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Olympic rings significance

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  • Thank you Karin!
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  • Εξαιρετική δουλειά, φίλε Καρίν!!! Ευχαριστούμε πολύ, Νίκος.
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  • This is a timely presentation. Not that it coincides with the Olympic games, but also reminds us of the connection between businesses and sports. Faster, higher, stronger is the motto of Olympics that businesses need to remember and apply. I downloaded the presentation to enjoy the great music. Well-done, Karin
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  • 1. OLYMPIC RINGS Significance
  • 2. The five Olympic rings represent the five continentsinvolved in the Olympics and were designed in 1912, adopted in June 1914 and debuted at the 1920 Antwerp Olympics.The symbol of the Olympic Games is composed of fiveinterlocking rings, coloured blue, yellow, black, green, and red on a white field. This was originally designedin 1912 by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympic Games. Upon its initial introduction, de Coubertin stated the following in the August, 1912 edition of Olympique.
  • 3. The Olympic motto is the hendiatris Citius, Altius, Fortius, which is Latin for "Faster, Higher, Stronger". The motto was proposed by Pierre de Coubertin on the creation of the International Olympic Committee in 1894. De Coubertin borrowed it from his friend Henri Didon, a Dominican priest who, amongst other things, was an athleticsenthusiast. The motto was introduced in 1924 at the Olympic Games in Paris. A more informal but well known motto, also introduced by De Coubertin, is "The most important thing is not to win but to take part!" De Coubertin got this motto from a sermon by the Bishop of Pennsylvania during the 1908 London Games.
  • 4. ENDE ALLE RECHTE AN DIESER PRÄSENTATION,INSBESONDERE DIE AUF BEARBEITUNG UND UMGESTALTUNG LIEGEN BEIM AUTOR… K & H PPS Fotos: from Web Music: : Jive Medley http://www.slideshare.net/karinchen51

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