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Using Technology in the Higher Ed Classroom
 

Using Technology in the Higher Ed Classroom

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Should we teach with technology? Why? How are you using technology in the classroom?

Should we teach with technology? Why? How are you using technology in the classroom?

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  •  I created a series of content lectures which introduce each philosopher and his/her key theoretical concepts and arguments. These are animated powerpoint presentations with my voice narration. And they look a little like (Pollan lecture)Course tour videos—these are screen-capture videos where I record my screen while showing students how to perform tasks and navigate the course generally.Technically still a medium of content delivery: The students read primary texts in Environmental philosophy.In every module, I offer video clips by or about the philosophers: for instance, here is a Ted lecture by Michael Pollan.I use documentaries and clips about major environmental issues and eventsAnd Informational websites, like this debate site on animal experimentationAnd, I always try to include funny clips whenever possible—because I believe that learning about philosophy should be serious—but not grave.—so, here I have Jon Stewart and John Hodgman explaining the World Bank in 4 minutes.
  • Each module was designed to culminate in Case Study workshops, where students took a particular case of moral dilemma, and applied the theories they had been learning.So, after module one on humans concepts of nature, and our sense of our relationship to nature, students worked through case study workshops on koko the gorilla to explore our ideas about language, thought and consciousness; and one on religion and nature, where they watch a PBS documentary exploring the extent to which religion encourages environmental awareness and action. In Modules four and five, we explore how moral theorists try to determine principles and criteria for marking intrinsic value over instrumental value. If a being or something has intrinsic value—value beyond its usefulness to us—then we are obligated to consider its needs and interests. Therefore this question is a key one in environmental theory. What characteristics mark the difference between a being with intrinsic value (and thus due moral consideration) and a being with instrumental value (and thus can be used by us according to our needs, without owing it itself moral consideration). Is the criteria Reason and Consciousness? Is it Sentience? Is it being an “experiencing subject of a life,” is it a larger matter of “it is part of a larger ecological system, etc” Students apply these theories are they grapple with classic dilemmas in animal rights and eco-system welfare, vegetarianism, experiementation, wilderness management hunting, and so forth. This section also including one of my favorite workshops: a tv episode from 30 Days, where an avid hunter agrees to live with a PETA family for 30 days. I love this episode, because George the hunter is an amazingly thoughtful and open-minded and thoughtful person, and the family that he stays with is too. Their exchanges are theoretically meaningful, deeply respectful, And serve as a model to students of how one can approach exploring issues with those who disagree (even fundamentally). Module Six asks students to apply theories of environmental justice—global justice and domestic—to environmental issues that primarily are concerned with our obligations to our fellow humans: issues of water rights and access to water, the genetic modification of foods, and agribusiness generally, as well as a case study on the moral permissability of civil disobedience – through looking at University of utah student Tim DeChristopher’s act of civil disobedience during an auctioning of Southern Utah lands for drilling rights.
  • Each module was designed to culminate in Case Study workshops, where students took a particular case of moral dilemma, and applied the theories they had been learning.So, after module one on humans concepts of nature, and our sense of our relationship to nature, students worked through case study workshops on koko the gorilla to explore our ideas about language, thought and consciousness; and one on religion and nature, where they watch a PBS documentary exploring the extent to which religion encourages environmental awareness and action. In Modules four and five, we explore how moral theorists try to determine principles and criteria for marking intrinsic value over instrumental value. If a being or something has intrinsic value—value beyond its usefulness to us—then we are obligated to consider its needs and interests. Therefore this question is a key one in environmental theory. What characteristics mark the difference between a being with intrinsic value (and thus due moral consideration) and a being with instrumental value (and thus can be used by us according to our needs, without owing it itself moral consideration). Is the criteria Reason and Consciousness? Is it Sentience? Is it being an “experiencing subject of a life,” is it a larger matter of “it is part of a larger ecological system, etc” Students apply these theories are they grapple with classic dilemmas in animal rights and eco-system welfare, vegetarianism, experiementation, wilderness management hunting, and so forth. This section also including one of my favorite workshops: a tv episode from 30 Days, where an avid hunter agrees to live with a PETA family for 30 days. I love this episode, because George the hunter is an amazingly thoughtful and open-minded and thoughtful person, and the family that he stays with is too. Their exchanges are theoretically meaningful, deeply respectful, And serve as a model to students of how one can approach exploring issues with those who disagree (even fundamentally). Module Six asks students to apply theories of environmental justice—global justice and domestic—to environmental issues that primarily are concerned with our obligations to our fellow humans: issues of water rights and access to water, the genetic modification of foods, and agribusiness generally, as well as a case study on the moral permissability of civil disobedience – through looking at University of utah student Tim DeChristopher’s act of civil disobedience during an auctioning of Southern Utah lands for drilling rights.

Using Technology in the Higher Ed Classroom Using Technology in the Higher Ed Classroom Presentation Transcript

  • Using Technology Effectively in the Onsite, Online, and Blended Class
    Kateri DrexlerKeys to Online LearningTwitter: KateriDrexBlog: kateridrexler.comemail: kateri@montrose.net
  • The Networked Context in Which People are Living
    Over 50% of the world’s population is under 30 years old.
    96% of people under 30 have joined a social network.
    YouTube is the 2nd largest search engine in the world.
    We no longer search for the news, the news finds us.
  • The Networked Context in Which People are Living
    18 year olds have played 10,000 hours of video games.
    There are 200,000,000 blogs.
    It is estimated that mobile phones will overtake PCs for Internet access by 2013.
    Generation Y and Z consider email old school technology.
  • The Cost of Digital Exclusion
    80% of companies use social media for recruitment.
    77% of Fortune 500 companies did not give job seekers a chance to respond offline to job offers in 2010.
    75% of employers are asking for better information literacy skills for new hires.
  • How Technology Can Be Used
    Lesson Presentation
    Collaboration
    Interaction
    Storytelling:
    YouTube Videos
    Movies
    Animations
    Podcasts
    Audio
    Virtual Classroom
    Mind Mapping
    Flipped Classroom
    Slide Share
    Participation:
    Gaming
    Twitter
    Learning Objects
    Video
    Animations
    Avatars/3D
    Clickers
    Questions
    SmartBoards
    Discussions and Group Work:
    Social networking
    Blogs
    Twitter
    Crowdsourcing
    Google Docs
    Wikis
  • The Flipped Classroom
  • Free Media Tools
    Animated Movies
    www.Xtranormal.com
    Voki
    www.voki.com
    Podcasting
    www.podomatic.com
  • Free Audio Tools
    • Vocaroo – http://www.vocaroo.com/
    Record voices and email them – need microphone either built in or separate
    • Audacity – http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
    Record and edit in numerous formats
  • Free Audio Books
    • LibriVox - http://librivox.org/
    Free audiobooks in the public domain that are read by volunteers
    • Project Gutenburg - http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page
    Books that are no longer copyright protected – has section where books can be read aloud
    • Free Classic Audio Books http://freeclassicaudiobooks.com/
    Downloadable classic books
  • Free Presentation Tools
    Flash Card Machine - http://www.flashcardmachine.com/
    Create web-based flashcards to study with text and pictures
    Slideshare - http://www.slideshare.net/
    Create presentations with slides or browse others
  • Free Diagram Tools
    Bubbl.us
    Mind mapping tool
    yEd –
    www.yworks.com/en/products_yed_about.html
    Diagrams
  • Free Collaboration Tools
    Google Docs – http://www.google.com/google-d-s/documents/
    Take notes, collaborate with peers, online word processing
    Twitter– Twitter.com
  • Multimedia Delivery and Learner Support
    Lectures, Videos, Weblinks, and more
    I can honestly say that from the first module I was hooked and fascinated at how my opinions of things changed the more I learned in this class. I think that this online class was a perfect way combining lecture with discussions with video clips. I could not think of any better way to do it.
  • Student Engagement
    Case Study Workshops
  • Student Engagement
    Case Study Workshops
    I found myself looking deeper into issues that I had previously been interested in… It was amazing to see how I was able to see alternative sides to issues, and through discussion and study, refine my position on them, and not always in the way I thought I would
  • My StudentSuccess Lab
  • www.youtube.com/user/finishstrong247
    MySearchLab
    MyFoundationsLab
  • Instructor Resource Center
    Downloads: IM
    Powerpoints
    Test Banks
    More
    E-book
    Assessments:
    LASSI, Noel Levitz/RMS, Robbins Self Assessment Library, and READI
    Faculty Training:
    Videos and Online
    Training and Support
  • Using Technology Effectively in the Onsite, Online, and Blended Class
    Kateri DrexlerKeys to Online LearningTwitter: KateriDrexBlog: kateridrexler.comemail: kateri@montrose.net