AI Simulation Exercise – After Action Report Stung Treng Province, Cambodia, October 13-15, 2008, InSTEDD (Dec.8,2008)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

AI Simulation Exercise – After Action Report Stung Treng Province, Cambodia, October 13-15, 2008, InSTEDD (Dec.8,2008)

on

  • 3,712 views

On October 13-15, 2008, over 65 people gathered from around Cambodia to participate in a CDC-led avian influenza pandemic training and simulation exercise in the Stung Treng province. CDC provided the ...

On October 13-15, 2008, over 65 people gathered from around Cambodia to participate in a CDC-led avian influenza pandemic training and simulation exercise in the Stung Treng province. CDC provided the public health training and InSTEDD introduced and tested new uses of mobile phones that will help with pandemic preparedness and response.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,712
Views on SlideShare
3,685
Embed Views
27

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0

5 Embeds 27

http://instedd.org 17
http://taha.instedd.org 4
http://www.instedd.org 3
http://www.lmodules.com 2
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

AI Simulation Exercise – After Action Report Stung Treng Province, Cambodia, October 13-15, 2008, InSTEDD (Dec.8,2008) Document Transcript

  • 1. Workshop on Simulation Exercise for AI Focusing  on Information Technology  Stung Treng Province, Cambodia, October 13‐15, 2008 After Action Report    Taha A. Kass‐Hout, MD, MS  Draft of 12/04/2008  Our primary aim was to provide and test a prototype emergency response system based on open source  technologies that would strengthen the response capabilities of Rapid Response Teams (RRT), referral  hospital, first responders and local communities within the provinces, villages and communes in the  setting of an avian influenza pandemic. A series of user‐centered design sessions and training with the  MoH, RRT team and various community members were conducted before and during the exercise. More  specifically, participating RRT and hospitals needed to validate and get training on existing plans, and to  develop Pandemic Response Plans for their province, for effective communication prevention and  control of the spread of disease and leverage the open source tools we developed in‐country to help  them achieve this goal. 
  • 2.   Table of Contents  Introduction....................................................................................................................................................... 3  The Simulation Exercise ..................................................................................................................................... 3  The Situation.............................................................................................................................................................3  The Objective and Opportunity ................................................................................................................................4  The Approach............................................................................................................................................................4  The Exercise: Avian Flu Outbreak in 3 Villages on October 15, 2008 .......................................................................5  Pandemic Alert Period (WHO Pandemic Stages 3 and 4).....................................................................................5   Pandemic Alert Period (WHO Pandemic Stage 5) ................................................................................................5   Participants ..........................................................................................................................................................6  Participants Feedback .......................................................................................................................................10  Cell Phone Use ........................................................................................................................................................10  Using Geochat.........................................................................................................................................................11  Challenges and Opportunities............................................................................................................................11  Costs and sustainability......................................................................................................................................12  Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................13  Appendix I: Agenda...........................................................................................................................................14  Simulation Exercise for AI focusing on Information Technology, Sekong Star Hotel (Stung Treng), 13‐15 October,  2008 ........................................................................................................................................................................14  Appendix II: Strategic Opportunities..................................................................................................................15  Opportunities to Enhance Disease Detection and Response for Cambodia and the MBDS Region.......................15  Surveillance Data Storage and Management.....................................................................................................16   Direct Participation of Labs Laboratory .............................................................................................................17   Unstructured Text and RSS Feeds ......................................................................................................................17   Collaboration......................................................................................................................................................17  Analytics and Visualization.................................................................................................................................17  Appendix III: Mekong Region Geochat Coverage [to date] .................................................................................17  Page | 2
  • 3. Workshop on Simulation Exercise for AI Focusing on Information Technology: Stung Treng Province, Cambodia, October 13-15, 2008 Routine health facility based disease surveillance systems, such as those on which most MBDS countries  depend, could provide neither a complete nor a representative picture of health problems in the  communities. This is primarily due to the fact that patients who cannot get access to public health  facilities or who choose not to use them are not reported by these systems. In order to overcome this  limitation, we augment facility‐based health information systems with a community‐based approach  based upon a collaborative network of people involved in the systematic detection and reporting of  health‐related events from their  community. We tested this initial  capability (InSTEDD’s Geochat) in a cross‐ sector and cross‐province Avian Influenza  (AI) community simulation exercise in  Stung Treng province, Cambodia. This  collaborative effort was sponsored by  InSTEDD and conducted jointly with the  Stung Treng Provisional Health  Department (PHD), Cambodia CDC, and  Cambodia Ministry of Health (MoH.)  Introduction The Stung Treng province faces many health  problems and often relies on the public health system or its  community‐based organizations for help in lieu of medical  practitioners or clinics. It also turns to affordable cell phones in lieu  of landlines for mobility, and cost savings. Public health practitioners  and community practitioners who provide local services find ongoing  communication with individuals in communities of need, to be a  challenge. InSTEDD worked with Cambodia Ministry of Health,  Cambodia CDC, Stung Treng Provisional Health Department, local  health centers, and simulated participation of cross‐border officials  to help address this challenge using text‐messaging (SMS) as an  affordable means to improve outreach communication and  disseminate multi‐directional information among various agencies  and those in the field.  SE Asia Region (Source: Wikipedia) The Simulation Exercise   The Situation Public health officials are on alert because of increasing concerns about the prospect of  an influenza pandemic. Moreover, because of recent problems with the availability and strain‐specificity  of flu vaccines, as well as the rising specter of the avian flu, officials from Cambodia Ministry of Health  (MoH), CDC and Stung Treng Provisional Health Department (PHD) are alarmed about the potential  inability to prevent or contain a human pandemic once it erupts in a few villages. Cambodia MoH, in  coordination with Cambodia CDC, adopted and adapted the WHO Global pandemic preparedness plan  to prepare for, respond to, and contain an outbreak of pandemic flu. With a population of >100,000  (>25,000 in the city), and many more visiting the province each day, the Stung Treng province was the  focus of the exercise (Please see Appendix I for agenda). Furthermore, since Lao PDR became an ASEAN  member, many national roads have been renovated and/or constructed, with support from many  international donors. Geographical isolation, which has always been a characteristic of Lao PDR, is  Page | 3
  • 4. beginning to break down, affording both new potential and challenges for development, but also  increasing the likelihood of disease spread from Lao (Champasak) to Cambodia (Stung Treng).  The Objective and Opportunity With  InSTEDD as a sponsor and technical partner, the  Stung Treng Province took the lead in organizing an  intensive (2.5 days) coordinated exercise. The  scope of this government‐led exercise included the  execution of a WHO comprehensive plan to  evaluate pandemic influenza preventive measures  and avian flu preparedness for Cambodia.  InSTEDD's augmented this effort by facilitating  multi‐directional communication among entities  charged with preparedness and response in the  Stung Treng province, and the other six Cambodian  participating provinces.  Our primary aim was to provide and test a  prototype emergency response system based on  open source technologies that would strengthen  the response capabilities of Rapid Response Teams  (RRT), referral hospital, first responders and local  communities within the provinces, villages,  communes and cross‐border in the setting of an  avian influenza pandemic. A series of user‐ centered design sessions and training with the  MoH, RRT team and various community members  were conducted before and during the exercise.  More specifically, participating RRT and hospitals  WHO Pandemic Severity (Source: WHO) needed to validate and get training on existing  plans, and to develop Pandemic Response Plans for their province, for effective communication  prevention and control of the spread of disease and leverage the open source tools we developed in‐ country to help them achieve this goal.  The Approach In collaboration with CDC and the MoH, InSTEDD assembled a team of over 75  participants,  representing 7 provinces,  from various  governmental sectors  (e.g., RRTs, district and  provincial health  departments, local and  provincial government,  law enforcement) at  multiple levels to  participate in an Avian  AI Exercise Discussion Facilitated by Dr. Chan Vuthy, Chief, Surveillance Bureau, KH‐ Influenza (AI) exercise.  CDC, Cambodia  The AI exercise took  place October 13‐15, 2008 to collect communication protocol responses through an SMS channel.  Page | 4
  • 5. InSTEDD conducted on‐site training on using SMS on October 13 and October 14, 2008 and carried out  the simulation exercise during the morning of October 15, 2008. The Stung Treng Rapid Response Team  (RRT) was also able to leverage valuable experience and lessons learned from a recent Geochat session  with InSTEDD in the previous week. The exercise incrementally simulated pandemic phase 5 in a  simulation format. The goal was aimed at having local groups understand and develop local  implementation of response plan to identify areas that require improvements and additional resources  and to provide each participating group with a viable pandemic response plan.   The Exercise: Avian Flu  Outbreak in 3 Villages on  October 15, 2008 The exercise  focused on tracking the existing spread  of avian influenza strains (such as  H5N1) that may possibly mutate into a  highly contagious human pandemic and  utilize Geochat, among other  techniques and tools, to help  communicate messages.  There were  several specific challenges addressed in  Least and worst case pandemic scenario played by  the exercise:   Dr. Sovann Ly, Cambodia MoH • This is a truly global task—the presence of a highly communicable human‐to‐human strain of  the virus anywhere requires immediate notification.   • Focus is on population and clinical data since animal data is not currently shared by other  government (Agriculture) or private sectors (Transportation)   • It is necessary to treat the outbreak as a linked collection of health events (corresponding to a  regional areas) rather than a single event, since there will likely be multiple response teams  operating at multiple levels.  Pandemic Alert Period (WHO Pandemic Stages 3 and 4) At this stage, the majority of human  infections have been directly from birds, and only limited human‐to human infection has been observed.   Key steps in addressing the current phases in the WHO Global preparedness plan involve:   • Developing one or more standing groups will be dedicated to Pan Flu Surveillance.  (Likely, there  would be a national one for general tracking, and a dedicated group for planning at the  region/local levels.)   • Incorporate International Data feeds  for international human (WHO) and  animal (OIE) data.  (These may require  NLP processing of free text, or may  require human intervention in the case  of animal data form OIE.)   • Define a “High Level” health event to  represent the H5N1 threat, and to  associate ongoing tasks for further  monitoring.  Pandemic Alert Period (WHO Pandemic  Stage 5) When larger clusters of human‐to‐ human infection have been observed it will be  Introduction to InSTEDD’s Geochat as it relates to the  necessary to:  Simulation Exercise Page | 5
  • 6. • Create a Health Event for each cluster that is linked to the “overall” H5N1 Health Event.   • Spawn tasks for each new Health Event for development of case definitions, and for monitoring  selected indicators.  • Create new groups (as necessary) for RRT and local (village lead and local authorities) response  teams for each of these clusters.  Participants A participant survey was conducted after the training (we received 55 responses  (~73.33% response rate).) Based on this survey, the majority of participants (12 Female (23.5%) and 39  Male (76.5%), 4 missing responses) had health or public health backgrounds as follows:   • There were a total of 20 nurses (37%, 1 missing response), 12 nurses primarily used Nokia  phones (60%), and they joined multiple groups with the majority being in the Yellow2 group (11  (55%)), Yellow1 group (4 (20%)), and Blue1 group (2 (10%).)   •  There were a total of 12 MDs (22%, 1 missing response), 9 MDs primarily used Nokia phones  (75%), and they uniformly joined multiple groups (majority are in group Yellow2 (25%).)  • There was 1 participant with a  formal degree in public health  (MPH) who used a Nokia phone and  joined the Green3 group.   • Other participants 11 (20%) had  various background or training (data  entry, laboratory, midwife,  pharmacy, physiotherapy, infectious  diseases, malaria and diarrhea, or  Geochat Training conducted by the InSTEDD Team IT); the majority have used Nokia  phones (73%), and uniformly  Geochat Group n % joined multiple groups.  Blue1 (simulated cross-border—Champasak) 4 7.5 • 19% of participants did not  Green1 (Kampot) 4 7.5 specify their background or  Green2(Takeo) 2 3.8 training.  Green3 (Kompong Speu) 2 3.8 •  Almost half the participants (23  Green4 (Ratanakiri) 0 0 (42.59%), 1 missing response)  Green5 (Mondulkiri) 2 3.8 were between the ages of 36‐45  Green6 (Kampong Cham) 3 5.7 Yellow1 (Rapid Response Team) 6 11.3 year. 3 under 25 years old  Yellow2 (Provincial Health and Reference Hospital) 18 34 (5.56%, 1 missing response), 14  Yellow3 (Authorities) 7 13.2 between the ages of 26‐35 years  Yellow4 (Others) 5 9.4 (25.93%, 1 missing response),  and 14 over 45 years old (25.93%, 1 missing response.)   • Most participants had electricity at work (47 (85.45%)) and at home (48 (90.57%), 2 missing  responses), had phone coverage at home (50 (94.34%), 2 missing responses) and work (51  (92.73%), and had Computer at home (32 (60.38%), 2 missing responses) and at work (26  (47.27%).) The majority of participants did not have Internet at home (18 (33.96%), 2 missing  responses) nor at work (13 (23.64%).)  The participants; per instructions from CDC, broke out into 3 major groups of ~20 people in each group  (2 provinces in each group) and CDC facilitated various preparedness and response plan discussions in a  Q/A format specifically targeted at the local level. For the purpose of the exercise, we further broke the  3 groups into Geochat groups to match their roles. Various SMS messages were exchange during the  simulation exercise following the Ministry of Health communication policy. Participants were then asked  Page | 6
  • 7. to join one of 10 different groups given their role in the exercise. The majority of the users (18 users or  34%) joined the Stung Treng Provincial Health and Reference Hospital (Yellow2) group (2 missing  responses), 13 users (24.6%) were from other provinces, and 7 users were representatives from the  authorities group (fire, police, etc.)   Though Geochat (in its current design) does not have a specific policy module for hierarchical  information flow, the hierarchies of chain of command and chain of responsibilities were fully respected  by augmenting each step of the simulation exercise as follows:  1. Step One: few cases were reported to Stung Treng PHD by villagers in 2 villages. PHD notifies  CDC and sends RRT team to the two villages. RRT team members communicate among  themselves the findings from the two villages.  Communicating Parties  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using English    characters)  Stung Treng RRT   Stung  5 cases ILI in  5 karney mean ILI  nov srok a  Treng RRT  Village a      Stung Treng RRT   Stung  3 cases ILI in  3 karney mean ILI nov srok b  Treng RRT  Village b      2. Step Two: The head of the RRT team wastes no chance of suspecting Avian Influenza. He sends  CDC an alert from the field of suspect AI cases from these villages and awaits recommendations  from CDC on how to proceed.  Communicating Parties  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using English characters)    Head RRT   CDC  8 cases suspect AI  8 karmey sangsay AI      3. Step Three: CDC alerts all provinces (including Stung Treng) and Champasak (through a  simulated cross‐border coordination) of suspect AI outbreak.  Communicating Parties  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using English    characters)  CDC   PHD and RH in Stung  Suspect AI outbreak in  Sangsay AI pteus nov Stung  Treng  Stung Treng  Treng    Page | 7
  • 8. CDC   ALL Parties  Suspect AI outbreak in  Sangsay AI pteus nov Stung  Stung Treng  Treng    4. Step Four: CDC immediately follows‐up with clear case definition for suspect AI. Communicating  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using    Parties  English characters)  CDC   ALL 7  Suspect AI case definition,  Niyominey karaney sagsay AI:  Provisional Health  fever > 38c with  kamdov leus 38c, pagnaha  Departments and  respiratory problem  phlov danghoem ( khaork, hot,  simulated cross‐ (cough, dyspnea, sore  chheu kor, hear sambor) reu  border  throat, runny nose) or  roksangna phseng phseng  other symptom (diarrhea,  (reak, chheusach dom  myalgia, etc.) AND close  cheadoeum) NOUNG ban pah  contact with poultry (sick  pal cheamuoy sat del chheu reu    or dead chicken) over last  gnab khnong kamlong 7 thgney  7 days  mun  5. Step Five: While CDC awaits further testing, given the matched case definition above in the  villages, CDC orders authorities to close access to villages immediately. Communicating Parties  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using English    characters)  CDC/PHD   Authorities (e.g.,  Close access to  Bit kar chang choul phum  Police)  village      6. Step Six: At this point, villages are in self‐sustainment mode where each village lead coordinate  and collaborate with families and local authorities to issue Quarantine, distribute medication  and PPE masks, request help from local authorities in maintaining order in the village and  making sure Quarantine is in effect for identified cases, alert local hospitals or treatment centers  of the situation so they prepare infection control units, and help the sick reach local treatment  center per protocol. For training purposes we relaxed the assumption of hierarchical reporting  at the very end of the exercise by letting information flow freely within workgroups, in particular  for those representing field workers. This allowed users to get more familiar with the software  and be more creative in coordinating an outbreak/pandemic response. Communicating  Geochat Message  Khmer Translation (using English    Parties  characters)  General Messages  1. Does anyone have a  1. Teu nak na mean lan te?  among field  car?  2. Yeun trov ka thnam  workers, first  2. We need medicine  3. Yeun trov ka PPE  responders,  3. We need PPEs  4. Nor na chea prathean phom?  authorities, and  4. Who is the head of  5. Cruosa trov ka aha  government  village?  6. Knhon trov ka mazut  officials at CDC and  5. Family needs food  7. Men anugnat ouy mean ka  provisional levels.  6. I need mazut  choub chum nov wat  (gasoline)  8. Te phsa boeuk reu nov?  Page | 8
  • 9. 7. No gathering allowed  9. Te sala boeuk reu nov?  at Pagoda  10.Knom trov ka lanpet  8. Is market open?  11.Teu mean avey ouy yeung  9. Is school open?  chhouy te?  10.I need an ambulance  12.Ter yerng ach chuoy avey  11.Can we help?  ban?  12.What can we do to  13.Ter neak mean thnam  help?  bonthem te?  13.Do you have extra  14.Bat yerng mean thnam  medicine?  15.Ter neak mean thnam krob  14.Yes, we have extra  kran te?  medicine  16.Te yerng khmean thnam te    15.Do you have enough  17.Ter neak mean PPE bonthem  medicine?  te?  16.No, we don’t have  18.Bat yerng mean PPE  any medicine  19.Ter neak mean PPE krob kran  17.Do you have extra  te?  PPEs?  20.Te yerng khmean PPE te  18.Yes, we have extra  21.Ter yerng ach tor tuol    PPEs  chumnuoy pi Quarantine te?  19.Do you have enough  PPEs?  20.No, we don’t have  any PPEs  21.Can we get help with    Quarantine      The findings of this simulation exercise suggest potential use of SMS text‐messaging as a communication  medium for bi‐directional exchange between field practitioners, field practitioners and central, and  cross sectors. A contribution of this simulation exercise is the data collection in a community setting in  bridging the digital divide where affordability is a limitation. The following figure shows the overall  number of messages exchanged during the exercise (including test and training messages)    Total Messages (exercise and training) Exchanged during the AI Simulation Exercise.  October 13, 2008 thru October 15, 2008, Stung Treng, Cambodia  Page | 9
  • 10. Exercise Phase  Delivery Date  Number of Messages  Number of Parts  Message Status  Actual Exercise  10/15/2008  1  1  Error delivering message  Actual Exercise  10/15/2008  2204  2213  Received by recipient  Actual Exercise  10/15/2008  26  26  Delivered to gateway  Training  10/14/2008  16  16  Error delivering message  Training  10/14/2008  776  776  Received by recipient  Training  10/14/2008  62  62  Delivered to gateway  Training  10/13/2008  5  5  Error delivering message  Training  10/13/2008  496  496  Received by recipient  Training  10/13/2008  48  48  Delivered to gateway  Breakdown and Status of Messages (exercise and training) Exchanged during the AI Simulation Exercise,   October 13, 2008 thru October 15, 2008, Stung Treng, Cambodia    Total Messages (exercise only) Exchanged during the morning of the AI Simulation Exercise,   October 15, 2008, Stung Treng, Cambodia  Participants Feedback According to the survey results (using Likert scale and open‐ended  questions) we provide the following summary:  Cell Phone  Use  Participants  used a total of  14 different  phone with  the majority of  participants  (73%) used  Nokia (2 users  did not have  phone during  the exercise, 3 missing responses.)  The majority of the phones did not support local Khmer language (47  (94%), 5 missing responses).) MobiTel code (012) provided mobile service for 2/3rd of the phones (33  (67.35%)), and Sinawatra (code 011) were the service provider for 1/3rd of the phones (16 (32.65%).)  Page | 10
  • 11. Using Geochat Of the 55 complete responses 45 (82.2%) users were able to join a group, 46 (84.4%)  sent at least one message to a group, 47 (85.5%) users receive at least one message from a group, and 3  (5.5%) were unable to use Geochat.   The feedback we received was very positive:  Phone Type n % • Users favored the training and they:  Golden 1 1.9 a. would like similar training in the future (mean 1.3 (95%  no phone 2 3.8 CI: 1.1‐1.5 (0.10 SD)), with 1 quot;Definitely, I would like to  Nokia 38 73.1 Nokia 6085 1 1.9 do this type of training againquot; and 5 quot;Definitely NOT, I  Nokia 6270 1 1.9 would not like to do this type of exercise againquot;, 1  Nokia 63 00 1 1.9 missing response),   Nokia 6300 1 1.9 b. felt the training was adequate (mean 1.8 (95% CI: 1.6‐ Nokia 7610 1 1.9 Nokia N 95 1 1.9 2.1 (0.12 SD)), with 1 quot;Yes, I learned a lotquot; and 5 quot;not  Nokia N70 1 1.9 reallyquot;, 2 missing responses) and   Nokia N81 1 1.9 c. felt their questions were answered (mean 1.4 (95% CI:  Nokia(6120) 1 1.9 Nokia(N95) 1 1.9 1.2‐1.6 (0.10 SD)), with 1 quot;Yes, all my questions were  Sony Ericson 1 1.9 answeredquot; and 5 quot;none of my questions were  answeredquot;, 5 missing responses.)  Geochat Group Preference n • Users felt confident they can use the system on their own  Village health volunteer 41 (mean 1.8 (95% CI: 1.6‐2.1 (0.13 SD)), with 1 being  Village health center 45 Completely Confident and 5 Not at all Confident.)   District heath department 38 • Users asked for using Geochat immediately (“ASAP”) for real  Provincial health department 44 Cambodia CDC 43 life scenarios and in other provinces (1 missing response.)  Provincial RRT 43 Participants were then asked their preference; if they were using  National RRT 39 Geochat today, of which group they will join. The following table  Authority 36 summarizes the responses for each role (assuming the groups were  NGO 27 formed based on the role of participants.)  Cross border 33 Other 9 Challenges and Opportunities ICTs have enabled public health  officials in Cambodia (and other countries in the region) to coordinate public health response. More  traditional ICTs like radio and television have been beneficial in disease prevention and epidemic  response. In Cambodia, this has been evident in response to recent Avian Influenza cases, HIV/AIDS,  Malaria and Cholera amongst other diseases. More recent ICTs like mobile phones, email and Internet  could also be used for training, outbreak investigation and coordinated response, and even sending  health alerts to the general public. Although Geochat has the potential to be greatly beneficial for the  public health sector in Cambodia    (and other countries in the Southeast Asia region and similar developing countries), its success is  sometimes marred by challenges and contradictions. This includes the workable condition and costs of  ICT equipment, mobile coverage, level of awareness, and skills of the potential users, technology  compatibility and policy provisions amongst others. The ICT infrastructure status in Cambodia currently  is unable to adequately support the full benefits of Geochat in the public health and health sectors.  Internet access is very limited or non‐existent below the provisional level. Most health centers and  provisional health departments still use manual systems of recording and exchanging weekly and  monthly information. Cost of text‐messaging or accessing the internet (further discussed in next  section), maintaining the equipment and buying new ones are also a challenge. In addition to the costs  and status of infrastructure, there is currently very little emphasis on quot;horizontalquot; collaboration (e.g.,  province‐to‐province, or local‐to‐local.) Related to this are the following elements as requested in the  feedback we received from participants:  Page | 11
  • 12. • Local Khmer language support to make it easier to communicate, especially for those in the  field.   • More frequent training in Stung Treng and other provinces  • Faster delivery of message once it’s been sent—(during the exercise users experienced delayed  message delivery (in some instances for up to 60‐90 minutes), an issue we believe might be  related to local mobile service provider (MobiTel and/or Sinawatra) since the Geochat system  received all messages in time. Our engineers continue to work with MobiTel and health officials  to find a solution once the problem is further identified.)  When we asked why a user might not want to use Geochat,  quot;Need Geochat as soon as possible to get  only 10 users (or 18% or the total responses) indicated their  ready to fight epidemic disease especially AIquot;  inability to use for the following reasons:   • 3 users (5.5%) find it difficult to use an English‐based  quot;…slow SMS response, hard to communicate  phone  across different group” Kampot  • 2 users (3.6%) cannot afford a cell phone  • 3 users (5.5%) find it difficult to use an English‐based  quot;...suggest InSTEDD to support RRT team for  smooth operation because I will learn more  phone AND cannot afford a cell phone  from InSTEDD.quot; • 1 user finds it difficult to use text‐messaging (SMS)  • 1 user (1.8%) worried about delayed response to CDC  “I suggest having Geochat training in other  provinces…” or MoH  We envision Geochat to also enable distance learning for health personnel and others on several health  issues.  Costs and sustainability Though we haven’t conducted an economic study on the annual per capita  cost to the Cambodian government, the Geochat model offers a toll free number to the user through a  SMS gateway at a country or regional level. We anticipate the cost will be only a small fraction of what  would be for each user to use their personal number. Additional costs include occasional visits from  Phnom Penh for training, supervision, and evaluation. This cost would be even lower if the system was  operated by the District once appropriately trained by our team. We anticipate Geochat to be lower  than that of many similar systems running in developing countries to date, because of its use of existing  health infrastructure and staff, which costs much less than projects run by non‐governmental  organizations where additional staff and facilities have to be funded (O’Neill 1993; Cairncross et al.  1997.) The anticipated amount of staff time  required to manage the system will be relatively  small; 1 day per month during the ICT meeting for  central level, plus a half‐day of training, and time  spent on outbreak response, if any. Additional  focus is on training Provisional and District health  departments, health centers and Village Health  Volunteers (VHVs) (3–4 half days per month.)  The InSTEDD Geochat (and other InSTEDD tools) –  coupled with the InSTEDD local innovation lab –  has many attributes that could make it more  The Komphun rural Health Center serves over 7000  viable – that is sustainable – than other initiatives.  population in the Stung Treng and neighboring  provinces. The center’s director already uses SMS to  First, VHVs and health staff could potentially run  communicate potential outbreak information or  and manage the system by themselves, with little  suspect AI cases to PHD and CDC  technical or supervisory support. Second, the  system augments the existing health system and  Page | 12
  • 13. resources, following the Ministry of Health policy and strategy to strengthen the Operational District  structure. It gives the Operational District and health center a mechanism to fulfill their role in disease  prevention and control in the communities. Third, the InSTEDD Geochat comprises mechanisms to  maintain VHVs’ motivation to continue community‐based surveillance. The mechanisms include  continuous training and supportive supervision from the InSTEDD local staff in the innovation lab,  ‘instant feedback’, and involvement in data analysis and decision‐making. Additional mechanisms could  be offered by the Cambodian government which include; health care benefits and work recognition.  Conclusion This exercise introduced protocols and basic communication tactics hypothesized to  improve pandemic preparedness. An AI scenario was selected by the MoH and CDC due to the  “commanding nature” initiated in a typical pandemic response effort. The setting presented supported a  response action that was realistic to the community practitioner role. Direct application with response  tactics and the type of role the community practitioner can play in a pandemic that extends beyond  routine surveillance activities especially that external help may not be available or is not known to occur.  However, the challenge of finding ways to increase SMS usage through everyday needs in local  communities remains. Practice to increase use of mobile technologies including SMS text‐messaging can  assist community practitioners working in the field and can enhance preparedness and response. We  recommend that a community based surveillance system is most needed by Cambodia and the region.  InSTEDD suite of tools (Geochat, Hotline, Riff, Mesh4x, and RNA)—run and maintained by Cambodia  MoH and local health staff—is feasible and that this framework can produce useful information for  training and for monitoring trends to identify potential outbreaks of common infectious diseases (Please  refer to Appendix II for a further discussion on a recommended strategy and opportunities for Cambodia  and the region.) Page | 13
  • 14. Appendix I: Agenda   Simulation Exercise for AI focusing on Information Technology, Sekong Star Hotel  (Stung Treng), 13­15 October, 2008    Date/Time  Program/Topic presentation  Presenter  Day 1  8:00‐8:30  Registration    8:30‐9:30  Opening Session      Welcome Address  Director of CDC  Department         Representation of  InSTEDD  Director of Stung Treng  PHD  09:30‐10:00  Tea/Coffee Break    10:00‐12:00  Updated Situation general of AI in the  Dr. Ly Sovann  world     Lunch    13:30‐15:00  National Surveillance Response in  Dr. Chan Vuthy  Cambodia  15:00‐15:30  Tea/Coffee Break    15:30‐17:00  National Plan for AI Response   Dr. Ly Sovann  Day 2      8:00‐8:30  Registration    08:30‐10:00  Discussion on Rapid Containment plan  CDC/MOH and RRT/ST  10:00‐10:30  Tea/Coffee Break    10:00‐12:00  Continuous Discussion   CDC/MOH and RRT/ST  12:00‐13:30  Lunch    13:30‐15:00  Focusing on information technology  InSTEDD Representation  15:00‐15:30  Tea/Coffee Break    15:30‐17:00  Focusing on information technology  InSTEDD Representation  (Continuous)  Day 3      8:00‐8:30  Registration    08:30‐10:00  Field testing on information technology    10:00‐10:30  Tea/Coffee Break    10:00‐11:00  Field testing on information technology    (Continuous)  11:00‐11:30  Closing session      Page | 14
  • 15. Appendix II: Strategic Opportunities  Opportunities to Enhance Disease Detection and Response for Cambodia and the MBDS Region  The incidence of specific infectious diseases in Cambodia such as Guinea worm infection, yaws, malaria,  HIV and tuberculosis; pregnancy outcomes; nutritional status of children; and vital events is tracked  through various disease surveillance programs, each of which focuses on a single disease. This approach  does not maximize the value of scarce resources available at the peripheral level and often misses  emerging infections. The confirmation in the first week of February 2005 that the H5N1 strain of avian  influenza had claimed its first human victim in Cambodia had raised great concerns about surveillance  capabilities in Cambodia and in nearby countries. In addition, the diagnosis of the very first case was  made not in Cambodia but in neighboring Vietnam, where the 25‐year‐old woman had sought treatment  and died on January 30, 2005.   These incidents underscore the need to have a better surveillance approach; for both human and  animal, for Cambodia and the region. Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar have relatively small poultry  populations, and therefore there is probably less H5N1 virus in circulation in these countries. But their  underdeveloped surveillance capabilities also offer less chance of early detection of an outbreak,  especially if the virus becomes easily transmissible among humans. Clearly, what is most needed in  Cambodia is a community‐based disease surveillance, in which data (human and animal) are actively  collected through periodic home visits. This approach will yield a higher proportion of cases reported  than the current passive data collection surveillance systems. The use of tally sheets; that can easily be  deployed on cell phones, to record and report events is most appropriate for semi‐literate Village Health  Volunteers (VHVs) in remote areas which could also help reduce errors in data collection. Since the first  incident H5N1 confirmed human case from Cambodia, US CDC has funded several efforts in conjunction  with WHO and Cambodia MoH to strengthen VHVs in the Kendal and Kampot Provinces (in the southern  tip of Cambodia) hotspots. To‐date, there are more than 260 village workers that are well trained in  identifying and reporting human and animal health events—(two workers per village; a human health  reporter and animal health reporter, for each of 140 villages in the two provinces.) Events currently  monitored are multiple, important, relevant and relatively easy for local people to identify.  Furthermore, a community‐based surveillance system which is developed with local participation and  locally managed is likely to be more effective than vertically‐run programs and projects developed and  implemented by national, international or non‐governmental organizations.  The current disease surveillance process in the region is anomaly‐centric (change in health‐related  patterns) as identified by perceived health‐related threats. The objective of better and earlier disease  detection is to detect and to characterize these changes such as environmental changes (e.g., heat  wave, hurricane, and chemical spills), causes of disease and the demographics of affected individuals,  and the potential disease agents.  The analysis must produce information in a form that is useful to  decision makers. The following exhibit illustrates the process of how biosurveillance requires a  combination of active and passive surveillance systems along with an intervention model.  Initially, an  ongoing passive surveillance system monitors existing baseline information as well as identifies  anomalies from that baseline.  A sensitive and responsive passive surveillance system will rapidly initiate an appropriate active  surveillance response as well as a timely intervention and response (e.g., quarantine of a localized area  until further details can be ascertained through the active surveillance process). Active surveillance  starts when a change in health‐related pattern worthy of attention warrants some intervening activity.  All of these activities and processes must be able to function through already existing and well‐defined  policies, protocols, and enabling infrastructure. Infrastructure includes channels of communication in  Page | 15
  • 16. daily and emergency conditions, data networks with common messaging and architecture adherent to  health and public health standards, and the vision of nationally integrated public health and clinical  systems.  This integrated approach would exhibit a flexible, sustainable system of systems that is  nationally‐led, provision or district‐directed, and locally‐operated to provide for a stronger national  biosurveillance system.  When the analysis of routinely collected data (e.g., notifiable diseases (e.g., HIV/AIDS, TB, Cholera,  Malaria, etc.) raises suspicion of an outbreak, a health department may decide to collect additional data  (which feeds back into the analytic process) and take action such as issuing a boil‐water advisory, or  treating individuals with antibiotics or vaccines.  In the case of many public health events, the time lag between exposure to a pathogen and the onset of  symptoms may vary from hours to days to weeks, so effective response to such an event will require a  well conceived, active surveillance process supported by clear scientific evidence. This surveillance can  be further facilitated by an information system integration that enables the timely collection, analysis,  and dissemination of critical information to prevent or mitigate the effects on populations from such  events.  InSTEDD suite of tools and local innovation lab (in Phnom Penh1) can support further sustainment of this  local capacity in which its performance can be linked to the importance of events monitored, the system  design and its key players. InSTEDD has developed a hotline proof‐of‐concept in which the diseases or  syndromes to be reported are locally the most important communicable diseases in terms of severity,  burden or epidemic potential. This proof‐of‐concept can easily be expanded to support community‐ based surveillance. In combination with the hotline, InSTEDD’s Geochat can provide a multi‐directional  flow of information, instant feedback, local use of data, and simplicity as well as decentralized  management of the system. It enables information to be fed back to all participants of the system and  decisions to be made to address identified issues within the same day of data reporting that can  potentially minimize the related workload of the health staff as well. This process challenges all  participants to take necessary remedial action together, the results of which can be closely monitored  by them. This will also overcome constraints due to delayed feedback and non‐participation of local  health staff and communities in data analysis, decision‐making and action‐taking; therefore insuring  better identification and response to local emerging threats. Additionally, births and deaths, on the  contrary, constitute important and relevant information needed for appropriate planning of disease  control and prevention activities as well for monitoring infant and child mortality, as birth and death  registration are not currently available in Cambodia. This information can easily be collected and  exchanged during routine home visits. All these events have elicited the interest of health staff and  VHVs, who are the end users of the data they collect. Furthermore, we propose the following  framework; augmenting existing efforts, in order to insure a comprehensive and integrated disease  surveillance for Cambodia and the region:  Surveillance Data Storage and Management The current systems in place do not address how a  recipient of surveillance data will store the data or make it available for analysis. Our approach (depicted  here) factors in a modification to support sharing a minimum data set (MDS), in addition to its current  collections of data, leveraging on existing investment. This approach will not mandate local facilities to  adopt any particular storage strategy and schema, but will “push” the data directly to them using both  message‐ (e.g., Geochat microformat via a country or regional SMS gateway) and document‐based  means.   1 Phnom Penh Innovation Lab team giving its first steps! http://edjez.instedd.org/2008/09/phnom‐penh‐innovation‐lab‐team‐ giving.html Page | 16
  • 17. Direct Participation of Labs Laboratory information is not shared in timely manner, the availability of  this data can further enhance detection and validation of potential disease outbreaks.   Unstructured Text and RSS Feeds Incorporation of unstructured text sources into surveillance  applications may accelerate detection (e.g., ProMed, feeds from news agencies, text‐messages from  localities, etc.)  Collaboration A collaborative and workflow system must exist in order to bridge existing  communication streams to support a comprehensive detection and response capability. The InSTEDD  platform consists of a suite of collaborative tools, processes and services (Mesh4X, Riff, Geochat  microformats, and RNA) that can provide such capability. These tools were developed through a user‐ centered and iterative design approach   Analytics and Visualization We propose a two‐pronged approach to developing and fielding analytics.  At the initial phase, a cross‐regional capability for SEA must be established, so that agencies of all levels  may use a common set of analytics that we can develop. In the next phase, we will work with users on  identifying an initial test bed for developing analytics and indicators that are optimized for local and  cross‐border health departments and localities. InSTEDD’s RNA can be adapted to provide a  collaborative analytic framework where a myriad of sources, retrieval, analytics (inductive and  deductive), human experts’ input and hypotheses generation, review, and collaboration techniques  coexist seamlessly. RNA can help:  • Identify, characterize, localize and track disease‐related events;  • Maintain a cross‐community awareness of the transmission patterns of diseases in the region;  • Integrate and analyze data relating to disease transmission;  • Predict and detect new onsets, outbreaks and patterns of disease transmission; and   • Disseminate alerts and notifications to respective communities of interest.    Appendix III: Mekong Region Geochat Coverage [to date]  Country  Network  GEOCHAT COVERAGE  96%  Cambodia  CamGSM (MobiTel ~ Tango))  TRUE  1  Cambodia  Camshin (Shinawatra) DCS 1800  TRUE  1  Cambodia  HelloGSM (Telekom Malaysia ~  Casacom) GSM 900  TRUE  1  China  China Mobile  TRUE  1  China  China Telecom  TRUE  1  China  China Unicom  TRUE  1  Lao  Milicom (Tigo)  TRUE  1  Thailand  AIS (Advanced Info Service)  TRUE  1  Thailand  Digital Phone Co  TRUE  1  Thailand  TAC (DTAC)  TRUE  1  Thailand  True Move (Orange)  TRUE  1  Vietnam  Mobifone (VMS)  TRUE  1  Vietnam  Viettel  TRUE  1  Vietnam  Vinaphone (VTS)  TRUE  1    Page | 17