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Learn how to motivate and inspire your students and set them up for a successful online educational experience.

Learn how to motivate and inspire your students and set them up for a successful online educational experience.

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  • Discussion: How is it advantageous to access the content you need when you need it? How might that be a disadvantage?How can there be high quality interaction without being face-to-face?
  • Online courses can be impersonal, disconnected, and unfulfilling—FictionOnline classes are easier than onsite classes –FictionOnline instructors are less attentive than onsite instructors. --FictionOnline courses are more expensive than onsite courses. –FictionOnline courses fit better into a busier schedule.--FactYou can participate in an online class from anywhere –FictionEducation standards are lower for online courses.  Fiction
  • Instructor: help students define these terms
  • •Course presentations. Some online courses will offer textual explanations of the material organized by week or unit, with separately accessed resources. Others might furnish an integrated course presentation leading the user through the material in a series of screens, with resources such as videos or interactive exercises incorporated into the presentation. Some other courses will simply direct students to access specific information on their own. Pay special attention to material that is within a course presentation—it is usually the most important information. •Textbooks and other hard copy materials. Your textbook may be a printed document, an online version accessed through an e-reader program, or a file (such as a .pdf or Microsoft Word document) that can be downloaded and either printed or read onscreen. •Video lectures. Some online courses include video lectures by an instructor, created specifically for the course or taped from previous presentations.•Animations and interactive media. Because of the effort and cost involved in creating animations or interactive media, they are likely centered around the most important concepts in the course. •Podcasts. A method of publishing audio and video programs via the Internet that lets users subscribe to and automatically download new files, podcasting in online courses might offer full, unabridged audio recordings of the online presentation. •Web links. Your course might also provide additional Web links added by the instructor that lead to external websites, videos, and other resources.
  • See the following slides for more details on each
  • Instructor: talk about how one bad experience may be inaccurate but can have a lasting impact if people are unaware.
  • Ask yourself—What can be good about this? In a bad situation. Explain how important thoughts areIn class exercise—students stand up and hold one arm out in front of them. They say out loud “I’m a bad person” while another student applies pressure to their arm, moving it down. Repeat with the phrase “I’m a good person” and see the difference. The arm almost always goes much further down in the first instance. This is how quick thoughts can impact the body and how we experience the world.
  • Ask yourself—What can be good about this? In a bad situation. Explain how important thoughts areIn class exercise—students stand up and hold one arm out in front of them. They say out loud “I’m a bad person” while another student applies pressure to their arm, moving it down. Repeat with the phrase “I’m a good person” and see the difference. The arm almost always goes much further down in the first instance. This is how quick thoughts can impact the body and how we experience the world.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2011, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Quick! , Ch01
      Logging in to Success
      Keys to Online Learning Quick
      Chapter 1
      1
    • 2. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Ideas Explored in Chapter 1
      What are some of the benefits and challenges of online learning? 
      What can I expect to find in an online course?
      What practices are important for succeeding in online courses?
      2
    • 3. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Benefits of Online Learning
      Flexible scheduling
      High-quality interaction  
      Interactivity with complex concepts
      Proactive users of technology
      3
    • 4. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Challenges of Online Learning
      Study skills, such as reading online, writing for an online audience, and building peer relationships are different
      The most important skill you can have is the ability to take charge of your own learning
      Successful online students tend to be self-starters and highly motivated to complete assignments and do well in these courses
      4
    • 5. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Understanding the Online Learning Environment: Fact or Fiction?  
      Online courses can be impersonal, disconnected, and unfulfilling. –Fact or Fiction?
      Online classes are easier than onsite classes. –Fact or Fiction?
      Online instructors are less attentive than onsite instructors.
      –Fact or Fiction? 
      Online courses are more expensive than onsite courses. –Fact or Fiction?
      Online courses fit better into a busier schedule. –Fact or Fiction?
      You can participate in an online class from anywhere.  –Fact or Fiction?
      Education standards are lower for online courses.  –Fact or Fiction?
      5
    • 6. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Types of Online Courses 
      6
    • 10. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Approaches to Presenting Contentin an Online Course
      Course presentations
      Textbooks and other hard copy materials
      Video lectures
      Animations and interactive media
      Podcasts
      Web links
      7
    • 11. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Types of Assignments in an Online Course
      Graded discussions
      Discussions are the most “visibility” you will have in the class. 
      Quizzes and exams
      Ungraded self-assessment
      Short written assignments
      Longer analysis papers
      Group projects
      Journals
      8
    • 12. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      A Learning Management System
      9
      Discussion Boards 
      Course Content
      Announcements
      LMS
      Gradebook
      Assignments and Assessments
      Dropbox/DocSharing
      Chat Room or Lounge
      Resources   
    • 13. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Practices of Successful Online Learners   
      Prepare for the Path Ahead
      Structure Your Schedule
      Set Priorities
      Develop Discipline and Accountability
      Foster Relationships
      Seek New Skills
      Manage Your Thoughts and Emotions
      Ask for Help 
         
      10
    • 14. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Prepare for the Path Ahead
      Read and understand the course catalog
      Read and understand your syllabus
      Review your main goal for your education daily
      Make a list of the courses in your program
      Make a schedule for when you will take each course
      11
    • 15. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Structure Your Schedule
      Put key dates from your syllabus in your schedule
      Keep a “to-do” list
      Log in to your course every day
      Use a calendar
      Participate!
      Take care of yourself
      12
    • 16. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Set Priorities
      Understand your values and how education fits in
      Make your course a priority
      Read success stories
      Visualize how your success will impact your future
      13
    • 17. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Develop Discipline and Accountability
      Plan extra time into your schedule
      Find someone to whom you can be accountable
      Implement the 10-minute rule
      There is perhaps no single greater habit for online success than becoming a self-starter and managing yourself.
      14
    • 18. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Foster Relationships 
      Be tolerant and polite
      Be cautious of language that could be misinterpreted
      Interact with your classmates as much as possible
      Value diversity
      Ask questions
      Prioritize relationships
      Show your classmates you value them
      Be open-minded
      Work through tensions
      15
    • 19. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Foster Relationships 
      Be aware of prejudice
      Prejudgments of others based on race, sexual orientation, disability, religion, etc.
      Influenced by family and culture, fear, and bad experiences
      Based on stereotypes
      Assumptions made, without proof or critical thinking, about the characteristics of a person or group
      Caused by a desire for patterns and logic, media, unwillingness to look deeper
      16
    • 20. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Seek New Skills
      What challenges you?
      Learn better reading, writing, and collaboration skills
      Apply what you have already learned to new learning
      Practice skills
      Apply new knowledge as soon as possible
      Get help right away if you need it!
      17
    • 21. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Manage Thoughts and Emotions
      Look out for negative thoughts
      “should,” “ought,” “have to,” “can’t,” “always,” and “never.”
      Challenge negative thoughts
      Replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts
      Take action!
      Focus on the positive
      Acknowledge fears
      Learn from mistakes and move on
      Find the good in any situation
      Spend time with positive people
      18
    • 22. ©Pearson Education, Inc. 2012, Carter, Bishop, & Kravits, Keys to Success: Building Creative, Analytical and Practical Skills, Ch01
      Ask for Help
      Know who to call and keep contact information handy
      Ask for help clearly
      If someone is unwilling to help, find someone else
      Lean on your classmates
      19