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What is Design?
 

What is Design?

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Lecture I give at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering

Lecture I give at the Copenhagen University College of Engineering

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    What is Design? What is Design? Presentation Transcript

    • HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN? HAT IS DESIGN?
    • Good design is an...
    • According to wikipedia.org engineering is: “The application of scientific and mathematical principles to practical ends such as the design, manufacture, and operation of efficient and economical structures, machines, processes and systems.”
    • According to the ICSID (International Council of Societies of Industrial Design): “Design is a creative activity whose aim is to establish the multi-faceted qualities of objects, processes, services and their systems in whole life-cycles. Therefore, design is the central fac- tor of innovative humanization of technologies and the crucial factor of cultural and economic exchange”
    • Engineering thinking is generally more linear and mechanistic and design thinking is generally more holistic and intuitive.
    • Design is informed by this context...: Language, Semiotics and Aesthetics Innovation and Creativity Sculpting and Drawing DESIGN Strategy and Branding Science, Technology and Engineering Sociology, Psychology and Anthropology
    • PRODUCT PSYCOLOGICAL IMAGE MIND ARTIFACT STORIES EMOTIONAL BODY AESTHETICS PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT CONTENT CONTEXT FUNCTIONAL inherent or silent knowledge CULTURE CULTURAL CULTURAL SYMBOLICAL BRAND SOCIAL BRAND RETAIL SPACE COMMERCIAL
    • WHAT CAN BE DESIGNED?
    • objects spaces information symbols processes data representations services systems...
    • DATA REPRESENTATION
    • SYMBOL
    • PRODUCT OR SERVICE SYSTEM COMPONENT?
    • Design is the innovative humanization of technology... how to “humanize technology”?
    • by creating intuitive and ergonomic products and services...
    • by creating an attractive sensorial experience...
    • Vision Audio
    • Touch and smell
    • body senses...
    • by creating meaningful products that reflects or symbolizes brand and user identity
    • INNOVATIVE: USABILITY, AESTHETICS, MEANING
    • DOES FORM FOLLOW FUNCTION?
    • brief: Create an object that will keep a person seperated from the ground in a “seated” position.
    • ...The chair designers made an interpretation of technology, materials, brand identity, fashion trends, function, ergonomic needs, genre, media, social rituals, user context, user cultures and user identity... etc. So form follows interpretation of a multitude of parameters... among them function...
    • Examples of the interpretation of a generic object, archetype or genre
    • Poul Kjærholm - PK 91
    • Karl Grøndal - BrightShade
    • Ex: brand values
    • UNCOMPROMISING, EXTREME AND ITALIAN
    • ‘Design is not just about making something, it is about designing the feelings of the person who uses it,” says Tokujin Yoshioka, a japanese designer
    • WHAT MAKES GOOD DESIGN?
    • Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design: attractive innovative accessible environmentally responsible useful honest refined unobtrusive durable with “as little design as possible.”
    • Other things that make good design...
    • meaningful design (identity)...
    • humorous design ...
    • extreme design ...
    • Products that are designed for the context in which it is used: the physical and social environment
    • and... convenient, surprising, mysterious, dramatic, cool... design etc...
    • And now...
    • Product design analysis
    • Human factors Can you percive how the product should be used, from the design (af- fordance)? Does the product have a logical interface? An interface can also be a han- dle or door knob... Does the product provide feedback? Ex: a red light shows that it is off, or a button make a click sound, when you push it... Is the product ergonomically suitable? Does the product fit the body? Is the product easy to maintain? Is it accesible? Can people with a physical handicap, or other challenged people operate and use the product?
    • Aesthetics Is the product a positive sensorial experience - sight, sound, smell, touch, weight? Can the target user group identify with the aesthetics - does it express the right values? Is any “design resources” as: contrast, balance, symmetri, assymetri etc., applied?
    • Design Innovation Is the product a “game changer”? Materials? Ex: Is material use innovative? Product category? Technology? Manufacturing technology? User interface? Aesthetics?
    • Brand design and product semiotics Does the product express the brand values? Is the aesthetic experience in sync with the brand promise? Is the product part of a product family? Does it fit in? Is the product symbolic?
    • Physical context Is the product suitable for the physical environment the products is used in? Social context Does the product part of any social relations or rituals? If yes, is it suitable? Does the product give the owner prestige or respect among his/her peers?
    • Manufacturing • Manufacturing quality? • Manufacturing technology? Sustainability • How does the product contaminate the environment - close or near? • Does the product pose any other health hazards?
    • Functions • List the functions. Ex: a wrist watch: Time info, date info, time setting, flexible wrist attach- ment, water sealing, shock resistance, auto luminiscent indicators, auto- matic clockwork, accesssory etc...
    • Assignment: Each group will select 3 objects. Share with other groups. Discuss and compare the objects - be critical! Talk about all the subjects on the list. Try to improve 1 product - make a sketch or model and specify it in text. Each group will make a 3 - 7 min. informal presentation of their analysis - and their suggestions for improvements - today.
    • Suggestions for products: Cars Cameras Kitchen utensils - knives, blenders, toasters etc. Computer mouse Bluetooth headsets Power tools Furniture Phones Toilets Pens