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 	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  MEDIA	  	  &	  SOCIAL	  MEDIA	  REPORT	  Re:	  Calgary	  Metr...
  2	  	  Metro	  Plan	  mediation	  continues	  Wednesday,	  April	  10,	  2013	  10:49:01	  MDT	  AM	  The	  Calgary	  Re...
  3	  	  Councilors	  trade	  barbs	  over	  Calgary	  Metropolitan	  Plan	  By	  Marco	  Vigliotti,	  High	  River	  Time...
  4	  “The	  costs	  are	  of	  significant	  concerns	  (with)	  our	  share	  of	  the	  contribution	  at	  $0.42	  per...
  5	  But	  those	  opposing	  the	  plan	  said	  the	  key	  issue	  is	  the	  threat	  posed	  by	  handing	  over	  a...
  6	  	  Anderson	  addresses	  CRP	  Wednesday,	  March	  27,	  2013	  11:30:19	  MDT	  AM	  	  Airdrie	  MLA	  Rob	  And...
  7	  whole	  structure	  is	  changed	  that	  they	  have	  issues	  with	  it,”	  said	  Anderson.	  He	  said	  people...
  8	  McBride	  is	  optimistic	  the	  mediation	  between	  the	  two	  holdouts	  and	  the	  CRP	  will	  bear	  fruit...
  9	  	  Anderson	  questions	  ministers	  intentions	  with	  CRP	  	  Mar	  25,	  2013	  02:33	  pm	  |	  By	  Sylvia	 ...
  10	  work	  together	  to	  make	  sure	  we	  have	  smart	  building	  so	  we	  don’t	  have	  environmental	  confli...
  11	  	  Premier	  meets	  with	  Calgary,	  Edmonton	  mayors	  on	  civic	  charters	  Meeting	  follows	  public	  spa...
  12	  	  Forcing	  compliance	  isnt	  answer	  Thursday,	  March	  21,	  2013	  4:27:56	  MDT	  PM	  	  Wildrose	  Airdr...
  13	  into	  something	  we’re	  not.	  If	  we	  wanted	  to	  live	  in	  Calgary,	  great	  city,	  then	  we	  would	...
  14	  	  Irricana	  in	  line	  for	  potential	  CRP	  transit	  study	  	  Mar	  11,	  2013	  03:03	  pm	  |	  By	  Tho...
  15	  “I	  grew	  up	  in	  a	  small	  town	  …	  as	  soon	  as	  you	  turn	  16	  and	  you	  get	  your	  driver’s	 ...
  16	  	  Its	  rural	  vs.	  Calgary	  in	  regional	  plan	  Districts	  say	  theyll	  lose	  autonomy	  if	  city	  ha...
  17	  Turner	  Valley.	  	  While	  all	  its	  members	  agree	  it	  is	  in	  everyone’s	  best	  interests	  to	  tak...
  18	  governance	  powers	  to	  Calgary.	  	  	  Ashdown	  says	  the	  reason	  there	  are	  no	  rural	  MDs	  in	  t...
  19	  	  Rocky	  View	  County	  headed	  to	  mediation	  over	  Calgary	  Metropolitan	  Plan	  Wednesday,	  March	  6,...
  20	  is	  a	  goal	  of	  any	  parties	  involved,	  he	  wants	  to	  ensure	  that	  each	  municipality’s	  autonomy...
  21	  	  CRP,	  County,	  Province	  mediation	  promising	  	  Mar	  04,	  2013	  01:33	  pm	  We	  are	  cautiously	  o...
  22	  	  Province	  offers	  mediation	  to	  CRP,	  rural	  municipalities	  	  Mar	  04,	  2013	  01:28	  pm	  |	  By	 ...
  23	  and	  the	  Municipal	  District	  of	  Foothills.	  “It	  was	  basically	  to	  move	  the	  process	  forward,”	...
  24	  	  TV	  show	  puts	  Chestermere	  in	  the	  limelight	  	  Mar	  04,	  2013	  01:33	  pm	  |	  By	  Thomas	  Mil...
  25	  these	  businesses	  names	  out	  there,”	  said	  Wilson.	  “In	  recent	  years,	  it’s	  been	  very	  successf...
  26	  	  	  February	  28,	  2013	  Updated:	  February	  28,	  2013	  |	  8:08	  pm	  Calgary	  regional	  mediation	  w...
  27	  • 	  • CRP	  agrees	  to	  mediation	  with	  surrounding	  municipalities	  • 	  • By:	  Derek	  Clouthier	  • 	  ...
  28	  • Rural	  municipalities	  must	  also	  agree	  to	  enter	  into	  the	  mediation	  process,	  which	  is	  set	...
  29	  	  Ashdown	  details	  county	  ambitions	  	  By	  James	  Emery,	  Airdrie	  Echo	  Wednesday,	  February	  27,	 ...
  30	  Meanwhile,	  he	  brought	  everyone	  up	  to	  speed	  on	  a	  few	  other	  projects,	  including	  the	  Balza...
  31	  to	  be	  put	  before	  council	  in	  early	  June	  and	  approved	  by	  June	  11	  following	  months	  of	  ...
  32	  	  Mediation	  for	  the	  CRP	  	  By	  Marco	  Vigliotti,	  High	  River	  Times	  Friday,	  March	  1,	  2013	  ...
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013
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Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013

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Calgary Regional Partnership's media report for January to April 2013.

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Transcript of "Calgary Regional Partnership Media Report: January - April 2013"

  1. 1.                                          MEDIA    &  SOCIAL  MEDIA  REPORT  Re:  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  
  2. 2.   2    Metro  Plan  mediation  continues  Wednesday,  April  10,  2013  10:49:01  MDT  AM  The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  and  counties  of  Rocky  View  and  Foothills  are  sitting  down  to  officially  discuss  the  Calgary  Metro  Plan  for  the  first  time  since  February  2012.  Mayor  Truper  McBride,  also  CRP  chairman,  told  town  council  the  parties  will  be  meeting  at  the  Cochrane  RancheHouse,  Apr.  16,  with  a  mediator  as  they  try  to  resolve  their  differences.  The  counties  left  the  CRP  in  2009  because  of  objections  to  some  components  of  the  plan.  McBride  told  council  mediation  is  expected  to  wrap  up  by  June.
  3. 3.   3    Councilors  trade  barbs  over  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  By  Marco  Vigliotti,  High  River  Times  Tuesday,  April  9,  2013  1:34:11  MDT  PM    High  River  town  council  voted  to  postpone  debate  Monday  on  a  ceremonial  motion  endorsing  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP)  after  councilors  grinded  to  a  stalemate  over  the  expansive  regional  plan.  The  motion  was  brought  forward  by  Coun.  Tim  Whitford  –an  opponent  of  the  plan-­‐  who  said  he  was  doing  so  to  provide  an  opportunity  for  councilors  to  publicly  share  their  views  on  the  subject.  But  Coun.  Don  Moore  said  the  motion  was  puzzling,  adding  he  did  not  see  the  purpose  of  endorsing  or  opposing  the  CMP,  especially  with  the  provincial  government  still  actively  pursuing  mediated  talks  over  the  plan  with  three  objecting  rural  municipalities,  including  the  MD  of  Foothills.  All  councilors,  including  Whitford,  eventually  sided  with  Moore  on  tabling  the  motion  but  not  before  they  took  turns  arguing  for  and  against  the  plan–which  is  supposed  to  govern  the  future  of  growth,  water  and  transit  for  the  wider  Calgary  region.  One  of  the  fiercest  opponents  on  council,  Whitford  charged  that  the  CMP  would  eventually  grow  into  another  bloated  layer  of  government  that  will  sap  away  finances  from  the  town.  
  4. 4.   4  “The  costs  are  of  significant  concerns  (with)  our  share  of  the  contribution  at  $0.42  per  person,”  he  said,  noting  these  costs  will  continue  to  grow  over  the  years.  Whitford  also  argued  one  of  the  biggest  potential  fiscal  burdens  in  the  plan  is  a  proposed  regional  transit  system  aiming  to  connect  members  of  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  –the  group  designing  the  CMP.  This  system  intends  to  link  municipalities  from  as  far  away  as  Nanton  with  the  Calgary  transit  system  through  an  express  bus  service  that  will  transport  commuters  to  their  nearest  C-­‐train  stations.  However  some  CRP  members,  including  High  River,  want  to  delay  their  participation  in  the  program,  because  they  do  not  think  it  is  economical  right  now  to  finance  their  own  bus  line,  which  is  a  requirement  of  the  system.  Whitford  said  the  town  would  be  forced  to  contribute  considerable  funding  to  the  system  immediately  regardless  of  when  they  plan  on  joining  up.  “(I  feel)  the  town  will  lose  control  (to  the  CRP),  particularly  in  transportation,”  he  said.  “At  the  start  of  a  transit  line,  (an  average  municipality)  subsidizes  75-­‐80  per  cent  of  the  costs.”  “I  feel  we  would  be  sucked  in  early  (into  this  system)  and  lose  the  ability  to  control  costs.”  Yet,  Moore  rebutted  these  claims,  arguing  the  town  would  not  be  forced  to  contribute  to  the  system  until  they  are  linked  up.  He  also  stressed  the  CRP  plans  to  remain  a  volunteer  organization  and  in  fact,  is  supporting  the  mediated  discussions.  “(The  minister)  said  he  did  not  want  to  legislate  the  plan  (over  the  objections  of  the  rural  municipalities)  and  is  pursuing  arbitration  (talks),”said  Moore.  “The  CRP  has  said  they  want  to  be  a  volunteer  organization.”  Despite  this  talk  of  volunteer  association,  Moore  did  say  the  government  has  signaled  they  will  use  their  power  of  the  purse  to  win  over  objectors  to  the  CMP.    He  said  municipal  affairs  minister  Doug  Griffiths  has  already  pledged  to  connect  support  for  the  CMP  with  the  main  source  of  infrastructure  funding  for  any  municipality  in  the  province  -­‐the  Municipal  Sustainability  Initiative  (MSI)  “(The  minister  also)  said  he  plans  on  using  a  carrot  and  stick  approach  (to  get  municipalities  to  sign  on  to  the  CMP)  by  (adjusting)  funding  from  the  MSI,”  said  Moore.  Proponents  of  the  plan  noted  these  efforts  by  the  provincial  government,  warning  opposition  to  the  CMP  could  harm  the  town  finances.  
  5. 5.   5  But  those  opposing  the  plan  said  the  key  issue  is  the  threat  posed  by  handing  over  a  big  share  of  municipal  authority  to  the  City  of  Calgary,  which  they  claim  essentially  controls  the  CRP  because  of  their  significant  clout.  “I  am  very  much  against  the  CMP,”  said  Coun.  Betty  Hiebert.  “I  do  not  like  the  veto  (that  Calgary  would  have)  and  developing  another  layer  of  government.”  “It  will  cost  High  River  for  decades.”  The  question  of  authority  and  power  within  the  CRP  has  consistently  stalled  the  completion  of  the  plan,  which  has  been  in  development  for  the  past  15  years.  The  three  rural  municipalities  dropped  out  of  the  CRP  in  2009  over  these  concerns,  saying  they  will  lose  their  authority  to  sanction  development  in  their  own  jurisdictions.  However  supporters  maintain  the  CMP  is  an  ambitious  and  necessary  plan  crafting  a  shared  vision  for  the  future  of  a  diverse  and  heavily  populated  region.  “I  support  (an)  effort  to  try  and  affect  change  within,”  said  Coun.  Jamie  Kinghorn  of  the  CMP.  “It  benefits  all  communities  in  the  area,”  added  Coun.  Al  Brander.    
  6. 6.   6    Anderson  addresses  CRP  Wednesday,  March  27,  2013  11:30:19  MDT  AM    Airdrie  MLA  Rob  Anderson  doesn’t  believe  communities  should  be  forced  to  follow  the  ‘stack  ‘em  and  pack  ‘em’  model  of  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP)  nor  should  they  be  held  for  ransom  by  threatening  to  limit  access  to  safe  and  stable  water.  The  Wildrose  opposition  house  leader  questioned  Municipal  Affairs  minister  Doug  Griffiths  on  whether  jurisdictions  objecting  to  endorsing  the  plan  will  legislated  to  join  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  during  the  Mar.  20  question  period,  but  said  he  didn’t  receive  a  commitment.  Anderson  asked,  “Will  you  commit  that  you  will  not  legislatively  compel  any  community  to  join  the  CRP,  nor  force  them  to  build  to  the  CRP’s  minimum  density  requirement  of  eight  units  per  acre?”  Anderson’s  question  hit  the  Legislature  floor  just  as  the  mediation  process  began  between  the  CRP  and  two  municipalities  who  take  issue  with  the  metro  plan.  Both  the  Rocky  View  County  and  Municipal  District  of  Foothills  opted  out  of  the  CRP  in  2009  because  of  their  objections  to  the  CMP.  They  believe  the  plan  limits  their  authority  on  development  issues  and  constrains  water  licensing.  “Rocky  View  has  been  very  clear  that  until  the  density  requirements  are  relaxed  and  the  
  7. 7.   7  whole  structure  is  changed  that  they  have  issues  with  it,”  said  Anderson.  He  said  people  are  starting  to  get  fed  up  with  the  direction  being  taken.  “I  know  the  people  of  Airdrie  are  starting  to  get  tired  of  developments  in  our  community  that  are  trying  to  turn  us  into  something  we’re  not.  If  we  wanted  to  live  in  Calgary,  a  great  city,  then  we  would  live  in  Calgary.  “But  we  have  chosen  to  live  in  Airdrie  or  Cochrane  or  Chestermere  and  so  forth  because  we  want  a  little  more  space.  I  think  a  lot  of  people  are  getting  tired  of  having  these  ‘stack  ‘em  and  pack  ‘em’  communities  being  wedged  into  our  rural  communities.”  Anderson  recognizes  there  is  a  demand  for  smaller  homes  and  lots  for  low  and  middle-­‐income  families.  What  he  believes  is  each  jurisdiction  should  have  autonomy  when  it  comes  to  making  these  decisions.  But  this  autonomy  has  been  given  to  members  of  the  CRP  in  the  metro  plan,  said  CRP  chairman  Truper  McBride,  who  is  also  mayor  of  Cochrane.  The  plan  is  designed  to  allow  municipalities  control  over  their  own  development  and  isn’t  intended  to  create  another  level  of  government.  Areas  earmarked  for  development  in  the  future,  as  identified  by  individual  municipalities,  will  not  be  affected  by  the  plan.  McBride  said  the  voting  formula  also  ensures  the  smaller  municipalities  have  a  voice  to  put  them  on  par  with  Calgary.  Making  changes  to  the  plan  requires  the  agreement  of  two-­‐thirds  majority  of  municipalities  representing  50  per  cent  of  the  region’s  population.  By  doing  so,  only  decisions  widely  agreed  upon  will  pass.  Anderson  takes  issue  with  using  the  assurance  of  a  water  supply  as  a  bargaining  chip  to  force  a  consensus  on  the  plan.  “It’s  wrong  for  the  province  to  say  communities  like  Cochrane,  Airdrie,  Chestermere  and  Rocky  View  have  to  join  against  their  will  a  partnership  that  says  if  you  want  access  to  water  you  have  to  build  the  way  that  we  want  you  to  build.  That  takes  away  autonomy  from  local  residents  and  it’s  a  little  bit  like  having  a  gun  put  to  your  head  and  saying  if  you  want  to  develop,  you  have  to  do  it  our  way  or  you  just  won’t  develop.”  McBride  said  the  plan  is  essential  to  guide  growth  in  the  region  and  is  anxious  to  get  it  into  place  after  all  these  years.  Work  on  the  plan  was  initiated  in  2006  and  a  draft  was  finalized  in  2009.  “It  is  absolutely  vital  that  we  have  a  region  plan  and  vision  in  place  to  guide  development  going  into  the  future,”  said  McBride.  “We  know  that  the  status  quo  has  presented  problems.  It’s  very  expensive  to  service  from  a  taxpayer  standpoint.  We  have  to  put  something  in  place  and  the  metro  plan  does  it.”  
  8. 8.   8  McBride  is  optimistic  the  mediation  between  the  two  holdouts  and  the  CRP  will  bear  fruit.  Last  week,  McBride  and  the  CRP  board  had  an  initial  meeting  with  the  mediator.  He  expects  talks  will  be  in  full  swing  by  mid-­‐April.  County  officials  have  also  had  initial  meetings  with  the  mediator.  Prior  to  initial  meetings,  Rocky  View  County  reeve  Rolly  Ashdown  said  he  looked  forward  to  the  discussions.  Municipal  Affairs  minister  Doug  Griffiths  wants  to  see  the  long-­‐standing  impasse  resolved  and  last  month  his  department  stepped  in  to  help  with  the  process.  “The  intent  will  be  to  have  this  mediation  wrapped  up  by  June  and  the  minister  has  told  me  failure  is  not  an  option,”  said  McBride.  “So,  they’re  quite  serious  about  this  and  I  think  it  is  a  good  thing.  We’re  receiving  some  leadership  on  this  from  the  province  and  I  commend  them  for  that.”  Anderson,  too,  favours  regional  partnerships  but  doesn’t  like  the  methods  being  used.  “I  like  the  idea  of  regional  partnerships  but  not  when  someone  has  a  gun  to  your  head,  that’s  not  a  partnership,  that’s  a  shake  down  and  it’s  time  for  the  province  to  step  up  and  solve  this  problem,  not  by  forcing  regionalization  but  by  making  sure  that  all  communities  in  the  Calgary  region  have  access  to  water  and  not  just  Calgary.”  
  9. 9.   9    Anderson  questions  ministers  intentions  with  CRP    Mar  25,  2013  02:33  pm  |  By  Sylvia  Cole    Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths  said  forcing  rural  municipalities  into  an  agreement  with  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  won’t  work.  That  was  his  response  to  Wildrose  Airdrie  MLA  Rob  Anderson  who  asked  Griffiths  during  Question  Period  March  20  not  to  force  any  community  to  join  the  CRP,  nor  force  them  to  build  to  the  CRP’s  minimum  density  standard.  The  CRP  is  currently  in  mediation  between  the  rural  municipalities  of  Rocky  View  County  and  the  MD  of  Foothills  pertaining  to  the  partnerships  governing  document,  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP).  Mediation  began  as  proposed  by  Griffiths  and  is  expected  to  be  complete  by  the  end  of  June.  During  the  Question  Period  in  Edmonton,  Anderson  said  there  is  concern  about  the  South  Saskatchewan  Regional  Plan  (SSRP),  and  added  that  a  legislated  CMP  as  part  of  the  regional  plan  will  “rob  communities  like  Airdrie  and  Rocky  View  of  their  autonomy  to  grow  in  the  way  they  feel  is  best  for  their  citizens.”  He  said  restrictions  in  both  the  SSRP  and  CRP  would  turn  the  communities  into  “cookie-­‐cutter  stack  ‘em  and  pack  ‘em  growth  nodes  as  the  CRP  calls  them.”  Griffiths  responded  to  Anderson  and  said  mediation  is  being  undertaken  to  get  all  of  the  partners  at  the  table  to  discuss  a  solution.  “I’ve  said  many  times  ...  That  forcing  people  to  work  together  does  not  get  good  relationships,  but  allowing  them  not  to  talk  to  each  other  does  not  get  good  relationships  either,”  he  said.  “It’s  imperative  for  the  success  of  this  province  going  forward  that  these  municipalities  
  10. 10.   10  work  together  to  make  sure  we  have  smart  building  so  we  don’t  have  environmental  conflicts  and  agricultural  conflicts  and  industrial  conflicts,”  he  said.  Anderson  agreed  and  then  asked  if  the  minister  of  environment  would  provide  access-­‐to-­‐water  license  for  these  communities  without  “forcing  them  to  join  the  CRP.”  He  said  southern  Alberta  communities  have  concerns  over  water  access  and  fear  water  for  new  businesses  and  residents  is  going  to  be  used  as  a  pressure  point  to  enter  into  the  CMP.  Diana  McQueen,  minister  of  environment,  said  she  is  in  the  midst  of  consultation  on  water  discussions  and  said  “we’re  hearing  from  everybody  with  regard  to  the  need  to  share  water,  water  management,  waste  water,  healthy  lakes,  hydraulic  fracturing  and  water  use.”  She  said  it’s  an  “important  discussion”  and  invites  all  Albertans  to  provide  input  before  there  are  any  policy  changes.  The  South  Saskatchewan  region  includes  about  45  per  cent  of  Albertans  living  in  the  cities  of  Calgary,  Airdrie  and  Lethbridge,  as  well  as  a  number  of  municipalities  including  Rocky  View  County.  The  region  comprises  about  12  per  cent  of  Alberta’s  land  base  -­‐  83,774  square  kilometres.  The  SSRP  is  the  second  of  seven  regional  plans  that  will  be  developed  based  on  Alberta’s  major  watersheds.  
  11. 11.   11    Premier  meets  with  Calgary,  Edmonton  mayors  on  civic  charters  Meeting  follows  public  spat  between  Calgarys  mayor  and  Albertas  municipal  affairs  minister  CBC  News  Posted:  Mar  23,  2013  11:45  AM  MT    Premier  Alison  Redford  met  with  the  mayors  of  Calgary  and  Edmonton  Friday  to  discuss  civic  charters  for  Albertas  two  big  cities.  Charters  for  Edmonton  and  Calgary,  agreed  to  in  principle  in  2012,  would  provide  the  cities  more  powers.  The  meeting  follows  a  growing  rift  between  Mayor  Naheed  Nenshi  and  the  Redford  government  since  Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths  suggested  Nenshi  was  playing  politics  and  acting  like  a  peacock.  Nenshi  had  called  for  the  premier  to  get  personally  involved  in  the  talks,  as  they  werent  progressing  as  quickly  as  had  been  expected.  He  also  wanted  to  address  negotiations  that  have  been  dragging  on  the  ratification  of  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan.  Redford  called  the  Calgary  session  a  productive  one.  She  said  the  work  will  continue  on  developing  a  new  partnership  between  the  two  cities  and  the  provincial  government.  Productive  discussion  "The  premier  had  a  very  productive  discussion  with  Mayor  Nenshi  and  Mayor  [Stephen]  Mandel  —  all  three  committed  to  continuing  work  toward  a  new  partnership  that  recognizes  Calgary  and  Edmontons  unique  circumstances,"  said  premier  spokeswoman  Neala  Barton.  "Todays  meeting  was  a  chance  for  the  premier  to  touch  base  with  both  mayors  and,  ensure  work  was  proceeding  well.  It  was  also  an  opportunity  for  her  to  reiterate  her  commitment  to  creating  a  civic  charter  that  serves  all  Albertans  interests."  Barton  said  ensuring  Albertas  largest  urban  centres  continue  on  a  path  of  growth  and  prosperity  only  adds  to  the  provinces  already  strong  economy.  "Ultimately,  a  civic  charter  is  about  creating  a  renewed  relationship  that  will  better  serve  the  residents  of  both  Edmonton  and  Calgary,"  she  said.  "By  continuing  our  work  together,  well  be  able  to  deliver  higher  quality  services  more  seamlessly  and  efficiently  and  create  even  better  conditions  for  economic  growth."  
  12. 12.   12    Forcing  compliance  isnt  answer  Thursday,  March  21,  2013  4:27:56  MDT  PM    Wildrose  Airdrie  MLA  Rob  Anderson  doesn’t  believe  communities  should  be  forced  to  build  ‘stack  ‘em  and  pack  ‘em’  model  of  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP)  and  shouldn’t  be  held  for  ransom  by  threatening  safe  and  stable  access  to  water.    The  Wildrose  official  opposition  house  leader  questioned  Municipal  Affairs  minister  Doug  Griffiths  on  whether  jurisdictions  objecting  to  endorsing  the  plan  will  legislated  to  join  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  during  the  Mar.  20  question  period,  but  said  he  didn’t  receive  a  commitment.  Anderson  asked,  “Will  you  commit  that  you  will  not  legislatively  compel  any  community  to  join  the  CRP,  nor  force  them  to  build  to  the  CRP’s  minimum  density  requirement  of  eight  units  per  acre?”  Anderson’s  question  hit  the  Legislature  floor  just  as  the  mediation  process  has  begun  between  the  CRP  and  two  municipalities  who  take  issue  with  the  metro  plan.  Both  the  Rocky  View  County  and  Municipal  District  of  Foothills  opted  out  of  the  CRP  in  2009,  largely  based  upon  their  objections  to  the  CMP.  They  believe  the  plan  limits  their  authority  on  development  issues  and  constrains  water  licensing.  Anderson  agrees  with  the  stance  being  taken  by  Rocky  View  and  concurs  with  their  reluctance  to  bend  to  a  requirement  to  build  eight  units  per  acre.  He  also  believes  water  shouldn’t  be  used  as  a  bargaining  chip.    “Rocky  View  has  been  very  clear  that  until  the  density  requirements  are  relaxed  and  the  whole  structure  is  changed  that  they  have  issues  with  it.”  Anderson  told  The  Times.    Anderson  agrees  and  believes  people  are  getting  fed  up.  “I  know  the  people  of  Airdrie  are  starting  to  get  tired  of  developments  in  our  community  that  are  trying  to  turn  us  
  13. 13.   13  into  something  we’re  not.  If  we  wanted  to  live  in  Calgary,  great  city,  then  we  would  live  in  Calgary.  But  we  have  chosen  to  live  in  Airdrie  or  Cochrane  or  Chestermere  and  so  forth  because  we  want  a  little  more  space.  I  think  a  lot  of  people  are  getting  tired  of  having  these  ‘stack  ‘em  and  pack  ‘em’  communities  being  wedged  into  our  rural  communities.”  Anderson  recognizes  there  is  a  demand  for  smaller  homes  and  lots  for  low  and  middle-­‐income  families.  What  he  believes  is  each  jurisdiction  should  have  autonomy  when  it  comes  to  making  these  decisions.    “It’s  not  to  say  you  don’t  any  low  income  housing  or  you  don’t  want  any  middle  income  housing,  of  course  you  want  those  things,  but  you  also  want  a  supply  of  middle  income  housing  that  actually  allows  you  to  move  around  a  little  bit,”  said  Anderson.  “The  reasons  you  move  to  a  small  town  are  being  taken  away  because  of  these  silly  requirements  that  places  like  Airdrie  and  Cochrane  now  have  to  build  to  eight  units  per  acre,  which  is  something  you  would  see  in  mid-­‐town  Calgary.”  It  irks  Anderson  to  hear  water  is  being  used  as  a  bargaining  chip  to  force  a  consensus  on  the  plan.    “It’s  wrong  for  the  province  to  say  communities  like  Cochrane,  Airdrie,  Chestermere  and  Rocky  View  have  to  join  against  their  will  a  partnership  that  says  if  you  want  access  to  water  you  have  to  build  the  way  that  we  want  you  to  build.  That  takes  away  autonomy  from  local  residents  and  it’s  a  little  bit  like  having  a  gun  put  to  your  head  and  saying  if  you  want  to  develop,  you  have  to  do  it  our  way  or  you  just  won’t  develop.  You  don’t  have  to  join  us,  but  if  you  don’t  you  won’t  be  able  to  develop.  That  to  me  is  wrong.  Water  is  not  a  bargaining  chip,  water  is  a  right  of  all  citizens.”  Anderson  says  he’s  not  opposed  to  regional  partnerships  but  forcing  issues  important  to  jurisdictions  like  Rocky  View  County  isn’t  the  answer.    “I  like  the  idea  of  regional  partnerships  but  not  when  someone  has  a  gun  to  your  head,  that’s  not  a  partnership,  that’s  a  shake  down  and  it’s  time  for  the  province  to  step  up  and  solve  this  problem,  not  by  forcing  regionalization  but  making  sure  that  all  communities  in  the  Calgary  region  have  access  to  water  and  not  just  Calgary.”  The  mediator  started  discussions  with  the  parties  this  week.  They  met  with  CRP  chairman  Truper  McBride  twice  this  week  and  are  scheduled  to  meet  with  the  CRP  board  on  Friday.  The  mediator  is  also  speaking  with  county  officials.  
  14. 14.   14    Irricana  in  line  for  potential  CRP  transit  study    Mar  11,  2013  03:03  pm  |  By  Thomas  Miller  |  Rocky  View  Weekly  The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  is  working  out  the  feasibility  of  regional  transportation  including  a  potential  bus  loop  running  from  Irricana  to  Airdrie.  Irricana  Councillor  Josh  Taylor  reported  the  potential  for  such  a  bus  loop  during  the  March  4  Town  council  meeting.  Taylor  stated  in  his  report  that  certain  economic  factors  would  have  to  improve  in  order  for  the  bus  loop  to  become  a  reality,  but  said  it’s  great  that  Irricana  is  being  considered.  “Since  we’ve  become  a  member  of  the  CRP,  which  is  about  three  years,  there  has  been  no  thought  of  Irricana  being  helped  by  the  CRP  at  all,”  said  Taylor.  “It’s  very  good  that  Irricana  is  being  taken  seriously  at  CRP  as  a  vital  player  in  this  game.”  Taylor  said  that  the  CRP  could  perform  a  feasibility  study  on  Irricana  within  the  next  few  years.  According  to  Ettore  Iannacito,  the  CRP’s  regional  transportation  manager,  Cochrane  recently  completed  its  feasibility  study,  while  Chestermere  and  Okotoks  are  currently  in  the  process  of  doing  so.  Iannacito  says  they’re  trying  to  look  at  transportation  from  a  regional  perspective  as  opposed  to  individual  municipalities.  “If  the  CRP  had  to  do  it,  how  could  it  be  done  differently?”  said  Iannacito.  “Within  that  context  we  went  and  visited  all  the  municipalities,  the  smaller  municipalities,  because  we  consider  them  all  very  important  and  basically  said  to  them,  if  we  were  able  to  implement  transit  within  the  next  five  to  10  years  or  even  10  to  20  years,  what  would  your  transit  needs  be?”  Iannacito  explained  that  it’s  only  a  hypothetical  scenario  at  the  moment,  but  if  it’s  something  wanted  by  the  people  of  Irricana,  it’s  possible.  However,  Taylor  isn’t  so  sure  Irricana  residents  want  such  a  transportation  system.  He  explained  a  few  years  ago  he  discussed  the  possibility  of  such  a  bus  loop  with  residents  and  the  idea  never  got  off  the  table.  
  15. 15.   15  “I  grew  up  in  a  small  town  …  as  soon  as  you  turn  16  and  you  get  your  driver’s  licence,  that’s  it,  you  don’t  have  to  wait  for  the  bus,”  said  Taylor.  Taylor  expressed  the  town  is  changing  with  more  people  coming  to  Irricana  who  grew  up  in  urban  settings  and  might  be  more  accustomed  to  taking  the  bus.  “If  you  grew  up  in  a  small  town,  your  car  is  a  symbol  of  freedom,”  said  Taylor.  “But  now  with  gas  prices  going  up,  etc.  …  that  will  affect  a  lot  of  people  who  were  not  specifically  raised  in  small  towns  or  rural  Alberta.  They  are  more  used  to  the  convenience  of  taking  the  bus.”  Once  reports  are  completed  in  Chestermere  and  Okotoks,  Irricana  will  be  considered.  
  16. 16.   16    Its  rural  vs.  Calgary  in  regional  plan  Districts  say  theyll  lose  autonomy  if  city  has  its  way  Published  March  7,  2013    by  Suzy  Thompson  in  News          Three  municipal  districts  surrounding  Calgary  are  afraid  Mayor  Naheed  Nenshi  will  succeed  in  forcing  them  to  join  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP).  The  MDs  of  Wheatland,  Rocky  View  and  Foothills  are  digging  in  their  collective  heels  and  refusing  to  sign  on  to  the  CRP  or  its  governing  document,  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP).      In  February,  mayor  Nenshi  scored  headlines  with  his  efforts  to  convince  the  provincial  government  to  create  legislation  that  would  force  the  MDs  to  join,  and  the  ensuing  personal  jabs  between  him  and  Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths.    Now,  the  CRP  and  the  resistant  MDs  are  awaiting  a  provincially  appointed  mediator  to  see  if  the  CMP  can  be  altered  enough  to  entice  them  to  join.      “I  totally  understand  why  he  is  trying  to  pressure  the  provincial  government  into  legislating  the  plan  with  the  three  rurals,  because  Calgary  has  everything  to  gain,  basically,  and  the  rural  municipalities  have  everything  to  lose,”  says  MD  of  Foothills  Reeve  Larry  Spilak.  “Sure,  I  can  understand  his  position,  but  I’m  really  grateful  to  minister  Griffiths  and  the  PC  government  for  defending  the  smaller  rural  municipalities  and  our  autonomy.”        The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  was  formed  in  1999  as  a  way  for  Calgary  and  surrounding  communities  to  collaborate  on  development  and  infrastructure.  Today  there  are  14  members:  Airdrie,  Banff,  Black  Diamond,  Calgary,  Canmore,  Chestermere,  Cochrane,  High  River,  Irricana,  Nanton,  Okotoks,  Redwood  Meadows,  Strathmore  and  
  17. 17.   17  Turner  Valley.    While  all  its  members  agree  it  is  in  everyone’s  best  interests  to  take  the  entire  region  into  account  when  writing  development  plans,  Calgary’s  overwhelming  size  and  clout  is  a  common  sore  spot.    The  CMP  was  approved  in  the  summer  of  2012  after  several  years  of  contentious  negotiations  which  included  the  participation  and  then  withdrawal  of  Rocky  View  and  Foothills  MDs.  Wheatland  did  not  participate,  but  Calgary  wants  all  three  MDs  included.  The  situation  is  still  tense,  as  Nenshi  and  city  council  hold  that  Calgary’s  development  is  hindered  as  long  as  the  MDs  in  question  do  not  sign  onto  the  CMP,  which  is  why  Nenshi  ultimately  asked  the  provincial  government  to  force  their  membership  —  something  Premier  Alison  Redford  says  will  not  happen.      The  MDs  encompass  huge  swaths  of  mainly  rural  land  surrounding  Calgary,  and  include  nearly  every  member  town  in  the  CRP.  Their  main  issue  with  the  partnership  is  what  they  consider  a  guaranteed  loss  of  autonomy.    The  CMP  contains  a  provision  to  force  final  votes  weighted  by  population.  A  decision  made  by  member  communities  accounting  for  50  per  cent  of  the  region’s  population  is  absolute.  With  87  per  cent  of  the  region’s  population,  that  voting  model  gives  Calgary  a  de  facto  veto  on  every  vote.    Resistant  reeves  like  Spilak  and  Rocky  View’s  Rolly  Ashdown  claim  Calgary  is  pushing  the  CMP  because  it  is  intent  on  controlling  the  entire  region’s  infrastructure  and  development  to  the  city’s  advantage.    In  2011,  the  three  MDs  asked  the  Alberta  Association  of  Municipal  Districts  and  Counties  (AAMDC)  to  review  the  CMP  and  come  up  with  recommendations  to  change  it  in  the  MDs’  favour.    Those  recommendations  were  ignored,  as  were  34  amendments  the  MDs  suggested  to  the  CMP  while  it  was  still  being  written  in  2009.    AAMDC  president  Bob  Barss  says  Calgary  is  now  using  its  water  licence  as  leverage  to  compel  communities  to  submit  to  the  CMP.  Calgary  is  licensed  to  draw  enough  water  from  the  Bow  River  to  service  an  estimated  three  million  people.  Surrounding  municipalities  are  capped  at  their  current  allocation  and  need  to  tap  into  Calgary’s  overabundant  supply  in  order  to  grow.      “It  stops  the  growth  of  a  rural  municipality.  [Calgary  has]  enough  water  allocation  just  about  for  all  the  people  in  Alberta,”  says  Barss.  “You  can’t  use  water  as  a  lever,  and  with  that  much  allocation  that’s  what  Calgary  is  doing.  We  know  that  because  of  what  happened  with  Cross  Iron  Mills  and  we  know  that  with  CN  moving  their  offices  and  shops  out  of  Calgary  and  into  the  outskirts  so  they  could  get  into  a  different  water  line.”      Rocky  View  County  had  asked  Calgary  to  connect  the  new  CN  rail  yard  to  the  city’s  supply,  but  the  request  was  denied  and  the  rail  yard  has  since  arranged  to  source  its  water  from  an  irrigation  district.    Whether  water  allocation  is  seen  as  an  incentive  to  join  the  partnership  or  as  punishment  for  failing  to,  it  is  a  real  condition  of  the  CMP.    The  plan  states  “the  City  of  Calgary  is  willing  to  provide  bulk  potable  water  and  wastewater  services  to  members  of  the  CRP  in  order  to  support  the  growth  identified  under  the  auspices  of  the  CMP.”  However,  water  won’t  be  provided  unless  specific  development  conditions  are  accepted,  and  that’s  where  the  MDs  believe  they  are  sacrificing  their  
  18. 18.   18  governance  powers  to  Calgary.      Ashdown  says  the  reason  there  are  no  rural  MDs  in  the  plan  is  because  it  calls  for  cramming  eight  to  10  houses  into  an  acre  in  order  to  receive  services.  “We  don’t  have  40-­‐foot  lots  in  the  country,”  he  says.      In  order  to  qualify  for  Calgary’s  water  under  the  CMP,  member  communities,  even  mainly  rural  districts  like  the  three  MDs  would  be,  must  build  much  denser  residential  communities.      “If  development  continues  at  its  current  pace,  without  co-­‐ordinated  regional  planning,  our  region’s  urban  development  footprint  is  sure  to  increase  dramatically,”  warns  the  CMP.  “By  implementing  the  goals  in  the  Plan,  we  can  expect  to  see  a  70  per  cent  reduction  in  land  used  for  urban  development  in  the  future....  Member  municipalities  will  ensure  that  all  new  development  in  priority  growth  areas  is  compact,  mixed-­‐use;  walkable....  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  acknowledges  the  unique  low-­‐density  lifestyle  choice  that  existing  and  new  hamlets  and  villages  provide  in  our  region,  where  they  can  thrive  without  regional  servicing,”  i.e.  without  tying  in  to  Calgary’s  water  supply.    Calgary’s  offer  of  water-­‐for-­‐compliance  may  eventually  work  with  Rocky  View.  But  because  it  draws  from  the  Sheep  and  Highwood  rivers,  Spilak  says  the  MD  of  Foothills  doesn’t  need  Calgary’s  water  or  its  partnership.  Instead,  Spilak  says  the  MD  will  happily  sign  on  to  the  South  Saskatchewan  Regional  Plan,  which  he  believes  addresses  growth  issues  much  more  appropriately.      “Calgary  does  not  have  us  over  a  barrel  because  we  don’t  require  their  water….  The  CMP  is  an  urban  plan.  It’s  for  urban  planning  and  we’re  a  rural  jurisdiction.  We  do  grow,  of  course,  and  we  develop,  but  on  a  much  different  scale  and  a  much  different  way  than  the  cities  and  towns  do,”  he  explains.      “If  you  can  control  your  municipality,  and  you  can  control  all  the  municipalities  around  you,  you  decide  where  the  growth  goes,  you  decide  where  industry  goes,  you  make  all  the  decisions.  So  it’s  strictly  a  control  issue,”  says  Barss.  “They  definitely  are  not  going  to  get  anywhere  without  a  mediator.”    Redford  and  Griffiths  have  both  promised  the  MDs  they  will  not  be  forced  into  any  agreement  with  Calgary.  Redford  also  told  the  MDs  during  a  tour  of  the  region  in  February  that  Environment  Minister  Diana  McQueen  will  be  visiting  southern  Alberta  in  March  to  discuss  water  supply  issues.  
  19. 19.   19    Rocky  View  County  headed  to  mediation  over  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  Wednesday,  March  6,  2013  11:47:26  MST  AM    The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  is  headed  into  mediation  with  Rocky  View  County  and  the  Municipal  District  of  Foothills  after  again  failing  to  come  to  an  agreement  yet  again  over  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP).  Doug  Griffiths,  Minister  of  Municipal  Affairs,  presented  the  mediation  option  to  the  CRP  and  the  rural  communities  near  the  end  of  February  with  a  no  fail  mandate.  Developed  and  approved  in  2009,  the  CMP  looks  to  address  regional  issues  such  as  infrastructure,  environment,  growth,  local  economy  and  governance.  Rocky  View  and  Foothills  left  after  the  Plan  was  approved  due  to  concerns  about  density,  governance  and  water  and  things  have  come  to  standstill  since.  The  plan  is  basically  a  document  the  province  sees  as  essential  to  long-­‐term  growth  for  the  Calgary  region;  protecting  ecological  systems,  preventing  urban  sprawl  and  building  wise  infrastructure  projects  in  the  area,  for  example.  According  to  Truper  McBride,  chair  of  the  CPR  and  Mayor  of  Cochrane,  the  CRP  has  gone  back  several  times  to  the  communities  to  try  and  come  to  a  compromise.  He  listed  examples  of  rewording  about  density  policies,  servicing  for  public  institutions  and  use  of  the  super-­‐majority  governance  system  as  areas  they  improved  to  get  the  districts  back  on  board,  but  with  no  luck.  “We  think  that  we  did  our  best  attempt  at  trying  to  resolve  the  issues  that  the  rural  municipalities  have  with  the  plan,  it  didn’t  go  far  enough  with  them,”  he  stated,  hence  why  the  provincial  government  has  now  stepped  in.  Rolly  Ashdown,  Reeve  of  Rocky  View  County,  said  while  he  doesn’t  think  eliminating  this  
  20. 20.   20  is  a  goal  of  any  parties  involved,  he  wants  to  ensure  that  each  municipality’s  autonomy  remains  intact  and  that  no  one  is  forced  into  regionalization.  “If  we  want  to  do  a  planning  thing,  we  want  to  make  sure  that  if  it’s  considered  regional  in  nature  that  we  get  to  make  decisions  on  our  county  for  our  taxpayers  the  same  as  everybody  else,  without  anybody  interfering  with  the  ability  or  non-­‐ability  to  do  that.”  McBride  said  the  CRP  wants  to  keep  planning  local  and  that  the  only  regional  function  of  that  would  come  into  effect  when  looking  at  regional  servicing  and  transportation  —  if  an  area  needs  access  to  regional  servicing,  there  has  to  be  in  place  certain  densities  to  achieve  that.  But  that’s  the  sticking  point,  according  to  Ashdown.  While  Rocky  View  has  successful  inter-­‐municipal  committees  with  their  neighbours  in  the  CRP,  he  said  urban  planning  is  different  than  rural  planning  and  that  he’s  still  concerned  his  smaller  municipality  could  be  outvoted  on  governance  issues  by  larger  ones  like  Calgary.  Despite  differences,  both  parties  said  they’re  looking  forward  to  sitting  down  with  the  province  to  reach  an  agreement  and  hearing  what  the  other  has  to  say.  The  CRP  is  currently  made  up  of  14  municipalities,  including  Airdrie.  The  mediation  process  is  set  to  begin  in  early  March,  but  dates  have  yet  to  be  set  by  the  province.  A  resolution  is  expected  by  June.        
  21. 21.   21    CRP,  County,  Province  mediation  promising    Mar  04,  2013  01:33  pm  We  are  cautiously  optimistic  about  the  Province’s  proposed  mediation  solution  inviting  Rocky  View  County  to  become  a  part  of  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP).  (See  story  on  page  1).  As  Rocky  View  County  Reeve  Rolly  Ashdown  pointed  out,  in  the  past,  the  CRP  has  tried  to  bully  the  County  into  joining  the  cooperative.  The  County  voted  to  leave  the  CRP  in  2009  because  of  concerns  about  governance,  density  and  water.  The  council  of  the  day  felt  the  governance  mandate  of  the  CRP,  or  voting  structure,  threatened  municipal  autonomy;  residential  development  densities  of  between  eight  and  10  units  per  acre  did  not  fit  into  a  rural  lifestyle  and  wanted  to  explore  the  opportunity  of  being  a  part  of  a  regional  water  and  wastewater  service.  We  are  glad  to  see  the  groups  entering  into  talks  again  with  the  Province  as  a  mediator  and  hope  they  are  more  productive  and  fair  than  they  have  been  in  the  past.  The  one  thing  that  has  us  worried  is  the  fact  the  CRP  chair  claims  the  minister  of  municipal  affairs  has  said  the  “process  will  not  be  allowed  to  fail.”  We  can  only  hope  this  doesn’t  mean  the  Province  plans  to  force  the  municipality  to  join  the  partnership  even  if  it  is  not  in  its  residents’  best  interest.  We  agree  the  Calgary  Region  needs  an  over  arching  plan  that  will  guide  growth  into  the  future.  However,  we  feel  it  is  imperative  that  the  plan  works  for  all  parties  involved.  Rocky  View  County  and  the  Municipal  District  of  Foothills  contain  a  large  majority  of  the  residents  in  the  Calgary  area.  This  plan  will  guide  how  their  land,  resources  and  government  works  and  will  indirectly  shape  how  they  live.  
  22. 22.   22    Province  offers  mediation  to  CRP,  rural  municipalities    Mar  04,  2013  01:28  pm  |  By  Dawn  Smith  |  Rocky  View  Weekly    Rocky  View  County  has  been  invited  to  accept  the  mediation  solution  to  become  part  of  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  presented  by  Doug  Griffiths,  the  minister  of  municipal  affairs.  Griffiths  penned  a  letter  in  late  January,  outlining  the  terms  in  a  bid  to  bring  the  rural  municipalities  of  Rocky  View  and  Foothills  back  into  the  CRP  fold.  Pending  agreement  by  the  rurals,  mediation  is  set  to  begin  in  March  and  is  expected  to  be  completed  by  the  end  of  June,  according  to  a  CRP  blog  post  dated  Feb.  22.  When  Rocky  View  voted  to  leave  the  CRP  in  2009,  it  was  over  concerns  about  governance,  density  and  water.  Reeve  Rolly  Ashdown  said  the  County  is  looking  forward  to  the  mediation  process.  “Usually  what  happens  when  we  get  together  with  the  CRP  is  they  have  already  decided  what  will  work  for  Rocky  View,”  he  said.  “This  is  the  first  time  we  will  actually  sit  down  with  them.  We  don’t  have  a  problem  getting  together  with  people,  it’s  great.”  CRP  Chair  and  Cochrane  Mayor  Truper  McBride  is  also  optimistic  about  the  process.  “We  have  tried  to  resolve  the  outstanding  issues  with  the  rurals  in  the  past,  (but)  we  weren’t  able  to  come  up  with  a  resolution  ourselves,”  he  said.  “What  has  changed  is  the  Province  has  decided  to  take  a  lead  on  this.We  are  very  pleased  the  minister  has  stepped  forward.”  McBride  said  the  CRP  is  waiting  to  hear  from  the  rural  municipalities,  but  said  he  suspects  all  the  parties  will  want  to  take  part  in  the  process  to  ensure  the  success  of  the  CRP’s  long-­‐range  growth  plan  for  the  Calgary  region,  entitled  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP).  He  added  the  minister  told  him  the  “process  will  not  be  allowed  to  fail.”  Jerry  Ward,  public  affairs  officer  for  Alberta’s  municipal  affairs  department,  confirmed  the  letters  had  been  sent  to  all  CRP  partner  municipalities,  as  well  as  Rocky  View  County  
  23. 23.   23  and  the  Municipal  District  of  Foothills.  “It  was  basically  to  move  the  process  forward,”  he  said,  adding  the  letters  were  penned  Jan.  28.  “The  (CMP)  is  a  priority  of  our  government  and  the  Province  has  supported  the  partnership  in  developing  the  plan.  “Failure  to  include  the  rurals,  which  represent  a  large  majority  of  the  residents  in  the  Calgary  area,  is  a  big  concern  for  the  effectiveness  of  the  plan.”  The  CMP  was  approved  by  the  CRP  in  2009,  and  has  been  awaiting  the  Province’s  approval  for  nearly  four  years.  “We  need  everyone  working  together  to  prepare  for  the  more  than  three  million  people  (double  the  current  population)  expected  to  live  in  the  Calgary  Region  over  the  next  60  years,”  stated  the  blog  post,  located  online  at  www.calgaryregion.ca    
  24. 24.   24    TV  show  puts  Chestermere  in  the  limelight    Mar  04,  2013  01:33  pm  |  By  Thomas  Miller  |  Rocky  View  Weekly  Chestermere  is  getting  cross-­‐continent  exposure.  The  Today  in  America  TV  program  recently  featured  Chestermere  in  a  hidden  gems  segment.  Terry  Bradshaw,  a  television  personality  famous  for  leading  the  Pittsburgh  Steelers  to  four  Super  Bowls  in  the  1970s  and  1980s,  is  the  host  of  the  program,  which  airs  on  a  number  of  different  networks  including  BNN,  CNN  and  Discovery.  Chestermere  Mayor  Patricia  Matthews  said  she  worked  with  the  Chestermere  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  to  find  the  right  people  to  speak  about  Chestermere  as  a  destination  for  viewers.  Even  Olympic  gold  medallist  John  Morris  pitched  in  as  a  spokesperson  for  Chestermere  in  the  segment.  Morris  is  occupied  at  the  moment  by  the  Tim  Hortons  Brier,  where  he’s  competing  as  the  third  on  Team  Martin.  But  Matthews  says  Morris  has  always  been  the  perfect  spokesperson  for  Chestermere.  “He  is  a  fantastic  community  supporter,”  said  the  mayor  of  the  Olympian.  “John  works  with  our  Big  Brothers  Big  Sisters  program,  he  comes  out  and  mentors  some  of  the  kids  with  the  youth  curling,  he’s  at  every  event  we’ve  ever  asked  to  be  at.  “He  sacrifices  a  lot  for  our  community,  we  couldn’t  ask  for  a  better  spokesman.”  Along  with  Matthews  and  Morris,  Andrew  Marriott,  owner  of  a  Tim  Hortons  franchise  in  Chestermere,  Graeme  Melton,  land  development  manager  for  Melcor  Developments,  and  Kyle  Wilson  of  Wilson  Master  Media  participated  in  the  video  to  champion  Chestermere.  Wilson  has  been  a  Chestermere  resident  since  1989  and  he’s  seen  the  town  grow,  especially  in  the  business  sector.  “One  of  the  reasons  I  decided  to  start  a  business  out  there  within  the  marketing  industry  is  that  I’ve  seen  a  lot  of  businesses  come  and  go  throughout  the  years  and  that  was  really  my  initiative  to  put  programs  together  where  I  can  help  contribute  to  get  
  25. 25.   25  these  businesses  names  out  there,”  said  Wilson.  “In  recent  years,  it’s  been  very  successful  …  businesses  are  sticking  around.  It’s  growing  a  lot  and  that’s  what  I  like  to  see.  “Chestermere  is  definitely  expanding  and  now  that  we  have  a  lot  of  foundational  things  in  place  such  as  the  schools,  the  banks,  the  gas  stations,  I’m  really  hoping  to  see  a  lot  more  retail  come  in  there  and  I  believe  that  it’s  a  great,  absolutely  amazing  community  to  be  able  to  start  a  business,  especially  with  all  the  future  initiatives  the  Town  has  in  place.”  Matthews  says  the  Town  was  able  to  work  with  the  TV  program  on  where  it  would  air  –  they  wanted  particular  airings  in  Texas,  Vancouver  and  Victoria.  “Texas  is  a  big  supporter  of  Alberta  and  vice  versa,”  said  Matthews.  “So  we  thought  that  would  provide  us  with  the  most  potential.  “This  will  bring  more  opportunity  not  only  for  our  current  businesses,  but  bring  future  business  to  town,  too.  The  chance  to  get  out  there  and  get  people  to  get  a  better  understanding  of  who  we  are  as  a  community  on  a  continent-­‐wide  scale  is  not  something  that  comes  along  very  often.”  To  view  the  segment  online,  visit  www.chestermere.ca  
  26. 26.   26      February  28,  2013  Updated:  February  28,  2013  |  8:08  pm  Calgary  regional  mediation  won’t  include  Wheatland  County  By  Robson  Fletcher  Metro  Calgary  Wheatland  County  is  refusing  to  take  part  in  mediation  over  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan,  but  the  province  plans  to  press  ahead  with  the  process  regardless.  “We  don’t  want  to  participate,”  Reeve  Glenn  Koester  told  Metro.  “There’s  nothing  the  city  has  to  offer  us.  So  why  would  we  want  to  be  in  the  mediation?”  Wheatland  County,  along  with  Rocky  View  County  and  the  Municipal  District  of  Foothills,  are  not  part  of  the  plan  and  don’t  currently  sit  on  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership,  which  voted  last  week  to  participate  in  the  mediation.  Both  Rocky  View  Reeve  Rolly  Ashdown  and  Foothills  Reeve  Larry  Spilak  told  Metro  this  week  their  municipalities  are  willing  to  take  part  in  mediation,  although  their  concerns  remain  the  same  over  an  effective  “veto”  they  say  the  plan  gives  Calgary  over  regional  decisions.  Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths  announced  the  mediation  process  in  February,  saying  he  hoped  it  would  “help  resolve  this  once  and  for  all.”  Municipal  Affairs  spokesman  Jerry  Wary  said  Thursday  Wheatland  County  need  not  necessarily  be  involved.  “The  minister  has  been  contemplating  whether  Wheatland  needs  to  be  included  in  the  mediation,  given  its  relative  distance  from  the  city,”  he  said.  Details  on  the  mediation  are  still  being  sorted  out  but  Ward  said  it  should  “get  underway  pretty  soon”  as  Griffiths  hopes  to  have  a  report  on  the  process  by  June.  Background:  • The  Calgary  Metropolitian  Plan  led  the  recent,  public  spat  between  Mayor  Naheed  Nenshi  and  Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths.  • Nenshi  wants  the  province  to  legislate  holdout  municipalities  into  the  regional  plan,  but  the  province  has  said  it  won’t  do  that.  • Members  of  Calgary  City  Council  believe  the  lack  of  agreement  is  hindering  the  city’s  own  development  plans.  
  27. 27.   27  •  • CRP  agrees  to  mediation  with  surrounding  municipalities  •  • By:  Derek  Clouthier  •    |    Posted:  Wednesday,  Feb  27,  2013  11:33  am  • The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  has  agreed  to  enter  into  a  mediation  process  in  an  attempt  to  bring  surrounding  municipalities  to  the  table  and  reach  an  agreement  on  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP).  • The  CRP  developed  the  CMP,  which  was  approved  in  2009,  to  establish  a  framework  to  guide  the  region  forward  to  ensure  growth  occurs  in  a  sustainable  manner.  • Some  regions,  however,  including  Rocky  View  County  (RVC)  and  the  M.D.  of  Foothills,  chose  not  to  join  the  collaborative  network,  sitting  now  at  14  members  and  includes  the  municipalities  of  Cochrane,  Canmore,  Redwood  Meadows  and  Airdrie,  among  others.  • Rolly  Ashdown,  RVC  reeve,  said  the  county  elected  to  remain  on  the  sidelines  because  of  two  main  factors:  densities  and  governance.  • Ashdown  said  density  suggestions  by  the  CRP  –  eight  to  10  units  per  acre  –  do  not  mesh  with  the  rural  setting  of  the  county.  • The  CRP’s  method  of  governance,  which  for  a  vote  to  pass  requires  the  majority  of  its  members  and  50  per  cent  of  the  population,  is  another  point  of  contention  for  Ashdown,  who  pointed  out  that  Calgary  alone  holds  over  50  per  cent  of  the  CRP’s  population,  leaving  all  other  member  communities  on  the  outside  looking  in.  • Truper  McBride,  Cochrane  mayor  and  CRP  chair,  said  he  hopes  an  agreement  will  be  reached  on  the  plan.  • “We  all  certainly  want  to  have  the  rural  municipalities  come  back  to  the  partnership,”  he  said.  • McBride  added  that  the  CMP  does  not  dictate  levels  of  growth  to  any  specific  municipality,  and  that  each  identifies  its  own  growth  centres,  and  that  is  then  reflected  in  the  plan.  • McBride  also  said  that  if  mediation  fails,  the  provincial  government  will  then  take  it  upon  itself  to  find  a  solution.  • Density  and  governance  aside,  Ashdown  is  optimistic  about  the  upcoming  mediation  process.  • “This  is  a  very  good  thing,”  he  said.  “This  would  be  our  first  opportunity  to  sit  at  the  table.”  • The  suggestion  to  enter  into  mediation  was  presented  to  the  CRP  by  Alberta’s  minister  of  municipal  affairs,  Doug  Griffiths.  
  28. 28.   28  • Rural  municipalities  must  also  agree  to  enter  into  the  mediation  process,  which  is  set  to  commence  in  March  and  conclude  by  June.  • The  CRP  said  in  a  media  release  that  it  hopes  RVC  and  the  M.D.  of  Foothills  can  reach  an  agreement  on  the  CMP.  • “We  need  everyone  working  together  to  prepare  for  the  more  than  three  million  people  expected  to  live  in  the  Calgary  region  over  the  next  60  years,”  the  release  indicated.  “This  mediation  should  be  the  end  of  a  long  process  of  negotiations.”  • The  CRP  pointed  toward  what  it  called  ‘several  efforts’  to  bring  rural  municipalities  to  the  discussion  table  over  the  years,  but  said  none  of  the  offers  or  proposed  amendments  to  the  CMP  were  accepted  by  RVC  or  the  M.D.    
  29. 29.   29    Ashdown  details  county  ambitions    By  James  Emery,  Airdrie  Echo  Wednesday,  February  27,  2013  11:27:01  MST  AM    Complex  growth  issues,  major  transportation  routes  and  access  to  large  labour  pools  to  fish  from  to  support  local  businesses  are  all  things  Airdrie  and  Rocky  View  County  (RVC)  have  in  common.  That  was  the  message  Rolly  Ashdown,  reeve  of  RVC,  brought  to  the  podium  when  he  gave  his  first-­‐ever  State  of  the  County  address  at  the  Woodside  Golf  Course  in  Airdrie  last  Wednesday.  “It’s  a  great  way  to  let  people  know  the  realities  (in  the  county),”  Ashdown  explained.  “A  lot  of  people  speculate  on  what  the  county  is  doing  and  what  they’re  not  doing.”  Ashdown  addressed  the  Airdrie  Chamber  of  Commerce  during  their  most  recent  networking  luncheon.  He  touched  on  a  variety  of  regional  projects,  a  large  portion  of  which  directly  involved  Airdrie  or  neighbouring  communities.  In  Balzac,  Ashdown  gushed  about  the  1.3-­‐million  sq.-­‐ft  Target  Distribution  Centre  that  recently  opened  and  how  it’s  increasing  job  opportunities  in  the  region.  He  said  the  centre  currently  has  250  employees  and  that  is  expected  to  double  in  the  coming  years.  “Then  they  can  come  back  here  and  spend  money  on  all  of  the  things  you  had  in  mind  for  people  spending  money  on,”  he  said.  “I  hope  that  works  out  really  well  for  Airdrie,  because  it’s  worked  so  great  for  Rocky  View  County.”  
  30. 30.   30  Meanwhile,  he  brought  everyone  up  to  speed  on  a  few  other  projects,  including  the  Balzac  Fire  Station,  which  became  operational  last  year  near  the  CrossIron  Mills  mall.  As  well,  he  was  excited  for  a  new  project  in  Madden  that  will  see  an  18-­‐hole  golf  course,  21  room  hotel  and  banquet  facility  as  well  as  15  individual  cabins  constructed  in  the  hamlet  northwest  of  Airdrie.  Ashdown  also  took  the  time  to  quell  what  he  said  was  misinformation  regarding  the  construction  of  a  county  municipal  building.  Currently,  RVC  headquarters  is  off  32nd  avenue  in  Calgary  in  a  1970s  building  that  is  “tired  and  small,”  Ashdown  said.  He  wanted  to  make  clear  that  RVC  had  not  approved  a  municipal  building  and  that  the  county  had  not  thought  about  it  “too  deeply.”  He  said  the  county  does  have  a  $30  million  budget  in  mind  if  they  do  eventually  move.  And  if  the  county  sold  their  headquarters  now,  they  would  get  roughly  $20  million,  Ashdown  noted.  “It’s  not  a  bad  deal  for  us  to  spend  some  money,  get  something  that  actually  fits  for  us,  relocate  in  Rocky  View  County,  which  reduces  costs  of  fuel  and  gives  us  the  ability  not  to  have  to  lease  extra  space,”  Ashdown  said.  Ashdown  also  spoke  of  the  completed  road  project  at  Range  Road  292,  part  of  an  annexation  agreement  that  saw  Airdrie  grow  by  approximately  12,000  acres,  Ashdown  noted,  saying  he  hoped  it  was  enough  for  the  city  to  expand  further.  “Hopefully  it  does,  but  if  it  doesn’t,  we  have  about  1,000,000  acres  —  you  can  have  some  more,”  he  laughed.  The  reeve  also  addressed  why  the  county  pays  Airdrie  $170,000  per  year  for  recreation  through  a  cost  sharing  agreement.  “We  recognize  that  our  people  use  your  facilities,”  he  explained,  citing  Genesis  Place  as  a  key  example.  “It  gives  us  the  ability  to  not  build  multi-­‐million  dollar  facilities  for  only  a  few  hundred  thousand  dollars  and  gives  our  people  the  same  benefit.  I  can’t  imagine  changing  that.”  Ashdown  was  also  hopeful  the  proposed  casino  and  racetrack  in  Balzac  would  be  approved  and  be  opened  by  2014.  He  also  updated  those  in  attendance  with  status  of  the  County  Plan.  The  planning  document,  perhaps  better  known  as  a  Municipal  Development  Plan,  is  set  
  31. 31.   31  to  be  put  before  council  in  early  June  and  approved  by  June  11  following  months  of  public  consultations  across  the  county  to  solicit  feedback  on  what  issues  residents  are  most  concerned  about.  It  details  policies,  programs  and  projects  to  guide  county  development  and  services  over  the  next  decade,  Ashdown  said.  “We’re  going  to  show  the  residents  of  Rocky  View  County  what  we’ve  discovered  came  from  them  so  we  make  sure  we  got  it  right,”  he  said.  Ashdown  also  fielded  questions  and  was  asked  about  why  the  county  isn’t  participating  in  the  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  and  the  future  of  water  in  RVC.  “The  CRP  is  a  great  idea,  it’s  going  to  end  up  being  legislation  some  day,”  he  responded.  “Regional  planning  is  coming  —  we’re  not  going  to  be  able  to  avoid  it.  It’s  a  good  thing.”  But  he  said  for  now,  servicing  and  government  issues  continue  to  be  the  two  main  sticking  points  as  to  why  they’re  resistant  to  return  to  the  CRP.  As  for  water,  Ashdown  said  “there’s  water  everywhere.”  “What  we  have  now  is  way  more  than  what  we  need,”  he  said.  “It’s  enough  to  service  water  in  Rocky  View  County’s  area  to  cover  debt  of  infrastructure  that  brought  us  this  business.”  
  32. 32.   32    Mediation  for  the  CRP    By  Marco  Vigliotti,  High  River  Times  Friday,  March  1,  2013  1:44:17  MST  PM  Municipal  Affairs  Minister  Doug  Griffiths  says  he’s  confident  an  independent  mediator  will  be  able  to  broker  a  solution  to  a  longstanding  dispute  over  an  expansive  50-­‐year  plan  for  the  Calgary  region.    He  said  the  dispute  between  three  rural  municipalities  -­‐including  the  MD  of  Foothills-­‐  and  ostensibly  the  City  of  Calgary  over  the  Calgary  Metropolitan  Plan  (CMP)  will  be  solved  by  the  end  of  the  mediation  process,  as  the  provincial  government  will  not  allow  the  feuding  communities  to  come  up  short.    “There  will  be  cooperation”  between  the  municipalities  and  mediation  will  resolve  the  dispute,  he  told  a  Feb  14.  conference  of  municipal  politicians.  Griffiths  said  last  month  the  government  would  hold  mediated  talks  over  the  contentious  plan  -­‐which  is  supposed  to  govern  the  future  of  growth,  water  and  transit  for  a  wide  spanning  area  stretching  from  Banff  to  Nanton-­‐  rejecting  pleas  from  Calgary  Mayor  Naheed  Nenshi  to  legislate  the  plan  without  the  consent  of  the  objecting  municipalities.    The  Calgary  Regional  Partnership  (CRP)  -­‐the  group  designing  the  CMP-­‐  voted  at  their  Feb.  22  meeting  to  accept  Griffiths’  plans  for  mediation,  posting  a  message  on  their  website  that  talks  will  begin  this  March  and  wrap  up  by  June.  The  CRP  is  made  up  of  every  major  urban  municipality  in  the  broader  region  including  the  City  of  Calgary,  the  Town  of  Okotoks  and  The  Town  of  High  River.  The  MD  of  Foothills,  Rocky  View  County  and  Wheatland  County  left  the  group  back  in  2009  over  concerns  about  the  control  the  City  of  Calgary  will  have  over  future  development  in  their  jurisdictions  under  the  CMP.  The  rural  municipalities  say  Calgary  overwhelming  dictates  the  CRP  and  worry  the  City  will  be  able  to  veto  any  future  development  that  goes  against  their  plans  to  limit  growth  to  already  developed  areas  in  the  region.  Calgary  representatives  say  limiting  growth  to  densely  populated  corridors  will  allow  for  better  regional  integration  and  ultimately  save  money,  as  communities  won’t  have  to  fund  costly  infrastructure  projects-­‐including  new  roads-­‐  to  service  disparate  areas.  

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