXT OF USEVALUE:EmpowermentTECHNOLOGY:Wireless accessCONTEXT OF USE:Homelessness…SXSW#VSD @followsprocess
    22. 22. IDENTIFY DIRECT & INDIRECT STAKEHOLDERSDIRECT STAKEHOLDERS:Homeless ParticipantsSXSW AttendeesFront Steps – homeless shelterBBH – ad agency#VSD @followsprocess
    23. 23. IDENTIFY DIRECT & INDIRECT STAKEHOLDERSINDIRECT STAKEHOLDERS:Austin communityHomeless peopleAdvocacy groupsWireless provider#VSD @followsprocess
    24. 24. IDENTIFY BENEFITS & HARMS FOR EACHSTAKEHOLDER GROUPHomeless Participants Benefits: Working with the public for 4 days Harms: No ongoing supportSXSW Attendees Benefits: Wireless service on demand Harms: Discomfort with a social problem#VSD @followsprocess
    25. 25. IDENTIFY BENEFITS & HARMS FOR EACHSTAKEHOLDER GROUPFront Steps – homeless shelter Benefits: Helping tenants earn money Harms: No infrastructure to continue the programBBH – ad agency Benefits: Media attention, brand awareness Harms: Criticism#VSD @followsprocess
    26. 26. IDENTIFY BENEFITS & HARMS FOR EACHSTAKEHOLDER GROUPAustin community Benefits: Positive interactions with homeless Harms: Negative attention about problemHomeless Benefits: Creates awareness Harms: Does not create sustainable change#VSD @followsprocess
    27. 27. IDENTIFY BENEFITS & HARMS FOR EACHSTAKEHOLDER GROUPAdvocacy Groups Benefits: Inspires new programs Harms: Highlights complexity of problemWireless Carrier Benefits: Brand equity Harms: Potential negative brand association#VSD @followsprocess
    28. 28. MAP BENEFITS & HARMSONTO CORRESPONDING VALUESHomeless Participants Benefits: Working with the public for 4 days Engagement, Earning, Humanization Stability Harms: No ongoing supportSXSW Attendees Benefits: Wireless service on demand Access Harms: Discomfort with a social problem Comfort#VSD @followsprocess
    29. 29. MAP BENEFITS & HARMSONTO CORRESPONDING VALUESFront Steps – homeless shelter Benefits: Helping tenants earn money Empowerment, Philanthropy Maintainability Harms: No infrastructure to continue the programBBH – ad agency Benefits: Media attention, brand awareness Fame Harms: Criticism Notoriety#VSD @followsprocess
    30. 30. MAP BENEFITS & HARMSONTO CORRESPONDING VALUESAustin community Benefits: Positive interactions with homeless Change Status Quo Harms: Negative attention about problemHomeless Benefits: Creates awareness Hope Harms: Does not create sustainable change Sustainability#VSD @followsprocess
    31. 31. MAP BENEFITS & HARMSONTO CORRESPONDING VALUESAdvocacy Groups Benefits: Inspires new programs Innovation Encouragement Harms: Highlights complexity of problemWireless Carrier Benefits: Brand equity Recognition Harms: Potential negative brand association Reputation#VSD @followsprocess
    32. 32. IDENTIFY POTENTIAL VALUE CONFLICTSAccess InnovationChange MaintainabilityComfort NotorietyEarning PhilanthropyEmpowerment RecognitionEncouragement ReputationEngagement StabilityFame Status QuoHope SustainabilityHumanization#VSD @followsprocess
    33. 33. INTEGRATE VALUE CONSIDERATIONS#VSD @followsprocess
    34. 34. WhatTRY THIS AT HOME
    35. 35. #VSD @followsprocess
    36. 36. THANK YOU.Katey DeenyExperience Director, WebMD Health Services@followsprocess
    37. 37. QuestionHOW MIGHT YOU USE VALUE-SENSITIVE DESIGN TO HELPENGAGE USERS MOREEFFECTIVELY?  #VSD @followsprocess

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