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The changing scholarly communication landscape Research and Information Skills Training  Library & Learning Centre Univers...
Quick check <ul><li>A.  I have published articles and/or presented at conferences? </li></ul><ul><li>B. I am in the proces...
Research output at the  University of Bath <ul><li>2005-August 2007:  Over 1300 articles published in journals covered by ...
Overview <ul><li>Aim:  To raise awareness of the changing landscape of scholarly communication. </li></ul><ul><li>Audience...
Scholarly communication <ul><li>Describe the steps to publishing an article in a journal. </li></ul><ul><li>What is produc...
Scholarly communication <ul><li>Author writes paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits paper to journal </li></ul><ul><li>Ed...
<ul><li>There’s no scholarship without scholarly communication.  (Paul Courant qtd by Clifford Lynch, 2006) </li></ul><ul>...
Scholarly Communication <ul><li>Characteristics of “traditional” model: </li></ul><ul><li>Not written for direct compensat...
Traditional Publishing Models <ul><li>Commercial publishers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access via paid subscriptions from libra...
Why look for alternatives? <ul><li>Libraries want relief from journal prices </li></ul><ul><li>Authors want impact </li></...
 
How does the cost of journals impact on Scholarly Communication? <ul><li>Leads to cancellation of journal titles in HE lib...
Licence Restrictions: Authors <ul><li>Publisher contracts can place restrictions on content: </li></ul><ul><li>Who may use...
Licence Restrictions: Institutions <ul><li>Failure of institutions to get full value from what is paid for: </li></ul><ul>...
Some responses by HE <ul><li>Library consortia negotiations with publishers for better pricing and licensing terms </li></...
Alternative publishing models <ul><li>Open Access (OA) </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly articles/works are freely accessible to...
Open Access (OA) Journals <ul><li>Re Open Access:  I can see why libraries are behind this but as the open access model is...
Messages to authors <ul><li>Association of American Publishers (AAP) and members, John Wiley & Sons, Reed Elsevier and the...
Messages to authors <ul><li>Research funders are requiring that sponsored research be publicly available. </li></ul><ul><l...
Research Funder Policies
OA journal models <ul><li>Delayed OA  (embargoed) </li></ul><ul><li>Hybrid OA  ie.  Springer Open Choice  and  Blackwell O...
Benefits of OA journals? <ul><li>Advances goals of scholarly communication </li></ul><ul><li>Free access for any viewer on...
Advantages for authors <ul><li>Wider dissemination and readership than currently permitted in high priced journal titles <...
Disadvantages: <ul><li>Author or funding bodies required to pay for publishing </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing in non-traditi...
Open Access and Self Archiving <ul><ul><li>Substantial portion of authors (up to 35%) unaware of possibility of providing ...
<ul><li>Author writes paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits paper to journal </li></ul><ul><li>Editor and referees review...
RoMEO <ul><li>Website containing publisher and journal open access policies, coded by colour. </li></ul><ul><li>Green: can...
 
Exercise – Publisher agreements <ul><li>Look at your publisher agreements.  Scan the fine print to see whether you which c...
<ul><li>Blackwells – Yellow </li></ul><ul><li>Mary Ann Liebert – White </li></ul><ul><li>BioMed Central – Green </li></ul>...
Institutional Repositories (IR) <ul><li>&quot;... a university-based institutional repository is a set of services that a ...
OA & IRs <ul><li>Institutional Repository benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates access to research outputs for internal ...
University of Bath IR <ul><li>Bath OPuS (Online Publications Store) </li></ul><ul><li>Currently under development, due for...
Next steps for authors <ul><li>Publishing in OA journals </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiating copyright and IPR with publishers <...
 
Copyrights and Licences <ul><li>Copyrights treated as one bundle by publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Author Copyrights consist...
Intellectual Property Rights <ul><li>Options: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modify your Copyright Transfer Agreement </li></ul></u...
SPARC Author Addendum <ul><li>A BALANCED APPROACH TO COPYRIGHT MANAGEMENT: </li></ul><ul><li>Authors </li></ul><ul><li>Ret...
 
Save your final version <ul><li>Pre-print or post-print version for deposit in the repository </li></ul>
Questions <ul><li>Kara Jones </li></ul><ul><li>Research Publications Librarian </li></ul><ul><li>Ph : 01225 38 4897 </li><...
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Ritss Scholarly Communication Klj0907

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  • Transcript of "Ritss Scholarly Communication Klj0907"

    1. 1. The changing scholarly communication landscape Research and Information Skills Training Library & Learning Centre University of Bath 4 September 2007 Kara Jones/Chris Roberts
    2. 2. Quick check <ul><li>A. I have published articles and/or presented at conferences? </li></ul><ul><li>B. I am in the process of publishing and article or presenting a conference paper? </li></ul><ul><li>C. I have not published at all. </li></ul><ul><li>D. None of the above. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Research output at the University of Bath <ul><li>2005-August 2007: Over 1300 articles published in journals covered by the Web of Science index authored or co-authored by Bath staff. </li></ul><ul><li>40+ articles per month published </li></ul><ul><li>Plus conference papers, working papers, theses, etc… </li></ul>
    4. 4. Overview <ul><li>Aim: To raise awareness of the changing landscape of scholarly communication. </li></ul><ul><li>Audience: Research officers, academic staff, those involved in the publications process. </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly communication </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing Models: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional publishing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alternative publishing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OA journals </li></ul><ul><li>Self-archiving </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Repositories </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright and intellectual property rights </li></ul>
    5. 5. Scholarly communication <ul><li>Describe the steps to publishing an article in a journal. </li></ul><ul><li>What is produced? </li></ul><ul><li>Dissemination? </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholders? </li></ul><ul><li>Who owns what? </li></ul>
    6. 6. Scholarly communication <ul><li>Author writes paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits paper to journal </li></ul><ul><li>Editor and referees review paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author revises paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits final version </li></ul><ul><li>Publisher copy edits and formats paper </li></ul><ul><li>Paper published in journal </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>There’s no scholarship without scholarly communication. (Paul Courant qtd by Clifford Lynch, 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Definition </li></ul><ul><li>System by which academic information is created, reviewed for quality, disseminated to scholarly communities and preserved for future use. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Scholarly Communication <ul><li>Characteristics of “traditional” model: </li></ul><ul><li>Not written for direct compensation </li></ul><ul><li>Content and rights freely given to publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Research and writing usually supported by public funds </li></ul><ul><li>Access intended for as wide an audience as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Peer reviewed, usually for free, by willing editors and peers in similar research field </li></ul>
    9. 9. Traditional Publishing Models <ul><li>Commercial publishers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access via paid subscriptions from library/university </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authors go through peer-review process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asked to sign over copyright to the publisher </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Society publishers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access via paid subscriptions or as part of a membership fee (although cost is generally lower than commercial publishers). </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Why look for alternatives? <ul><li>Libraries want relief from journal prices </li></ul><ul><li>Authors want impact </li></ul><ul><li>Scientists want faster and easier access to others’ research </li></ul><ul><li>Universities want a better return on their investment in intellectual capital </li></ul><ul><li>Restrictive licensing practices impact on authors, readers and institutions </li></ul>
    11. 12. How does the cost of journals impact on Scholarly Communication? <ul><li>Leads to cancellation of journal titles in HE libraries to maintain most frequently used subscriptions </li></ul><ul><li>Limits purchasing of new journal titles </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces the number of scholarly monographs that can be bought for library stock </li></ul><ul><li>Biggest impact in the Science, Technology and Medicine (STM) journals </li></ul>
    12. 13. Licence Restrictions: Authors <ul><li>Publisher contracts can place restrictions on content: </li></ul><ul><li>Who may use the article and for what purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Limits use in teaching (e.g. Study Packs) </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly sharing of article (e.g. email to colleagues, making available on personal website) </li></ul>
    13. 14. Licence Restrictions: Institutions <ul><li>Failure of institutions to get full value from what is paid for: </li></ul><ul><li>Limits on concurrent users </li></ul><ul><li>Costs of purchasing content back from publisher for library collection </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple purchases of the same content as sometimes subscription deals must include print and e-formats </li></ul><ul><li>No guarantee of ‘perpetual access’ to electronic content if subscription is terminated or additional payments needed for permanent access to “backfiles” </li></ul>
    14. 15. Some responses by HE <ul><li>Library consortia negotiations with publishers for better pricing and licensing terms </li></ul><ul><li>National licensing of journals, datasets and e-books in collaboration with deals arranged by (for instance) Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) </li></ul><ul><li>Authors and funding agencies combining with libraries to re-examine the ways scholarly communication takes place – Open Access </li></ul>
    15. 16. Alternative publishing models <ul><li>Open Access (OA) </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarly articles/works are freely accessible to the reader, and do not rely on subscription-based models </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting growth and development of Open Access journals, free for users of the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Self-archiving to make material available via Institutional Repositories </li></ul>
    16. 17. Open Access (OA) Journals <ul><li>Re Open Access: I can see why libraries are behind this but as the open access model is &quot;author pays&quot;, I hope you can see why I am emphatically not! </li></ul><ul><li>(Mathematics professor and member of journal editorial board) </li></ul>
    17. 18. Messages to authors <ul><li>Association of American Publishers (AAP) and members, John Wiley & Sons, Reed Elsevier and the American Chemical Society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>.... &quot;engaged the services of “PR pitbull” Eric Dezenhall ... Nature revealed that Dezenhall had advised the STM publishers to focus on a simple message of “public access equals government censorship”, and to “paint a picture of what the world would look like without peer-reviewed articles”. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>&quot;Leaked plan to attack open access has science in uproar&quot; Information World Review, 5.2.2007 http://www.iwr.co.uk/information-world-review/news/2174291/leaked-plan-attack-open-access </li></ul>
    18. 19. Messages to authors <ul><li>Research funders are requiring that sponsored research be publicly available. </li></ul><ul><li>See the SHERPA JULIET website for details: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/juliet/ </li></ul>
    19. 20. Research Funder Policies
    20. 21. OA journal models <ul><li>Delayed OA (embargoed) </li></ul><ul><li>Hybrid OA ie. Springer Open Choice and Blackwell Online Open </li></ul><ul><li>Partial OA (pay for value-added content such as editorials and review articles) </li></ul><ul><li>Total OA (all articles completely accessible and unrestricted on the internet. Fees paid by author, institution or sponsor) </li></ul><ul><li>See the DOAJ: The Directory of Open Access Journals </li></ul>
    21. 22. Benefits of OA journals? <ul><li>Advances goals of scholarly communication </li></ul><ul><li>Free access for any viewer on the Internet via OA journal titles </li></ul><ul><li>OA titles versus traditional publishers creates increased competition </li></ul><ul><li>Increases pressure for change in publishing sector </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See PRISM </li></ul></ul>
    22. 23. Advantages for authors <ul><li>Wider dissemination and readership than currently permitted in high priced journal titles </li></ul><ul><li>“ toll free” access for readers </li></ul><ul><li>Deposit of academics’ work in institutional repositories (also permissible by agreement with some traditional publishers) </li></ul>
    23. 24. Disadvantages: <ul><li>Author or funding bodies required to pay for publishing </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing in non-traditional journal titles </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult for society publishers who rely on subscription prices to subsidise other activities </li></ul>
    24. 25. Open Access and Self Archiving <ul><ul><li>Substantial portion of authors (up to 35%) unaware of possibility of providing open access by self-archiving (Swan, 2005) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Self-archiving means storing a copy of the content of an article/work in a local archive ie. an institutional repository to permit wider access </li></ul><ul><li>Articles still published in journals, with publisher permission to self-archive pre-prints or post-prints </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-print – a draft of an academic article or other publication before it has been submitted for peer review </li></ul><ul><li>Post-print – the final version of an academic article or other publication, after it has been peer-reviewed and revised into its final form by the author </li></ul>
    25. 26. <ul><li>Author writes paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits paper to journal </li></ul><ul><li>Editor and referees review paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author revises paper </li></ul><ul><li>Author submits final version </li></ul><ul><li>Publisher copy edits and formats paper </li></ul><ul><li>Paper published in journal </li></ul>Author self-archives paper in repository Pre-print Post-print Source: SHERPA http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/documents/RCUK_060629.ppt#328,9,Publication & self-archiving
    26. 27. RoMEO <ul><li>Website containing publisher and journal open access policies, coded by colour. </li></ul><ul><li>Green: can archive pre-print and post-print </li></ul><ul><li>Blue: can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow: can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) </li></ul><ul><li>White: archiving not formally supported </li></ul>
    27. 29. Exercise – Publisher agreements <ul><li>Look at your publisher agreements. Scan the fine print to see whether you which colour category your agreement falls into. </li></ul><ul><li>Can you save a copy of your article in an institutional repository? </li></ul><ul><li>Green: can archive pre-print and post-print </li></ul><ul><li>Blue: can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow: can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) </li></ul><ul><li>White: archiving not formally supported </li></ul>
    28. 30. <ul><li>Blackwells – Yellow </li></ul><ul><li>Mary Ann Liebert – White </li></ul><ul><li>BioMed Central – Green </li></ul><ul><li>AAAS - Blue </li></ul>
    29. 31. Institutional Repositories (IR) <ul><li>&quot;... a university-based institutional repository is a set of services that a university offers to the members of its community for the management and dissemination of digital materials created by the institution and its community members. </li></ul><ul><li>It is most essentially an organizational commitment to the stewardship of these digital materials, including long-term preservation where appropriate, as well as organization and access or distribution&quot;. </li></ul><ul><li>(Lynch, 2003) </li></ul>
    30. 32. OA & IRs <ul><li>Institutional Repository benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitates access to research outputs for internal and external audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Preserves outputs for future reference </li></ul><ul><li>Engages with the open access community for scholarly research </li></ul><ul><li>Puts in place the necessary infrastructure for the likely future requirements of research funders in the context of open access. </li></ul>
    31. 33. University of Bath IR <ul><li>Bath OPuS (Online Publications Store) </li></ul><ul><li>Currently under development, due for release start of semester 2 (Feb 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>We would welcome materials from those willing to deposit during the pilot phase </li></ul><ul><li>What content will be collected: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Journal articles (pre-print and post-print) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conference papers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working papers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Patents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Theses (MPhil & PhD) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Books, sections and chapters. </li></ul></ul>
    32. 34. Next steps for authors <ul><li>Publishing in OA journals </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiating copyright and IPR with publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Saving a final version of your article </li></ul>
    33. 36. Copyrights and Licences <ul><li>Copyrights treated as one bundle by publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Author Copyrights consist of the following: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reproduction rights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Distribution rights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rights to create Translations or Derivative works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rights to Perform or display works publicly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rights to allow others to exercise any of these rights </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Authors can “unbundle” these rights before transferring to publisher. </li></ul>
    34. 37. Intellectual Property Rights <ul><li>Options: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modify your Copyright Transfer Agreement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Add the SPARC Addendum </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.arl.org/sparc/author/addendum.html </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use a separate Licence to Publish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Copyright toolbox </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://copyrighttoolbox.surf.nl/copyrighttoolbox/authors/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creative commons license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://creativecommons.org/ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    35. 38. SPARC Author Addendum <ul><li>A BALANCED APPROACH TO COPYRIGHT MANAGEMENT: </li></ul><ul><li>Authors </li></ul><ul><li>Retain the rights you want </li></ul><ul><li>Use and develop your own work without restriction </li></ul><ul><li>Increase access for education and research </li></ul><ul><li>Receive proper attribution when your work is used </li></ul><ul><li>If you choose, deposit your work in an open online archive where it will be permanently and openly accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain a non-exclusive right to publish and distribute a work and receive a financial return </li></ul><ul><li>Receive proper attribution and citation as journal of first publication </li></ul><ul><li>Migrate the work to future formats and include it in collections </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.arl.org/sparc/author/addendum.html </li></ul>
    36. 40. Save your final version <ul><li>Pre-print or post-print version for deposit in the repository </li></ul>
    37. 41. Questions <ul><li>Kara Jones </li></ul><ul><li>Research Publications Librarian </li></ul><ul><li>Ph : 01225 38 4897 </li></ul><ul><li>Em : K.L.Jones@bath.ac.uk </li></ul>
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