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Office ergonomics by kapil
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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO OFFICE ERGONOMICS Presented To: Dr. A. Bharadwaj Mech. Engg. Dept. MNIT Jaipur Presented By: Kapil Jain Gaurav Kumar Ayush Mathur 1
  • 2. Review your Work Area •We spend most of our day in our work area. •We don’t want our work area to contribute to ergonomic problems •Ergonomic Rule #1 Work Comfortably! If most of our work is done in an office continue If most of our work is done outside of an office continue 2
  • 3. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place Use a good CHAIR Backrest is provides good lower back support Arms adjustable Front edge of seat pan curves down Height adjustable Seat pan adjustable horizontally and tilts On rollers Five feet for base-most stable 3
  • 4. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place MONITOR HEIGHT  The position of our head and neck is very important  Place computer monitors directly in front of us.  The right height is person dependent- usually the top of the screen at eye level (or slightly below for those who wear bifocals)  Raise the monitor if we have to look down at it The screen should be at least an arms length away (If we can’t see at that distance, get special computer glasses) 4
  • 5. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place KEYBOARD STYLES A variety of styles are available. Choose one that is comfortable for us. 5
  • 6. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place KEYBOARD HOLDER Keyboard holders should Tilt  Provide wrist rests (rest palms not wrist)   Provide space for a mouse 6
  • 7. Keyboard Trays  Keyboard tray with adjustability (swivels left and right, tilts forward and back, allows for mouse, extends to different heights and positions)  Position so wrists are in neutral posture 7
  • 8. Neutral Postures Include Wrist posture Wrists straight, not bent or twisted 8
  • 9. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place MOUSE HOLDERS Mouse trays or mouse holders can bring a mouse to a better position 9
  • 10. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place MOUSE STYLES Choose a style comfortable for our hand and fingers 10
  • 11. Workplace Ergonomics 11
  • 12. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place WORK PLACEMENT  Position equipment so that our body is in a comfortable and natural position most of the time while we are working.  Don’t place things so we have to reach, twist or bend continually  Place work at monitor height or place in path of monitor  Listen to our body. If we cannot focus or often feel tired or uncomfortable, We are probably not working in a good position.  See what we can do to make our work more comfortable for us. Disclaimer: Wait a minute! Though this position may look comfortable, it is NOT a comfortable position to work in. Imagine how our back would feel after typing a few pages in this position! Do not equate comfortable leisure positions with comfortable work positions! 12
  • 13. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place Everyone needs a relaxed, neutral position DO WHAT’S COMFORTABLE FOR OUR BODY! Wrists straight Forearms and thighs parallel to the floor 13
  • 14. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place MOUSE POSITION  Mouse should be close to the keyboard and the same height or slightly higher NO! 14
  • 15. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place Phone PLACEMENT Should be different for right and left hander We should not have to twist and reach across our body every time we answer the phone. Many people need to spend a lot of time on the phone, and must often do other tasks at the same time This creates a lot of stress for neck and shoulder muscles Consider a head set if we spend a lot of time on the phone, especially if we do other tasks at the same time 15
  • 16. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place Document PLACEMENT Place documents so that we don’t need to bend our head to read while on keyboard Consider getting a document holder 16
  • 17. Ergonomic STRESSORS Environmental conditions Environmental conditions can influence ergonomic stress.  Lighting  Noise  Temperature ….even at a computer station! 17
  • 18. Ergonomic STRESSORS LIGHTING & MONITOR GLARE  Lighting should be indirect and adequate  Not too much light, or it may cause a glare, headaches and eye fatigue  If there is a glare on our eyes as we work, use anti-glare screens on computers, or adjustable blinds at windows Ideal is 35-50 foot candles 18
  • 19. Office Ergonomics- The right equipment, the right place GLARE SCREENS 19
  • 20. Have to Consider the Whole Working Space 20
  • 21. COMPUTER VISION SYNDROME can be prevented Accommodate our eyes   Use computer eyewear when appropriate Placement of reference material and monitor distance should be comfortable for our eyes Prevent constant glare   Keep monitor clean Use:    indirect lighting non-reflective walls and furniture anti-glare screens Exercise our eyes   Periodically focus on object 20 feet away Blink eyes rapidly if they feel dry 21
  • 22. Ergonomic STRESSORS Noise can be a STRESSOR  If our office is near a noise source, close our door, or wear ear plugs  Besides causing ear damage, constant noise can create extra muscle tension in the body causing fatigue and making it easier for ergonomic injuries to occur. 22
  • 23. Ergonomic STRESSORS Temperature  People are more prone to ergonomic injuries in cold environments. Muscles and other tissues are more tense, because of decreased circulation.  Dress appropriately  Do some warm up exercises, such as stretching our hands, to loosen our finger muscles before keyboarding. 23
  • 24. Ergonomic STRESSORS FORCE can be a stressor A task can require a moderate amount of force to be applied to very small muscles  Examples: Dragging and dropping with the mouse  Gripping the sides of the mouse or phone tightly  Pounding on the keyboard  Grasping thick file folders  Stapling or stamping  Opening 3-ring binder  Lifting heavy manuals with one hand  24
  • 25. Ergonomic STRESSORS MECHANICAL CONTACT STRESS A hard or sharp surface or object pressing into the soft tissues, the tendons, nerves and blood vessels.  Examples: Resting wrists on the desk edge while typing or using mouse  Leaning elbows on hard chair or armrests or work surfaces  Sitting in chair that places pressure on the backs of the thighs  25
  • 26. Ergonomic STRESSORS Noise can be a STRESSOR  If we work near a constant noise source, such as generators or fans, close your door, or wear ear plugs.  Besides causing ear damage, constant noise can create extra muscle tension in the body causing fatigue and making it easier for ergonomic injuries to occur. 26
  • 27. Ergonomic STRESSORS Noise can be a STRESSOR  If we use equipment which makes loud noise, wear ear plugs. EH&S can help us find some which are comfortable and appropriate  Use of most power equipment, machinery, lawn mowers, and blowers should require ear plugs. x 27
  • 28. Solutions Individual work routine and habit Fortunately, most STRESSORS can be minimized or eliminated by individual habits and work routine. The solution to most ergonomic problems is to work comfortably and avoid a few common ergonomic pitfalls. 28
  • 29. Solutions Avoid REPETITION Performing the same or similar motions repeatedly for extended periods without time for rest and recovery can lead to discomfort or trauma. Examples:        Keyboarding, mousing, and 10-keying Flipping through files & paperwork Extended reading or writing Punching or stapling Pruning or clipping Painting Hammering 29
  • 30. Solutions AVOID LONG DURATION OF SAME TASK  The length of time spent at a task without breaks, shifts in position, or stretches is more important than the actual task.  The longer the uninterrupted duration of a task, the more potential for discomfort or injury Our bodies are designed to do work. But the result on the body of doing a repetitive task for 2 hours verses 6 hours straight is very different. 30
  • 31. Solutions STRETCHES & BREAKS  Static positions are our enemy!  Whenever we think of it, change position  Small frequent stretches go a long way in preventing MSD’s. 31
  • 32. Solutions Avoid BAD POSTURES Everyone has seen these…. Slouching over a computer Propping a phone on shoulder Bad postures are a primary cause of ergonomic injuries 32
  • 33. Solutions Avoid AWKARD POSITIONS Awkward positions bend the joints in a way that they are more likely to become injured. Examples:         Reaching up and over Slouching or leaning forward in the chair Leaning forward or bending over work Holding heavy items in position Lifting, pushing pulling Turning head side to side to view the monitor Cradling the phone between the ear and shoulder Typing with bent wrists AW PO KW SIT AR IO D NS cre ate ST RE SS 33
  • 34. Evaluate this office 34
  • 35. High risk for wrist  Monitor Too close  Height is good   Keyboard On table top (too high)  Wrist are extended   Other  Cat? 35
  • 36. Evaluate this office 36
  • 37. HELP!!!  Monitor  Not bad  Keyboard and mouse Way low  Arm is extended out  Worker slouched   Risk for wrist, arm, neck and back 37
  • 38. References    ERGONOMICS HAND BOOK, Fifth Edition, Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers Inc. Office Ergonomics-Karl H.E. Kroemer Research Paper-Health and Performance Consequences of Office Ergonomic Interventions Among Computer Workers-Michelle M. Robertson OFFICE 38
  • 39. Suggestion & Comments… 39

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