Enterprise Architecture 202: Bridging Strategy & Execution
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Enterprise Architecture 202: Bridging Strategy & Execution

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Enterprises that are more agile and adaptable are more able to succeed in an Information Age world that demands they do more with less, faster, while traditional boundaries blur, and the rules of ...

Enterprises that are more agile and adaptable are more able to succeed in an Information Age world that demands they do more with less, faster, while traditional boundaries blur, and the rules of engagement change. Succeeding in such a world requires that organizations skillfully manage information about their products, customers, suppliers, markets, assets, and liabilities. Fortunately, most enterprises are skilled in such matters. But succeeding in the world of today, and to a even greater extent in the world of tomorrow, also demands that enterprises master the management all of the knowledge about itself, including details about all of its people and processes, intelligence and knowledge, things and places, timings and motivations, plans and measures, rules and jobs, structures and more. We are in the early stages of developing such skills and capabilities. Enterprise Architecture (EA) is the name of this emerging discipline.

EA represents a new way of thinking about and managing the enterprise, including its information technologies. EA is all about achieving the vision of bridging the chasm between strategy and implementation, of capturing all the knowledge about the enterprise and making it available in real time for every imaginable management need, and of having a shared “language” of words, graphics, and other depictions to discuss, document, manage, and make decisions about every important aspect of the enterprise. EA is key to being agile, adaptable, interoperable, integrated, lean, secure, responsive, efficient, effective, and thereby more able to succeed in the Information Age.

The Learning Objectives of Dr. Kappelman’s EA 202 webinar include matters like:
• What is EA and why should you care about it?
• Why and how our mental models and language about enterprises and IT must evolve.
• How to build an EA practice by building on your current capabilities in analysis, design, architecture, governance, planning, and more.
• How EA helps us better manage key trade-offs such as:
• Short-term value versus long-term value.
• Optimizing of parts (e.g., business unit or process) versus optimizing the whole.
• What to expect and assume on your EA journey.

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Enterprise Architecture 202: Bridging Strategy & Execution Enterprise Architecture 202: Bridging Strategy & Execution Document Transcript

  • 10/30/2011 Enterprise Architecture 202:Creating the Information Age Enterprise andBridging the Chasm Between Strategy & Execution 1-November-2011 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EST 1 ITMPI005 Leon A. Kappelman, Ph.D. pp , Professor of Information Systems Director Emeritus, Information Systems Research Center College of Business, University of North Texas Fellow, Texas Center for Digital Knowledge Founding Chair, Society for Information Management EA Working Group kapp@unt.edu Michael Mil i Mi h l Milutis Director of Marketing Computer Aid, Inc. (CAI) Michael_milutis@compaid.com 2 1
  • 10/30/2011About the PresenterLeon A. Kappelman, Ph.D. is a research scientist, teacher, author, speaker, and consultant dedicated to helping organizations better manage their information, systems, systems and technology assets He is Director Emeritus of the IS Research Center assets. and a Professor of Information Systems in the Information Technology & Decision Sciences Department of the College of Business at the University of North Texas, where he is also a Fellow of the Texas Center for Digital Knowledge. Dr. Kappelman is founding chair of the Society for Information Management’s (SIM) Enterprise Architecture Working Group. He has assisted many public and private organizations with technology management activities including strategic planning, governance, software development, project management, enterprise architecture, continuity of operations, and IT workforce management. He has given presentations and written a t c es on these and other articles o t ese a d ot e IT management top cs, a d test ed be o e t e US a age e t topics, and testified before the Congress on technology legislation and IT management practices. Professor Kappelman has published several books, over 100 articles, and has lectured and conducted seminars and workshops on many management, business, and technology topics in North America, Europe, and Asia. His work has been reported in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, BusinessWeek, Newsweek, Washington Post, LA Times, and scores of other newspapers and magazines; he has appeared on CNN, CNBC, PBS, ABC World News Tonight, as well as regional television and 3 radio stations. He brought nearly $2.5 million in research contracts to the university. CAI Achieves IT Operational Excellence 4 2
  • 10/30/2011 PDU CREDITS FOR THIS WEBINAR The Project Management Institute has accredited this webinar with PDUs 5 NOW AVAILABLE!ONLINE WEBINAR RECORDINGS ANYTIME ACCESS!WWW. ITMPI ORGWWW ITMPI.ORG / LIBRARY7 Day Free Access For All Recordings www.twitter.com/ ITMPI 6 3
  • 10/30/2011 Enterprise Architecture 202: Bridging the the Information Age Enterprise Creating Chasm Between Strategy and Execution Leon A. Kappelman, Ph.D. Professor of Information Systems Founding Chair, Society for Information Management EA Working Group Director Emeritus, Information Systems Research Center Fellow, Texas Center for Digital Knowledge Information Technology & Decision Sciences Department College of Business, University of North Texas Website: http://courses.unt.edu/kappelman/ Email: kapp@unt.edu Phone: 940-565-4698 Fax: 940-565-4935EA ITMPI005 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 202: ©Enterprise Architecture:Why Bother?If you can’t “see” it, then ityou can’t effectivelychange it or manage it. Especially if it’s complicated or f big, or will grow, evolve, or change at some point in time.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 4
  • 10/30/2011 The act of discovery consists not in finding new lands but in seeing with new eyes. – Marcel ProustEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Organization, Organization “know thyself”! – Socrates Socrates – ConsultingEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 5
  • 10/30/2011 What is an Organization? Logical PhysicalEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. “The beginning of e beg go wisdom is the definition of terms” – SocratesEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 6
  • 10/30/2011 OntologyThe metaphysical study of the nature ofbeing and existence.Ontology applied toenterprises:• Study of the nature of their existence. y• Answers questions like: • What is an enterprise? • What does it mean to be an enterprise? • What do I need to know about an organization if I want to know it?EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.The practice of EnterpriseArchitecture is the ontological gexamination of a particularenterprise in order to know itsnature, essential properties,and the relationships amongthem.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 7
  • 10/30/2011 Architecture? What’s that?• Architecture is “the set of descriptive representations about an object”. [John Zachman]• Enterprise Architecture is “the holistic set of descriptions about the enterprise over time“. [SIMEAWG] time• Enterprise Architecture is modeling the enterprise.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Stephen Hawking “All we ever know is our models ” models.” "Our models may get closer and closer, but we will never reach direct perception of reality.” • Every model is imperfect. • But models are all we have. • Even language is a model.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 8
  • 10/30/2011In terms of the whole organization…EA is about the creation of a shared language (ofwords, images, and so on) to communicateabout,about think about, and manage the enterprise. about enterpriseIf the people in the enterprise cannot communicate well enough to align their ideas and thoughts about the enterprise (e.g., strategy, goals, objectives, purpose, …),then they cannot align the things they manage (e g (e.g., applications, data, projects, goods and services, jobs, vehicles, people, …).EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. “Architecture is politics.” — Mitchell KaporEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 9
  • 10/30/2011 “Information Age Organization Organization” EA is all about Peter Senge’s “technologies” of a Learning Organization “where people are continually learning to see the whole together”: • Holistic/systems thinking (big picture & connections) • Team learning (collaboration) i ( i ) • Shared mental models (shared language & models) • Building shared vision (shared goals) • Personal mastery (Senge, The Fifth Discipline, 1990)EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Do we really need a “shared language”? 10
  • 10/30/2011No EA = no shared language = you get … • “IT and business alignment remains CIOs top concern.… Some things never change.” (InformationWeek, 3Sept08) • “Yet again, alignment is the top priority for CIOs.” Business Alignment: The Eternal Priority” (CIO Insight, 22Mar07) • “top IT management concerns of CIOs in top 2006 … the alignment of IT and business at their companies …according to …survey by the Society for Information Management. ” (InformationWeek, 18Sep06) EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.“KEY ISSUES FOR IT EXECUTIVES 2005” MISQuarterly Executive, 2006, Luftman, Kempaiah, & Nash. EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 11
  • 10/30/2011 Top IT Management Concerns 1980-2010 1980- IT Management 201 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 199 199 198 198 198 198 Concerns 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 4 0 6 5 3 0Business productivity & cost 1 1 7 4reductionBusiness agility and speed to 2 3 13 17 7 5 7marketIT and business alignment 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 9 7 5 2 7 9IT reliability and efficiency 3 6Business Process Reengineering 3 4 18 15 11 5 10 10 2IT Strategic planning 6 7 3 8 4 4 4 2 10 3 1 1 1 1Revenue generating IT 6 8THIS IS SYMPTOMATIC OF NOT SUFFICIENTLYinnovationsIT cost reduction 8 5 7 4UNDERSTANDING THE “REQUIREMENTS”):Security and privacy 9 10 9 15 8 6 3 2 3 3 19 18 6 14 12Globalization • SPECIFIC DETAILS OF A PARTICULARChange managementOutsourcing/vendor management 11 12 14 11 6 7 3 2 3 3 19 18 6 14 12 OBJECTIVE, ACTIVITY OBJECTIVE ACTIVITY, AND/OR PROCESS.Enterprise architecture PROCESS13 13 11 17 11 33 15 15 9 8 4 1 8IT human resource considerations • OVERALL CONTEXT – THE BIG PICTURE OFKnowledge managementProject management 13 13 17 11 10 23 5 10 HOW IT ALL FITS TOGETHER.Sourcing decisions 13 17 10 16 10CIO leadership role • OR BOTHIT organization designSocietal implications of IT 15 20 EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Moreover, EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 12
  • 10/30/2011 • “Alignment,” “flexibility,” “nimbleness,” “simplicity,” “agility,” and so on are design objectives or goals. They answers questions like “what do we want it to look like?” • The answer to the question “how do we accomplish it?” – Most call “planning” or “strategic planning” and “execution” or “implementation”; – A few, but only those thinking in a very comprehensive and holistic sense of the term, call it “enterprise architecture.” – It will be called ……?...... in 20 years.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. How does a EA ow an shared language help IT perform better?EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 13
  • 10/30/2011EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 14
  • 10/30/2011EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Artwork by Russell Douglas in The SIM Guide to Enterprise Architecture: Creating the Information Enterprise Architecture As Press, Taylor and Francis Group, NYC, (www.crcpress.com). Age Enterprise, 2010, CRC Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution, Jeanne Ross, Peter Weill, & David Robertson, Harvard Business Press, 2006.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 15
  • 10/30/2011 Artwork by Russell Douglas in The SIM Guide to Enterprise Architecture: Creating the Information Enterprise Architecture As Press, Taylor and Francis Group, NYC, (www.crcpress.com). Age Enterprise, 2010, CRC Strategy: Creating a Foundation for Business Execution, Jeanne Ross, Peter Weill, & David Robertson, Harvard Business Press, 2006.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. “We shape our buildings — t e ea te t ey s ape us. thereafter they shape us.” — Sir Winston Churchill “We shape our enterprises and their systems — thereafter they shape us ” us. — Leon KappelmanEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 16
  • 10/30/2011 System Requirements? We know how to do t at o t e that! Don’t we?EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. INDUSTRY DATA ON DEFECT ORIGINS Because defect removal is such a major cost element, studying defect origins is a valuable undertaking. IBM Corporation ( p (MVS) ) SPR Corporation ( p (client studies) ) 45% Design errors 20% Requirements errors 25% Coding errors 30% Design errors 20% Bad fixes 35% Coding errors 5% Documentation errors 10% Bad fixes 5% Administrative errors 5% Documentation errors 100% 100% TRW Corporation Mitre Corporation Nippon Electric Corp. 60% Design errors 64% Design errors 60% Design errors 40% Coding errors 36% Coding errors 40% Coding errors 100% 100% 100% Copyright © 2009 by Capers Jones. All Rights Reserved. SWQUAL0834EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 17
  • 10/30/2011Brooks on the difficulties of softwaredevelopment … “The hardest single part of building awhat rate of progress “To see software system is one can expect in software deciding precisely what to technology, let us examine the gy build. build No other part of the difficulties of that technology. conceptual work is as difficult Following Aristotle, I divide asthem into essence, the establishing the detailed technical requirements…. No difficulties inherent in the other part of the work so nature of software, and cripples the system if done accidents, those difficulties wrong. No attend its wrongtoday other part is more that difficult to rectifyare not production but later.” inherent.” "No Silver Bullet - Essence & Accidents of Software Engineering” 1986 in Information Processing 86. H.J. Kugler, ed., Elsevier, 1069-1076. (Invited paper, IFIP Congress 86, Dublin) Reprinted in The Mythical Man-Month, 20th Anniversary Edition, Frederick P. Brooks, Jr., Addison-Wesley, 1995.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.U.S. AVERAGES FORSOFTWARE QUALITY (Data expressed in terms of defects per function point) Defect Removal Delivered Defect Origins Potential Efficiency Defects Requirements 45% 1.00 77% 0.23 56% Design 1.25 85% 0.19 Coding 1.75 95% 0.09 Documents 0.60 80% 0.12 Bad Fixes 0.40 70% 0.12 TOTAL 5.00 85% 0.75 (All defect sources - not just coding defects) Copyright © 2009 by Capers Jones. All Rights Reserved. SWQUAL0836EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 18
  • 10/30/2011 BEST IN CLASS SOFTWARE QUALITY (Data expressed in terms of defects per function point) Defect Removal Delivered Defect Origins Potential Efficiency Defects Requirements 40% 0.40 85% 0.08 77% Design 0.60 97% 0.02 Coding 1.00 99% 0.01 Documents 0.40 98% 0.01 Bad Fixes 0.10 95% 0.01 TOTAL 2.50 96% 0.13 50% of 17% of US avg. US avg. OBSERVATION: Most often found in systems software > SEI CMM Level 3 Copyright © 2009 by Capers Jones. All Rights Reserved. SWQUAL0837EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. SIMEAWG IT Management Practices Study Averages (Scale: 1[=awful] to 5 [=superior])• 3.67 Overall average (64 questions)• 3.92 Purpose / function of EA (7 questions)• 3.90 Potential benefits of EA (20 questions)• 3.68 ISD CMM practices and capabilities (12 questions)• 3.53 Use of requirements artifacts (10 q q ( questions) )• 3.33 Requirements practices & capabilities (15 questions) The SIM Guide to Enterprise Architecture: Creating the Information Age Enterprise, 2010, edited by Leon A. Kappelman, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, NYC, (www.crcpress.com).EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 19
  • 10/30/2011 What is an Enterprise? Logical PhysicalEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. LOGICAL PHYSICALEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 20
  • 10/30/2011EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Strategist’s Vision Business Model Logical Model Physical Model Subcontractor’s View Functioning Enterprise 21
  • 10/30/2011 RESOURCES BEHAVIORSEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. W H W W W W H O H H H H A W E O E Y T ? R ? N ? ? E ? ? 22
  • 10/30/2011 EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. | Behaviors Things | | |Logical | |___________________________________________ | |Physical | | | | | EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 23
  • 10/30/2011EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Architecture/Requirements A hit t /R i t (Strategy, Design, & Plans) Project Management (Execution & Implementation) Instantiation / Operations (Functioning Enterprise)EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 24
  • 10/30/2011 Strategy Execution E tiEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Zachman’s Framework for EA …… is an ontology, a data model (schema) for allthe knowledge about the enterprise.… is process and method agnostic. It doesn’tcare how you get the knowledge.… posits that if you want to be aligned, agile,optimized, or whatever your enterprise designobjectives, then these are the data you musthave and use in order to effectively: • achieve those objectives; • manage change and complexity; • manage the enterprise & all its resources including its technologies.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 25
  • 10/30/2011EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. http://zachman.com By whatever means you get them, these are the data you must have and use …EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. http://zachman.com 26
  • 10/30/2011 By whatever means you get them, these are the data you must have and use … “Someday you’re going to really wish you had all those models; so you might as well get started now.”– John ZachmanEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. http://zachman.comWhat is EA?• EA is a different way of seeing, communicating about, & managing the enterprise & all of its assets, including IT.• EA gets to essence of IT success: Knowing & communicating the organization’s requirements.• EA is key to: – achieving & keeping business-IT alignment & other objectives. – helping the organization create value.• EA includes many things you are already do; such as requirements analysis, system design, strategic planning, network design, standard setting, knowledge management, data warehousing, SOA, BPR, etc., etc., … – BUT EA is much, much more than that. – Still, you can build your EA practice on what you are already doingEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 27
  • 10/30/2011 Some graphical concepts for communicating with Zachman’s Enterprise Ontology • Scope about something is depicted by width in a cell. – A “sliver” is indicative of narrow or limited scope – as in a stovepipe or a particular application. – Example: Run • Level of detail about something is depicted by depth in a cell. cell – It depicts how much you know about it – What you don’t know you must assume. ntation12-2EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 28
  • 10/30/2011 Enterprise Architecture for Integration: Rapid Delivery Methods and Technologies, Clive Finkelstein, (2nd Edition, June 2011).EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 29
  • 10/30/2011Perfect WorldEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.More often than we’d like to admit practice: IT System AcquisitionEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 30
  • 10/30/2011Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition 31
  • 10/30/2011Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition Assessment: Strategic Alignment EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 32
  • 10/30/2011Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition Audit of Controls & Compliance EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition Audit of Controls & Compliance EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 33
  • 10/30/2011Typical Practice: IT System Acquisition Audit of Controls & Compliance What is EA?• EA is a different way of seeing, communicating about, & managing the enterprise & all of its assets, including IT.• EA gets to essence of IT success: Knowing & communicating the organization’s requirements. organization s• EA is key to: – achieving & keeping business-IT alignment & other objectives. – helping the organization create value.• EA includes many things you are already do; such as requirements analysis, system design, strategic planning, network design, standard setting, knowledge management, data warehousing, SOA, BPR, etc., etc., … – BUT EA is much, much more than that. – Still, you can build your EA practice on what you are already doing EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 34
  • 10/30/2011 So how do you build an EA practice on what you are already doing?EA ITMPI005 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 202: © Software Architecture Systems Analysis Systems Design So t a e o t o o Software PortfolioEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 35
  • 10/30/2011 Strategic Planning Business Modeling Business Architecture us ess c tectu eEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Disaster Recovery Continuity of Operations (COOP) Continuity of Government (COG)EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 36
  • 10/30/2011 Human Resources Organization Design g g Job DesignEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Business Process Reengineering Process ImprovementEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 37
  • 10/30/2011 Network Net ork Design Network ArchitectureEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. Data Design Data Architecture Data WarehousingEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 38
  • 10/30/2011 Rules Management Business Rules Expert SystemsEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. “Someday you’re going to really wish you had all those models. – John Zachman http://zachman.comEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 39
  • 10/30/2011Road to the Future: Institutionalizing EA• This is a new way of life: There is no quick fix; no silver bullet. EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 40
  • 10/30/2011Example of an EA governance integratedinto all governance structures … VA Executive Board Organizational Change Management Strategic Management Council Office of Cyber Security Capital Information Technology Board Investment I t t Council Project Management Office EA Architecture CouncilEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. “Integrated Business Technology Landscape” Armstrong Process Group, Inc. http://www.aprocessgroup.com/offerings/index.aspEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 41
  • 10/30/2011Road to the Future: Institutionalizing EA• This is a new way of life: There is no quick fix; no silver bullet.• This will take time and determination, as well as vision, courage and commitment: Do not underestimate the difficulty and complexity of architecting and engineering one of humankind s humankind’s most complex objects – the Enterprise Enterprise.• Do not get discouraged: This is a revolution in thinking, a discipline, an engineering process. Change of this magnitude takes time and perseverance.• Set realistic expectations: Things have to be implemented and modified periodically so you have to accept some risk of “scrap and rework." Progress trumps perfection.• Dont assume anything: Make executive education and Don t technical training a continuous process. It is easy to forget long-term issues in the short-term stress of daily life.• Learn!: The state of the art is only about 25 years old and the "playing field" still pretty level – there is still much to learn & discover, & many opportunities to create advantage & value. EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 42
  • 10/30/2011 You will also need some EA processes and governance bodies that integrate EA into the processes and governance activities for everything else (IT and business).Example of an EA developmentprocess: TOGAF ArchitectureDevelopment Method (ADM) cycle http://pubs.opengroup.org/architecture/togaf8-doc/arch/chap03.html EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.Implementation Guidelines: Getting Started • Build on what you’re already doing (including projects). • Use collaborative approaches to doing & governing EA: – Organize an EA working group or EA council. – Learn together & work toward agreement about language, models, methods • Get participation & commitment from IT & business p p management: – At all levels (but start as high as possible). Leadership counts! • Determine the goals, focus, scope, and priorities: – Aim for completeness & comprehensiveness. Deal with day-to-day needs. • Embrace continuous change, learning, & communication: – Remember, it’s a journey and a process. – Evangelize. Have an “elevator speech”. Get your “converters” one at a time. • Start small and show early success. Then build on it. y – Identify EA initiatives of most value to organization. – Help the value creators, it creates champions and wins hearts and minds. • Monitor, evaluate, and improve on a continuous basis: – Quantify the benefits – Regularly take a hard look at EA cost-value proposition, and make it better. • Use EA in IT for CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT and to COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR CUSTOMERS & STAKEHOLDERS EA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 43
  • 10/30/2011 “No one has to change. Survival is optional.” – Dr. W. Edwards DemingEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved.SIM Guide to Enterprise Architecture A project of the Society for Information Management’s EA Working Group (SIMEAWG). Free shipping & 40% discount with code “542KA” for purchase at http://www.crcpress.com. All author royalties go to further the work of the not- for-profit SIMEAWG. Edited by: Leon A. Kappelman, Ph.D. Foreword by: Jeanne W. Ross, Ph.D. Contributing Authors, Panelists, & Artists (alphabetically): 40% discount • Bruce V. Ballengee • George S. Paras • Larry B rgess Larr Burgess • Alex Ale Pettit code = 542KA d • Ed Cannon • Jeanne W. Ross at • Larry R. DeBoever • Brian Salmans • Russell Douglas • Anna Sidorova CRCPress.com • Randolph C. Hite • Gary F. Simons • Leon A. Kappelman • Kathie Sowell • Mark Lane • Tim Westbrock • Thomas McGinnis • John A. ZachmanEA 202: © 2000-2011 Leon A. Kappelman. All rights reserved. 44
  • 10/30/2011 Questions? 89CAI SponsorsThe IT Metrics & Productivity Institute: • Clearinghouse Repository of Best Practices: WWW.ITMPI.ORG • Weekly Educational Newsletter: WWW.ITMPI.ORG / SUBSCRIBE • Weekly Webinars Hosted by Industry Leaders: WWW.ITMPI.ORG / WEBINARS • ACCESS WEBINAR RECORDINGS ANYTIME AT WWW.ITMPI.ORG / LIBRARY • Follow Us on TWITTER at WWW.TWITTER.COM / ITMPI • Join Our Network on LINKED IN at WWW.ITMPI.ORG/ LINKEDIN • Follow Us on FACEBOOK at WWW.ITMPI.ORG/ FACEBOOK • Find Out About Our CONFERENCES at WWW.ITMPI.ORG/ EVENTS 90 45
  • 10/30/2011 Leon A. Kappelman, Ph.D. pp , Professor of Information Systems Director Emeritus, Information Systems Research Center College of Business, University of North Texas Fellow, Texas Center for Digital KnowledgeFounding Chair, Society for Information Management EA Working Group kapp@unt.edu Michael Milutis Director of Marketing Computer Aid, Inc. (CAI) Michael_milutis@compaid.com 91 46