Bennett New Nation Study Guide

1,066 views

Published on

New Nation Study Guide by Bennett

Published in: Education
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,066
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Bennett New Nation Study Guide

  1. 1. New Nation Test Study Guide Bennett
  2. 2. What is the definition of the word precedent, and what are some examples of precedents George Washington and his cabinet set?
  3. 3. What is the definition of the word precedent, and what are some examples of precedents George Washington and his cabinet set? <ul><li>Precedent- An example that is set and followed in all similar situations </li></ul><ul><li>Precedents that George Washington and his Cabinet set </li></ul><ul><li>The Judiciary Act, the way to set up a court in America </li></ul><ul><li>The idea that the country should store its own money, not put it into private banks </li></ul><ul><li>The plan to use taxes to pay for a war, a tactic still used today </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is the definition of the word cabinet? Who are the members of George Washington’s cabinet?
  5. 5. What is the definition of the word cabinet? Who are the members of George Washington’s cabinet? <ul><li>Cabinet- a group of the President’s closest advisors, with titles like: </li></ul><ul><li>Secretary of Treasury </li></ul><ul><li>Attorney General </li></ul><ul><li>Secretary of State </li></ul><ul><li>Members of George Washington’s cabinet: </li></ul><ul><li>Alexander Hamilton </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Jefferson </li></ul><ul><li>Samuel Osgood </li></ul><ul><li>Henry Knox </li></ul><ul><li>Edmund Randolph </li></ul>
  6. 6. What was the idea of Judicial Review? Is this system still in effect today?
  7. 7. What was the idea of Judicial Review? Is this system still in effect today? <ul><li>Judicial Review was the idea that the Supreme Court of the United states has the power to review laws and declare them unconstitutional. </li></ul><ul><li>This system is still in effect today, used very often </li></ul>
  8. 8. In the young country, where did most of the people live? Why do you think most of the people have settled in this area?
  9. 9. In the young country, where did most of the people live? Why do you think most of the people have settled in this area? <ul><li>Most of the people, or 90% of the people lived east of the Appalachian Mountains, and 10% lived to the west. </li></ul><ul><li>Some reasons for this are: </li></ul><ul><li>People originally settled on the coast, so this is where people are generally staying. </li></ul><ul><li>There are Native Americans to the west of the Appalachian mountains, posing a threat to settlers. </li></ul><ul><li>East of the Appalachian mountains is the coastal area, which is optimal for trading with foreign countries across the Atlantic. </li></ul>
  10. 10. How did people get around in 1790? How did the transportation affect the location of our capital?
  11. 11. How did people get around in 1790? How did the transportation affect the location of our capital? <ul><li>In 1790, transportation was very slow as people were limited to horse and carriage as the fastest form of transportation. </li></ul><ul><li>Other forms of transportation were by boat and by foot. </li></ul><ul><li>This changed the location of our capital from New York City to Washington D.C. because it took too long for southerners to get to New York, therefore the capital needed to be moved closer. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Who controlled the land to the north, and how did they come to control this land? Why is this bad for America?
  13. 13. Who controlled the land to the north, and how did they come to control this land? Why is this bad for America? <ul><li>Britain controlled the land to the north of America, which they acquired by conquering France in the seven years war. </li></ul><ul><li>This is bad for America because the people they had just fought against for their independence were looming over their heads, completely able to invade the small country. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Who controlled the land to the west and south of America? Which important American trading port did they control?
  15. 15. Who controlled the land to the west and south of America? Which important American trading port did they control? <ul><li>Spain controlled the land to the south and west of America. </li></ul><ul><li>They also had control of the Port of New Orleans, a port that was important to American traders on the Mississippi River. </li></ul><ul><li>Spain can and did close this port to American ships. </li></ul><ul><li>Spain can impose a very high tax on American ships passing through this port. </li></ul><ul><li>When this port is closed, it can hurt many American citizens and hurt the American economy. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Who was the creator of the National Bank? What was his position in the original cabinet?
  17. 17. Who was the creator of the National Bank? What was his position in the original cabinet? <ul><li>The creator of the National Bank was Alexander Hamilton. </li></ul><ul><li>He created this bank to store the money that the government collected in taxes and to loan money out to people. </li></ul><ul><li>His position in George Washington’s cabinet was Secretary of Treasury. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexander Hamilton never became president because he was born in the Caribbean. </li></ul>
  18. 18. What President was elected by a unanimous vote? What were his ideas on foreign policy?
  19. 19. What President was elected by a unanimous vote? What were his ideas on foreign policy? <ul><li>The President that was elected by a unanimous vote was George Washington </li></ul><ul><li>His foreign policies mainly circulated around the French’s war on Europe and dealing with our neighbors </li></ul><ul><li>Proclamation of Neutrality - a document that says we will not get involved in France’s war. </li></ul><ul><li>Jay’s Treaty- a treaty that got Britain to pay for the impressments that they had made, and to remove their troops from America. </li></ul><ul><li>Pinckney's treaty- a treaty that made Spain reopen the port of New Orleans and to settle on the northern border of Florida. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Which member of George Washington’s cabinet was a strict constructionist? Who was his polar opposite?
  21. 21. Which member of George Washington’s cabinet was a strict constructionist? Who was his polar opposite? <ul><li>Thomas Jefferson was the strict constructionist, believing that the constitution should be interpreted exactly. </li></ul><ul><li>His opposite was a loose constructionist, who created the national bank and almost always disagreed with Thomas Jefferson on issues. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Who was the first Vice President of the United States? Did he have a lot of power during his Vice Presidency?
  23. 23. Who was the first Vice President of the United States? Did he have a lot of power during his Vice Presidency? <ul><li>The first Vice President of the United States was John Adams </li></ul><ul><li>He had very little power as Vice President </li></ul><ul><li>Was not allowed to participate in “cabinet-level” meetings with George Washington, Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson </li></ul><ul><li>He had MUCH less power than today’s Vice President </li></ul><ul><li>Today’s Vice President is considered to be at the same level as cabinet members </li></ul>
  24. 24. To whom did America owe money to? How did this affect George Washington’s decision on America’s lack of involvement on France’s war on Europe?
  25. 25. To whom did America owe money to? How did this affect George Washington’s decision on America’s lack of involvement on France’s war on Europe? <ul><li>America owed money to: </li></ul><ul><li>Britain </li></ul><ul><li>British businessmen </li></ul><ul><li>Other foreign countries like Spain and France </li></ul><ul><li>This affected George Washington’s decision because </li></ul><ul><li>We couldn’t fight Britain and Spain when we owed so much money to them </li></ul><ul><li>We couldn’t afford another war since there was so much debt incurred from the Revolutionary War </li></ul>
  26. 26. Why did the government owe money to its own citizens? How did it pay them back?
  27. 27. Why did the government owe money to its own citizens? How did it pay them back? <ul><li>The government owed money because the people had bought bonds to pay for the war and the government promised to pay them back </li></ul><ul><li>The government paid back the citizens by putting a tax on whiskey </li></ul><ul><li>The farmers who grew the rye to be made into whiskey had to pay the tax, not the people who bought the whiskey. </li></ul><ul><li>This hit Pennsylvania farmers extremely hard because they were the people who grew the rye for whiskey. </li></ul>
  28. 28. What does loose construction mean? How is the national bank an example of loose construction?
  29. 29. What does loose construction mean? How is the national bank an example of loose construction? <ul><li>Loose construction- the idea that you can adjust the rules to fit any given situation. </li></ul><ul><li>Alexander Hamilton was a loose constructionist. </li></ul><ul><li>National bank dilemma: </li></ul><ul><li>The constitution does not specifically state the federal government has the right to create a bank </li></ul><ul><li>Congress thought it was necessary to have a bank and it says in the constitution that Congress can do whatever is “necessary and proper” (Article 1 section 8) </li></ul><ul><li>Congress decided that the creators of the constitution could not have foreseen this problem so they can adjust the rules of the constitution for this dilemma. </li></ul>
  30. 30. What does strict construction mean? What would be a typical strict constructionist’s views on a law against email spam?
  31. 31. What does strict construction mean? What would be a typical strict constructionist’s views on a law against email spam? <ul><li>Strict construction- The rules are set and there is no way to bend them. </li></ul><ul><li>The federal government is not allowed to make email laws but the states are. </li></ul><ul><li>The power to make laws against spam is not specifically given to the federal government, therefore it is up to the states (10 th amendment) </li></ul>
  32. 32. Why did Alexander Hamilton believe we needed a national bank? Why did Thomas Jefferson think we didn’t need a national bank?
  33. 33. Why did Alexander Hamilton believe we needed a national bank? Why did Thomas Jefferson think we didn’t need a national bank? <ul><li>Alexander Hamilton thought that we needed a national bank because: </li></ul><ul><li>Store money collected through taxes </li></ul><ul><li>Help businesses by loaning money </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Jefferson thought that we didn’t need a national bank because: </li></ul><ul><li>It would give the federal government too much power </li></ul><ul><li>Money was already stored in private and state banks </li></ul>
  34. 34. When the national bank was created, what did it look like? How long did it last?
  35. 35. When the national bank was created, what did it look like? How long did it last? <ul><li>The national bank was an establishment that: </li></ul><ul><li>Was the same as Alexander Hamilton’s vision </li></ul><ul><li>Stored the money collected through taxes </li></ul><ul><li>Loaned money to businesses </li></ul><ul><li>It lasted for twenty years, and then was reviewed by Congress. </li></ul><ul><li>It continued for at least another twenty years, but is not in existence today </li></ul><ul><li>Has been replaced by the federal reserve, the U.S. mint, etc. </li></ul>
  36. 36. What other nation signed Jay’s Treaty with America? What were the contents of this treaty?
  37. 37. What other nation signed Jay’s Treaty with America? What were the contents of this treaty? <ul><li>Britain was the other country to sign Jay’s Treaty </li></ul><ul><li>There were many aspects of this treaty, for example: </li></ul><ul><li>Britain had to pay for all of the impressments or capture of American trading ships they had made. </li></ul><ul><li>Britain had to remove all troops from American soil </li></ul><ul><li>Britain must allow small trading ships trade certain items with the West Indies </li></ul><ul><li>Congress was not very satisfied with this treaty </li></ul>
  38. 38. What other nation signed Pinckney’s treaty with America? What were the contents of this treaty?
  39. 39. What other nation signed Pinckney’s treaty with America? What were the contents of this treaty? <ul><li>Spain was the other country to sign Pinckney’s treaty. </li></ul><ul><li>There were many aspects of this treaty, for example: </li></ul><ul><li>Spain had to reopen the port of New Orleans to American ships </li></ul><ul><li>America and Spain settled on the border between the southern border of America and the northern border Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Spain agreed to give American ships Right of Deposit in New Orleans (American ships weren’t taxed when they went through New Orleans) </li></ul><ul><li>Congress was very happy with this treaty </li></ul>
  40. 40. What were the instructions given to the citizens of the United States regarding France’s war on Europe? What were the punishments for anyone who goes against these instructions?
  41. 41. What were the instructions given to the citizens of the United States regarding France’s war on Europe? What were the punishments for anyone who goes against these instructions? <ul><li>The Proclamation of Neutrality says: </li></ul><ul><li>No citizen can illegally smuggle goods to France </li></ul><ul><li>Citizens cannot get involved in the war </li></ul><ul><li>The Punishments for someone who goes against these instructions are: </li></ul><ul><li>America will not protect you if another country catches you smuggling goods or getting involved in the war in some other way </li></ul><ul><li>Officers will prosecute you for getting involved in the war </li></ul>
  42. 42. Which states had the most slaves during George Washington’s presidency? Which states had the least? Why do you think this is true?
  43. 43. Which states had the most slaves during George Washington’s presidency? Which states had the least? Why do you think this is true? <ul><li>Virginia had the most slaves (+107,094) </li></ul><ul><li>MA,VT,NH and ME had the least slaves (-157) </li></ul><ul><li>Virginia had the most slaves because: </li></ul><ul><li>There were a lot of plantations </li></ul><ul><li>Many things grow there (cotton, tobacco) </li></ul><ul><li>New England had the least slaves because: </li></ul><ul><li>Different industries (fishing, shipbuilding) </li></ul>
  44. 44. What states had banned slavery by 1790? What states were “phasing out” slavery? What does it mean to “phase out” slavery?
  45. 45. What states had banned slavery by 1790? What states were “phasing out” slavery? What does it mean to “phase out” slavery? <ul><li>MA and VT had already banned slavery </li></ul><ul><li>The states that had begun to “phase out” slavery were PA, NH, CT, RI, NY, and NJ. </li></ul><ul><li>“Phasing out” slavery means to not free all of the slaves at once ,but to slowly end slavery. </li></ul><ul><li>No new slaves would be allowed </li></ul><ul><li>Slaves were eventually freed (Some were automatically freed on their 25 th birthday) </li></ul>
  46. 46. George Washington gave a lot of advice and warning in his farewell address. What are some examples of this advice?
  47. 47. George Washington gave a lot of advice and warning in his farewell address. What are some examples of this advice? <ul><li>Some pieces of advice that George Washington shared with the country during his farewell address are: </li></ul><ul><li>It is not okay to discriminate against other people based on their geographical location </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of the destructive actions of political parties </li></ul><ul><li>To make sure that one department of the government does not “trespass” another </li></ul><ul><li>Try not to accumulate debt </li></ul><ul><li>Look for peace and harmony with all </li></ul><ul><li>Steer clear of permanent alliances with any countries because they do not exist, no countries will be friends forever </li></ul>

×