Uploaded on

 

More in: Spiritual , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
701
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Youth  Radio    Founded  in  1992,  Youth  Radios  mission  is  to  promote  young  peoples  intellectual,  creative,  and  professional  growth  through  training  and  access  to  media  and  to  produce  the  highest  quality  original  media  for  local  and  national  outlets.    At  the  heart  of  Youth  Radio’s  pioneering  effort  is  a  youth  development  practice  that  combines  training  in  journalism  and  media  production  with  health  and  academic  support  services.    In  2007,  Youth  Radio  moved  from  its  storefront  location  in  Berkeley  to  a  forefront  Media  &  Technology  Center  located  in  downtown  Oakland.    The  move  enabled  Youth  Radio  to  increase  the  number  of  young  people  it  serves,  and  design  a  center  specifically  focused  on  training  participants  utilizing  cutting-­‐edge  technology.  Currently  Youth  Radio  houses  3  media  training  classes  for  14-­‐18  year  old  high  school  students.    Participants  who  complete  6-­‐months  of  Youth  Radio  training  are  eligible  for  paid  on-­‐site  internships  while  in  high  school,  and  part-­‐time  associate  level  positions  until  the  age  of  24.    In  recent  years,  this  workforce  component  of  our  programming  has  increased  to  meet  the  needs  of  our  participants  and  the  demands  of  the  new  media  landscape.        Youth  Radio  produced  this  short  video  highlighting  our  tech  and  media  work.      However,  in  the  nearly  20  years  that  Youth  Radio  has  been  doing  youth  media  work,  we’ve  come  to  realize  that  technology  education  and  employment  training  are  ultimately  most  effective  when  coupled  with  wraparound  support  services.    Thus,  Youth  Radio  shifted  from  our  original  pure  media  education  focus  to  a  more  holistic  education  meets  wellness  model.    Academic  and  career  advising,  mental  health  services  and  individual  case  management  are  now  integral  elements  of  our  youth  work.      The  most  recent  step  in  our  institutional  evolution  is  the  addition  of  youth-­‐led  public  health  advocacy  programming.    Using  new  social  media  platforms  as  well  as  in-­‐person  outreach  and  workshop  training,  Youth  Radio  interns  engage  and  educate  their  communities  on  a  variety  of  public  health  issues.    These  issues  include  teen  dating  violence,  safer  sex  and  STI  prevention,  food  access  and  equity,  and  the  commercial  sexual  exploitation  of  minors.            But  let’s  pull  back  from  the  bigger  picture  and  get  into  what  the  work  looks  like  on  the  ground  across  the  various  programs.  We’ve  invited  all  of  the  staff  and  youth  team  members  who  will  be  attending  the  ECE  conference  to  share  a  little  bit  about  themselves  and  their  work.  And  of  course,  since  we  are  all  “non-­‐profitty,”  there  are  Icebreaker  questions!              
  • 2. Meet  the  Team    Erik  Director  of  Administration      My  name  is  Erik  Sakamoto  and  I  am  a  fourth  generation  Japanese-­‐American  with  family  roots  in  Honolulu,  Hawaii  (mother)  and  Oakland,  California  (father).    I  grew  up  in  a  few  parts  of  the  Bay  Area,  and  attended  high  school  in  San  Mateo  (an  area  about  20  minutes  south  of  San  Francisco).    After  college  in  Southern  California,  I  moved  to  my  grandmother’s  home  in  Oakland  (a  sort  of  tradition  for  males  on  my  pops  side),  and  have  lived  in  the  city  ever  since.    It’s  where  I’ve  decided  to  commit  myself:  as  a  community  member,  a  husband,  a  father,  and  a  youth  worker.    I  came  to  Youth  Radio  in  2006  having  done  a  fair  share  of  work  in  the  world  of  community  based  non-­‐profits  and  education  in  Oakland.    I  was  originally  hired  to  coordinate  a  new  class  that  focused  on  Oakland’s  young  people  (while  Youth  Radio  was  still  based  out  of  Berkeley)  who  were  deemed  ‘hardest  to  serve’  due  to  their  lack  of  engagement  with  school  and  their  history  of  contact  with  the  justice  system.    At  the  time,  the  position  seemed  designed  for  my  interest  and  experience  in  Oakland  youth  work,  media  literacy  and  technical  skill  training,  and  prevention/intervention.    As  an  aside,  it  is  a  source  of  some  measure  of  pride  that  two  of  my  ECE  teammates  carry  on  the  work  (having  enhanced  it  tremendously)  of  this  program.    Eventually,  I  came  to  lead  Youth  Radio’s  Youth  Development  and  Training  programs,  and  recently  moved  into  a  primarily  administrative  role  dealing  with  organizational  operations.        I  am  grateful  for  the  chance  to  have  made  a  career  of  working  alongside  young  people.    My  work  is  rooted  heavily  in  the  idea  that  in  order  to  address  the  challenges  of  our  world,  young  people  require  access  to  resources  and  opportunity.    These  have  not  been  equitably  distributed  when  it  comes  to  low  income  communities  of  color.    The  result  has  been  a  growing  condemnation  of  those  least  equipped  and  most  affected.    Throughout  my  work  life,  I  have  attempted  to  change  this  pattern.    I  appreciate  the  fact  that  I  have  been  able  to  work  with  some  great  thinkers  at  organizations  dedicated  towards  serving  
  • 3. young  people.    Currently,  I  feel  very  fortunate  to  work  in  a  facility  that  was  built  for  youth  and  their  path  of  self-­‐improvement.    Ice  Breakage:   1. What  is  a  natural  talent  that  you  might  not  have,  but  you  would  like  to  be  gifted   with?   The  ability  to  play  an  instrument.     2. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  love?   Hearing  my  daughter  laugh  out  of  pure  joy  is  pretty  good  right  now.     3. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  hate?   Blatantly  insincere  conversation  (not  even  the  actual  words,  just  the  tone  of   them).     4. What  profession  other  than  your  own  would  you  like  to  attempt?   Working  with  my  hands  as  some  sort  of  craftsman,  provided  I  had  any  talent  in   that  area.     5. If  you  could  have  a  meal  and  a  conversation  with  anyone,  throughout  history-­‐   who  would  it  be  and  what  would  you  eat?   Either  of  my  grandfathers  (I  wouldn’t  be  able  to  choose  between  them)     as  both  of  them  passed  before  I  was  born.    I  think  a  nice  meal  of  sashimi  and  rice,   some  miso  soup,  and  an  Ebisu  or  some  unfiltered  sake  would  be  appropriate.      
  • 4.  D’Mariey  MATCH  (Media  Advocates  Transforming  Community  Health)  Project  Associate      My  name  is  D’mariey  Johnson  I  am  19  years  old  and  I  currently  live  in  Oakland  CA.    I  joined  Youth  Radio  when  I  was  a  freshman  in  high  school  and  I  am  currently  in  college  in  my  sophomore  year.      I  consider  myself  highly  self  motivated,  responsible,  respectful,  a  leader,  open  minded  and  very  considerate.    I  demonstrate  these  skills  through  my  independent  work  that  I  complete  at  Youth  Radio.    A  lot  goes  on  in  my  community  and  it’s  easy  to  get  distracted,  but  yet  I  maintain  to  stay  on  the  right  track  and  do  right.    When  I  first  came  to  Youth  Radio  I  didn’t  really  expect  to  learn  half  the  skills  and  knowledge  I  picked  up.    I  just  saw  Youth  Radio  as  another  youth  center  that  would  use  up  all  my  free  time.  I  soon  noticed  that  was  all  wrong.    My  first  day  of  training  felt  “at  home”,  what  I  mean  by  this  is  I  was  really  comfortable  with  the  environment.    Everyone  was  respectful  and  polite.      I  graduated  from  Youth  Radio’s  beginning  training  program  in  2006.    I  then  went  on  to  become  a  teacher  as  an  intern  in  our  outreach  department.    Working  in  the  outreach  department  was  a  pleasure  and  taught  me  a  lot.    In  outreach  we  would  go  to  different  sites  and  recruit  youth  for  our  program.    We  facilitated  beneficial  workshops  throughout  our  community  that  focus  on  daily  issues  in  our  community,  like  violence,  and  police  brutality  and  disproportionate  incarceration.    Currently,  I  am  a  Project  Associate  at  Youth  Radio  and  my  role  consists  of  teaching  Media  Literacy,  Radio  Broadcasting,  Graphic  Design  and  music  production  to  youth  recently  released  from  incarceration  and/or  on  probation.    That  means  the  students  in  the  program  get  to  try  a  little  bit  of  everything-­‐  software  and  computer  skills,  class  discussion  and  reflection,  research,  writing,  and  on-­‐air  hosting.    When  I  first  started  teaching  I  was  nervous  and  really  didn’t  know  what  kind  of  reaction  to  expect  from  my  peers.    After  teaching  for  a  week  I  soon  became  very  comfortable  
  • 5. and  confident,  even  though  it’s  still  hard  sometimes  to  get  students  to  see  me  as  a  class  leader  when  we  are  all  around  the  same  age.    But  my  co-­‐workers  and  supervisors  always  give  me  advice  and  constructive  feedback.    This  session,  the  MATCH  project  associates  facilitated  a  media  literacy  workshop  about  music  as  a  teaching  tool.    We  showed  the  students  a  couple  videos  and  led  conversations  about  the  lyrics  and  what  type  of  messages  they  contain.  Since  commercial  sexual  exploitation  of  young  people  is  a  big  problem  here  in  Oakland,  one  of  the  videos  we  chose  to  discuss  was  from  Wale  addressing  this  issue.    This  video  helped  start  a  conversation  about  pimp  culture  in  music,  but  most  important  it  also  led  to  a  class  discussion  about  empathy,  and  how  we  need  to  learn  about  the  factors  which  contribute  to  situations  like  this,  instead  of  judging  people.    One  of  the  most  important  things  that  keep  me  coming  to  Youth  Radio  is  my  peers  and  co-­‐workers.    There  is  a  lot  of  love  and  care.    I’ve  never  been  a  part  of  an  atmosphere  where  so  many  people  care  about  your  direction  in  life.    I  decided  to  be  in  this  field  of  work  because  I  feel  that  we  need  change  in  my  community  so  why  not  be  a  part  of  the  change.    Ice-­‐breakage:   1. What  is  your  favorite  word?     My  favorite  word  is  “Na.”     2. What  is  your  least  favorite  word?     My  least  favorite  word  is  “Cat.”     3. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  love?     I  love  the  sound  of  waterfalls.               4. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  hate?     I  hate  hearing  little  dogs  bark.     5.     Who  is  your  favorite  fictional  character?     My  favorite  fictional  character  is  “Hey  Arnold.”     6.     What  profession  other  than  your  own  would  you  like  to  attempt?     I  wouldn’t  mind  to  attempt  to  be  a  professional  motorcycle  rider.         7.     If  you  could  visit  anywhere  in  the  world,  where  would  you  like  to  go?     I  would  want  to  visit  Australia  because  I  love  animals  and  they  have  many  exotic   animals.      
  • 6. Ti’Ara  Mobile  Action  Lab  Project  Associate    Hello  my  name  is  Ti’Ara  Williams;  I  currently  live  in  Richmond,  CA  and  I’m  a  student  at  San  Francisco  State  University.    I  am  19  years-­‐old  and  I  been  a  part  of  Youth  Radio  for  4  years  now.    I  consider  myself  open-­‐minded,  respectful,  leader,  great  worker,  self-­‐motivated,  and  most  importantly,  determined.When  I  entered  Youth  Radio,  I  had  to  face  all  of  my  fears;  interviewing  people,  meeting  people,  presenting,  but  most  importantly  finding  out  who  I  am  as  a  person.    But  this  work  finally  helped  me  find  my  passion!    After  completing  the  introductory  trainings,  I  went  to  the  Health  Department.    I  realized  it  was  something  I  wanted  to  do  long  term  because  it  felt  like  a  family  working  together  and  putting  their  ideas  together  to  make  their  visions  for  the  community  come  true.    The  internship  consisted  of  working  with  my  peers  to  create  a  Teen  Dating  Violence  Primary  Prevention  Campaign.    This  campaign  focused  on  preventing  unhealthy/domestic  violence  relationships  before  they  occur.    Today  in  society,  you  see  unhealthy  relationships  in  your  community,  in  the  media,  everywhere,  but  what  we  don’t  see  is  society  focusing  on  healthy  relationships  and  how  to  build  them.    I  think  it  was  a  good  idea  for  this  campaign  to  be  created  because  in  my  community  and  also  in  other  communities  you  see  lots  of  domestic  violence.    There  are  several  of  my  friends  and  family  members  that  experience  domestic  violence  and  I  didn’t  know  how  to  help  them  through  the  situation  before.But  health  training  is  not  only  about  helping  people  on  an  individual  basis,  it’s  also  about  changing  the  way  we  as  a  whole  think  about  intimate  partner  violence.    One  of  the  ways  we  try  to  spread  this  message  is  through  our  anti-­‐teen  dating  violence  website,  www.bom411.com.    BOM  stands  for  Boss  Of  Me,  because  it’s  about  learning  accountability  for  your  own  actions  as  well  as  not  trying  to  control  your  partner  or  anyone  else  but  yourself.    My  daily  responsibilities  in  the  Health  Department  and  BOM  were  to  write  blogs  for  the  website,  and  create  and  answer  MyDrama,  which  are  like  dating  advice  questions  about  boundaries,  risks,  and  healthy  communication.    We  also  write  and  act  in  short  videos  to  get  youth  started  talking  about  common  relationship  challenges  and  how  to  deal  with  them.  Here’s  me  in  one  about  jealousy.      Currently,  I’m  a  Project  Associate  working  for  Youth  Radio’s  Mobile  Action  Lab,  which  creates  applications  to  serve  community  needs.    As  we  get  more  and  more  connected  through  technology  instead  of  face-­‐to-­‐face  time,  it  is  possible  to  get  more  isolated.    But  
  • 7. in  the  Lab,  we  try  to  use  technology  to  help  people  connect  and  make  collaborations,  whether  it’s  for  collective  art  or  for  addressing  serious  issues  like  access  to  healthy  food  in  urban  communities.  You  can  see  more  about  the  App  Lab  here.    What  keeps  me  coming  back  to  Youth  Radio  is  not  only  the  opportunities  they  offer  but  because  of  the  family  that  we  have  become.    When  you  walk  into  Youth  Radio  you  feel  like  you’re  at  home.    In  my  personal  opinion,  Youth  Radio  is  one  of  the  best  things  that’s  going  on  in  my  life.    There  are  many  dreams  that  I  want  to  turn  into  reality.    In  the  beginning  I  had  a  difficult  time  presenting  in  front  of  people  but  in  due  time  it  became  a  habit  and  a  fear  that  I  overcame.    Another  thing  that  I  found  challenging  was  putting  all  of  these  different  peoples’  ideas  together  to  create  one.    There  were  several  obstacles  in  my  work  that  I  faced  that  I  thought  I  was  never  going  to  overcome,  but  I  faced  each  and  every  one  of  them  and  that’s  what  makes  me  the  person  I  am  today.    Ice  Breakage:     1. What  is  your  favorite  word?   My  favorite  word  is  childish.       2. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  hate?   I  think  the  one  of  the  most  irritating  noises  is  hearing  a  cat  constantly  meow.     3. Who  is  your  favorite  fictional  character?   My  favorite  fictional  characters  are  Phenias  and  Ferb  because  they  make   summer  seem  so  fun.    Everyday  they  are  creating  something  new  and  fun  to  do   and  everyone  in  the  neighborhood  can  participate.       4. What  profession  other  than  your  own  would  you  like  to  attempt?   One  profession  that  I  would  love  to  attempt  is  fashion  design.     5. If  you  could  have  a  meal  and  a  conversation  with  anyone,  throughout  history-­‐   who  would  it  be  and  what  would  you  eat?   If  I  could  have  a  meal  and  conversation  with  anyone,  I  think  it  would  have  to  be   Rosa  Parks,  and  I  think  I  would  take  her  to  BJ’s.                        
  • 8. Derek  Peer  Teaching  Intern      My  name  is  Derek  Williams.    I  am  19  years-­‐old  and  I  currently  live  in  Oakland,  CA.    I  joined  Youth  Radio  when  I  was  sophomore  in  High  School  and  I’m  currently  a  senior  getting  ready  to  graduate.      I  completed  six  months  of  training  at  Youth  Radio  and  graduated  the  advanced  program  with  a  focus  on  journalism.  I  then  went  on  to  intern  in  the  newsroom  where  I  wrote  a  series  of  web  posts  and  commentaries  that  aired  on  local  commercial  and  public  outlets  like  KCBS  and  KQED.    After  six  months  of  being  a  newsroom  intern,  I  decided  to  join  Youth  Radio’s  Education  Department  as  a  journalism  peer  teacher,  the  position  I  currently  hold.    I  teach  students  who  are  around  my  age  how  to  write  opinion  pieces  that  air  weekly  on  Youth  Radio  Raw,  our  training  focused  on-­‐line  radio  station,  and  live  on  introductory  class  blog.    I  got  into  peer  teaching  at  Youth  Radio  because  I  want  to  provide  the  same  experience  for  incoming  students  that  I  had  received  when  I  first  arrived.    I  want  to  show  other  young  people  that  they  too  can  have  a  voice  in  this  world  and  there  is  no  better  way  to  do  that  than  to  be  a  peer  teacher.      What  keeps  me  coming  back  to  Youth  Radio  is  the  atmosphere.    As  soon  as  I  step  foot  into  the  building  I  immediately  get  that  comfortable  feeling  of  family.    The  staff  and  my  peers  have  demonstrated  a  passion  for  helping  me  grow  professionally,  and  most  importantly  have  helped  me  find  my  voice  by  providing  me  with  the  right  media  tools  and  support.    Youth  Radio  has  been  the  only  place  where  I  feel  encouraged  each  day.    Staff  members  have  allowed  me  to  take  on  tasks  that  I  sometimes  questioned  I  could  complete,  but  with  their  trust  and  encouragement  I  always  fulfilled  what  was  needed  of  me.        I  consider  myself  a  leader  and  team  player,  someone  who  is  outgoing,  reliable,  resilient,  and  who  perseveres.    I  was  tested  in  these  areas  when  I  lost  my  mother  and  sister  eight  months  apart  from  each  other.    This  was  one  of  the  most  challenging  moments  in  my  life,  but  with  the  help  of  my  family  and  Youth  Radio  I  was  able  to  come  out  of  that  experience  a  stronger  and  more  determined  person.      The  following  are  links  to  some  of  my  media  assets  completed  at  Youth  Radio:  
  • 9.  KQED:       http://www.kqed.org/a/perspectives/R909100737  KCBS:     http://www.youthradio.org/news/becoming-­‐a-­‐nerd  Web  Posts:     http://www.youthradio.org/news/helping-­‐teens-­‐deal-­‐with-­‐grief   http://www.youthradio.org/news/swine-­‐flu-­‐facts-­‐teens    The  piece  I  did  for  KQED  was  done  five  months  after  my  mother’s  death  in  2009.    It  is  a  story  that  I  am  really  proud  of  as  it  speaks  to  the  type  of  relationship  me  and  mother  had  and  how  important  she  is  to  me.    “Becoming-­‐a-­‐nerd”  was  my  first  radio  commentary  it’s  about  my  trials  as  a  high  school  student  branching  out  and  doing  things  outside  the  status  quo.    I  am  very  proud  of  all  my  work  but  these  two  are  my  favorite.      Ice  Breakage:     1. What  is  your  favorite  word?   My  favorite  word  is  “awesome.”  It’s  a  great  way  to  express  emotions.     2. What  is  your  least  favorite  word?   My  least  favorite  word  is  “nigger”  and  all  the  derivatives  of  the  word.       3. What  is  a  natural  talent  that  you  might  not  have,  but  you  would  like  to  be  gifted   with?       I  have  always  wished  and  prayed  and  still  do  for  the  ability  to  sing.     4. What  is  your  favorite  sound?     I  love  the  sound  of  rolling  on  the  ground  laughter.       5. What  sound  or  noise  do  you  hate?   I  hate  the  sound  rocks  scraping  against  each  other.      
  • 10.  Belia  Media  Education  Manager    Hi,  my  name  is  Belia  Mayeno.  I’m  30  years  old,  and  I’m  an  educator,  writer  and  producer  at  Youth  Radio.    Like  many  of  our  adult  staff,  I’m  also  a  former  YR  student  (Spring  class  of  ’97.)    At  this  point,  I’ve  been  involved  with  Youth  Radio  for  almost  half  my  life,  and  I’ve  stayed  connected  for  a  few  reasons.    First,  this  place  looms  large  in  my  own  development  because  it  was  the  first  educational  institution  I’d  ever  encountered  where  I  was  encouraged  to  share  my  own  stories  and  expertise.    As  I  got  older,  it  was  through  leveraging  my  YR  media  production  work  that  I  was  able  to  get  broadcasting  scholarships  and  pay  for  my  college  education.    But  perhaps  most  importantly,  it  was  the  first  place  I  learned  to  really  love  youth  development  work  and  teaching.      I  come  from  a  very  diverse  family  background.    I’m  Xicana  of  Mexican  Indian  descent  (Cora/P’urhepècha)  third-­‐generation  Japanese-­‐American  &  Russian  Jewish  (This  is  what  we  call  “hella  mixed”  in  Oakland-­‐ese).    Because  my  parents  were  teenagers  when  they  had  me,  and  one  struggled  with  addiction,  gang  involvement  and  frequent  incarceration,  I  grew  up  within  an  extended  family  network.    This  exposed  me  to  a  variety  of  experiences  of  class,  citizenship,  education,  religion,  race  and  culture,  and  I  learned  to  be  keenly  aware  of  the  ways  that  these  factors  can  create  or  block  access  to  resources  and  opportunities.    My  commitment  to  transforming  these  inequalities  is  expressed  is  a  few  ways  in  my  work  with  Youth  Radio’s  MATCH  program.    Since  you  already  know  a  little  bit  about  Why  &  Where  I  do  the  work,  let’s  go  cross-­‐disciplinary  and  incorporate  more  of  the  standard  journalism  format  of  Who,  What,  When  and  How  to  dig  a  little  deeper.    First,  it’s  about  When  &  Who  we  teach.  At  this  time,  there  are  more  Black  men  in  prison  than  were  enslaved  in  1850,  and  they  make  up  40.2  percent  of  the  two  million  incarcerated  peoples  in  the  US.    Latino  &  Native/First  Nations  peoples  are  also  hugely  over-­‐represented  in  the  criminal  justice  system  and  vastly  under-­‐represented  in  institutions  of  higher  learning,  so  after-­‐school  job  training  and  education  become  a  critical  intervention  in  the  “school  to  prison”  pipeline  for  poor/working-­‐class  youth  and  
  • 11. youth  of  color.    In  MATCH,  all  the  students  are  recently  released  from  youth  incarceration  and  are  on  probation.    Second,  it’s  about  What  we  teach.    We  use  media  as  a  hook  to  get  young  people  in  the  door.    They  often  come  for  music  production  training  and  to  hear  themselves  on  the  air.    But  then  we  flip  it,  and  use  these  formats  to  support  them  in  increasing  their  written  and  oral  communication  skills,  as  well  as  their  critical  thinking  skills  about  issues  affecting  their  lives.    Topics  include  the  prison  industrial  complex,  gender  socialization,  and  how  the  dominant  media  has  historically  used  negative  imagery  of  people  of  color  as  a  means  to  rationalize  racism  and  colonization.      Finally,  it’s  about  HOW  we  teach.    We  cannot  support  young  people  in  self-­‐empowerment  and  community  engagement  if  we  use  alienating  teaching  methods.    Our  work  in  MATCH  is  influenced  by  the  Paulo  Freire’s  “Pedagogy  of  the  Oppressed,”  which  holds  that  we  are  all  simultaneously  teachers  AND  students,  and  that  we  all  have  the  right  and  responsibility  to  co-­‐create  our  learning  experiences  together.    In  this  way,  young  people  take  leadership  roles  and  we  all  hold  each  other  accountable  when  someone  transgresses  the  group  agreements.    And  although  I  do  not  often  speak  directly  about  this  to  students,  I  also  bring  my  own  perspective  as  a  priest  in  the  Afro-­‐Cuban  Lucumì  faith  to  my  work,  because  our  tradition  strongly  emphasizes  cascading  mentorship  and  inter-­‐generational  learning  models.      If  you’d  like  to  check  out  a  more  scholarly  analysis  of  Youth  Radio’s  educational  models,  click  here  to  read  about  “Drop  That  Knowledge,”  written  by  our  Senior  Producer  and  Research  Director,  Dr.  Elisabeth  Soep.      And  here’s  a  link  to  me  and  Dr.  Soep  discussing  our  media  and  youth  development  work  on  a  San  Francisco  public  radio  show.    Ice  Breakage:     1. What  is  your  favorite  word?   Kansha  (The  Japanese  word  for  the  experience  of  gratitude).     2. What  is  your  least  favorite  word?   Smug.     3. What  is  one  talent  that  you  might  not  have,  but  would  like  to  be  gifted  with?   I’d  like  to  have  a  natural  affinity  for  learning  new  languages.    But  this  wish  is  tied   with  my  other  deep  desire  to  learn  how  to  play  the  accordion  really  well  (Not  a   joke).     4. If  you  could  have  a  meal  and  a  conversation  with  anyone,  throughout  history-­‐   who  would  it  be  and  what  would  you  eat?   Ceviche,  tamales  and  tequila  with  Frida  Kahlo,  surrounded  by  all  her  pet   monkeys  and  parrots.    
  • 12. 5. Who  is  your  favorite  fictional  character?   Half  of  me  says  Omar  from  The  Wire.  The  other  half  says  Anne  of  Green  Gables.