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What is Cancer? Up to 10 million new cases a year worldwide Classifies a family of diseases of unrestrained cell growth
G 1 G 2 S (DNA synthesis) 1 - INTERPHASE – cell growth, copying of  Chromosomes Cytokinesis 2 - MITOTIC (M) PHASE Mitosis ...
LE 12-14 G 1  checkpoint G 1 S M M checkpoint G 2  checkpoint G 2 Control system
LE 12-15 G 1 G 1  checkpoint G 1 G 0 I f a cell receives a go-ahead signal at the G 1  checkpoint, the cell continues on i...
Stop and Go Signs: Internal and External Signals at the Checkpoints <ul><li>M phase checkpoint  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An i...
LE 12-17 Petri plate Scalpels Without PDGF With PDGF Without PDGF With PDGF 10 mm
<ul><li>Another example of external signals is density-dependent inhibition, in which crowded cells stop dividing </li></u...
LE 12-18a Cells anchor to dish surface and divide (anchorage dependence). When cells have formed a complete single layer, ...
LE 12-18b Cancer cells do not exhibit anchorage dependence or density-dependent inhibition. Cancer cells 25 µm
Loss of Cell Cycle Controls in Cancer Cells <ul><li>Cancer cells do not respond normally to the body’s control mechanisms ...
LE 12-19 Cancer cell Blood vessel Lymph vessel Tumor Glandular tissue Metastatic tumor A tumor grows from a single cancer ...
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What is cancerfor edu285

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Transcript of "What is cancerfor edu285"

  1. 1. What is Cancer? Up to 10 million new cases a year worldwide Classifies a family of diseases of unrestrained cell growth
  2. 2. G 1 G 2 S (DNA synthesis) 1 - INTERPHASE – cell growth, copying of Chromosomes Cytokinesis 2 - MITOTIC (M) PHASE Mitosis Phases of the Cell Cycle
  3. 3. LE 12-14 G 1 checkpoint G 1 S M M checkpoint G 2 checkpoint G 2 Control system
  4. 4. LE 12-15 G 1 G 1 checkpoint G 1 G 0 I f a cell receives a go-ahead signal at the G 1 checkpoint, the cell continues on in the cell cycle. If a cell does not receive a go-ahead signal at the G 1 checkpoint, the cell exits the cell cycle and goes into G 0 , a nondividing state . The G 1 checkpoint seems to be the most important one
  5. 5. Stop and Go Signs: Internal and External Signals at the Checkpoints <ul><li>M phase checkpoint </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An internal signal - chromosomal misalignment send a molecular signal that delays anaphase </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Some external signals are growth factors, proteins released by certain cells that stimulate other cells to divide </li></ul><ul><li>For example, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the division of human fibroblast cells in culture </li></ul>
  6. 6. LE 12-17 Petri plate Scalpels Without PDGF With PDGF Without PDGF With PDGF 10 mm
  7. 7. <ul><li>Another example of external signals is density-dependent inhibition, in which crowded cells stop dividing </li></ul><ul><li>Most animal cells also exhibit anchorage dependence, in which they must be attached to a substratum in order to divide </li></ul>
  8. 8. LE 12-18a Cells anchor to dish surface and divide (anchorage dependence). When cells have formed a complete single layer, they stop dividing (density-dependent inhibition). If some cells are scraped away, the remaining cells divide to fill the gap and then stop (density-dependent inhibition). 25 µm Normal mammalian cells
  9. 9. LE 12-18b Cancer cells do not exhibit anchorage dependence or density-dependent inhibition. Cancer cells 25 µm
  10. 10. Loss of Cell Cycle Controls in Cancer Cells <ul><li>Cancer cells do not respond normally to the body’s control mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Cancer cells form tumors, masses of abnormal cells within otherwise normal tissue </li></ul><ul><li>If abnormal cells remain at the original site, the lump is called a benign tumor </li></ul><ul><li>Malignant tumors invade surrounding tissues and can metastasize, exporting cancer cells to other parts of the body, where they may form secondary tumors </li></ul>
  11. 11. LE 12-19 Cancer cell Blood vessel Lymph vessel Tumor Glandular tissue Metastatic tumor A tumor grows from a single cancer cell. Cancer cells invade neighboring tissue. Cancer cells spread through lymph and blood vessels to other parts of the body. A small percentage of cancer cells may survive and establish a new tumor in another part of the body.
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