Intregrating COTS Games into your Classroom

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A review of Van Eck's "A Guide to Integrating COTS Games into Your Classroom." by Craig Kasemodel of Alaska eLearning and University of Alaska-Anchorage.

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Intregrating COTS Games into your Classroom

  1. 1. A Guide to Integrating COTS Games into Your Classroom Richard Van Eck University of North Dakota UAA EDAE 637 Design of eLearning Craig Kasemodel 2 March 2009
  2. 2. Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education Van Eck, R. (2009). A guide to integrating COTS games in your classroom. In R. Ferdig (Ed.), Handbook of research on effective electronic gaming in education (1 st ed., pp 179-199). Hershey, Pa.: Information Science Reference.
  3. 3. Theoretical Foundations for Designing Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Game-Based Learning (GBL)
  4. 4. Situated Learning and Cognition <ul><li>Knowledge and transfer are tied to context and domain </li></ul><ul><li>Learning is effective when embedded in a meaningful context </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional events and content must be subservient to the game world </li></ul>
  5. 5. Intrinsic Motivation <ul><li>“ learning that occurs in a situation in the most narrowly defined activity from which the learning occurs would be done without any external reward or punishment” (Malone & Lepper, 1987, p. 229 in Van Eck, 2009, p. 182.) </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Curiosity </li></ul><ul><li>Control </li></ul><ul><li>Fantasy (Endogenous Fantasy) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Objectives and Assessment <ul><li>Communicate to learners to support metacognitive processes and activate/establish relevant schemas (memory units) </li></ul><ul><li>Indirect communication of objectives is the most common method of establishing objectives in a game </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment should parallel your objectives </li></ul>
  7. 7. What does this mean for COTS GBL? <ul><li>Design learning activities, objectives, and assessments with the same principles and narrative context of the game </li></ul><ul><li>Practice = effective instruction builds opportunities for application of what is being learned, accompanied by feedback, to help the learner monitor their own learning </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-Based Learning – a continual process </li></ul>
  8. 8. The NTeQ Model iNtegrating Technology through inQuiry
  9. 9. The NTeQ Model Foundation #1 <ul><li>Instructor is… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technologically Competent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructional Designer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manager </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitator </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. The NTeQ Model Foundation #2 <ul><li>The Student … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Engages in the learning process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assumes the role of the researcher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Becomes technologically competent </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. The NTeQ Model Foundation #3 <ul><li>The computer is … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>used as a tool, as in the workplace, to enhance learning through the use of real-world data to solve problems </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. The NTeQ Model Foundation #4 <ul><li>The Lesson is … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student-Centered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem based </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology based </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authentic </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. The NTeQ Model Foundation #5 <ul><li>The Environment … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporates multiple resource-rich activities </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Putting Theory into Practice <ul><li>Know your Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Know your Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Find a Game </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate the Game </li></ul><ul><li>Design the Lessons </li></ul><ul><li>Documentation </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation </li></ul>
  15. 15. Effective Electronic Gaming in Education
  16. 16. Gaming Benefits <ul><li>Teachers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re-engage the disengaged and challenge the talented: flexible tool to reach all abilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focused on the metacognitive processes which encourage learners to think about the learning process </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pupils: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Speaks a familiar language in today's media-savvy society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Able to learn at their own pace while the games adapt to their needs and abilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces social barriers and encourages participation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Parents: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a mechanism to collaborate and communicate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides a safe environment for experimentation and experience </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Additional Resources <ul><li>http://idt.und.edu/gbl </li></ul><ul><li>http://brainmeld.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://nteq.com </li></ul>
  18. 18. Second Life!
  19. 19. References <ul><li>Van Eck, R. (2009). A guide to integrating COTS games in your classroom. In R. Ferdig (Ed.), Handbook of research on effective electronic gaming in education (1 st ed., pp 179-199). Hershey, Pa.: Information Science Reference. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gamespot.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ign.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.easports.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.atari.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.microsoft.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.2kgames.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.tpld.net/ </li></ul>
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