The Networked Health Organization

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/9106159http://www.flickr.com/photos/65359853@N00/5495895362/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/@N02/2036854395/sizes/o/
  • Free Agents and Nonprofits in A Networked World
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  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile …Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • They also know that in order to have more impact, they need to scale. They wanted to go beyond having social media be a silo in the communications department, and through the Target experience they realized the value of employee use of social networks/social media. They worked on a social media policy, guidelines and an operational manual so that anyone working in affiliates as well as national could be ambassador on social networks. The guidelines also extend to volunteers. The overall policy is encouraging, not controlling. The operational handbook gives them specific steps, examples, and tips for being effective.
  • Take Shawn Ahmed for example ….Shawn Ahmed is 29 year-old Canadian from Toronto and is the founder of the “The Uncultured Project.” He raises money and awareness on the issue of extreme global poverty. He is idealistic, facile with social media and works outside the walls of an institution. He’s passionate about wanted to end global poverty and wants to do it on his terms.But as he acknowledges, that he can’t do it alone.http://www.flickr.com/photos/uncultured/1173511851/
  • By sharing this journey on social networks like YouTube and Twitter, he is inspiring other people to talk about issue of global poverty and take action, and as he says He has started a social movement in the palm of his handsBut what happens when he reaches out to nonprofits? Do they embrace him?
  • We witnessed this collision first hand during our session on the Networked Nonprofit at the NTEN NTC Conference as Shawn’s frustration with traditional organizations spilled over. He grabbed the microphone to address the room full of nonprofit professionals and said, “the problem isn’t social media, the problem is that YOU are the fortress.Social media is not my problem: I have over a quarter million followers on Twitter, 10,800 subscribers on YouTube, and 2.1 million views. Yet, despite that, I have a hard time having you guys take me seriously. “: I have over a quarter million followers on Twitter, and 2.1 million views on YouTube. I have a hard time having you guys take me seriously.
  • He turned and pointed a finger at Wendy Harman from the Red Cross who was in the room. He told the room full of nonprofits staffers …..When the Haiti earthquake struck, I contacted the Red Cross. I offered to connect the community supporting my work with your efforts in Haiti. But I was dismissed as ‘just a guy on YouTube’”.
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  • So November (diabetes awareness month) is over and the Big Blue Test event we held this year is also behind us. We are so proud and happy about the results that I wanted to share them here, so we could all celebrate together as a TuDiabetes family!Maybe you know the story by now, but in case you don't, the video has accumulated more than 123,000 views and we passed 100,000 views some time between Nov. 13 and Nov. 14 (depending on where in the world you live). So we reached the goal!As a result of this, Roche will soon be sending their donation of $75,000 to the Diabetes Hands Foundation. Of these funds, $74,000 will be regranted to two charities:* Half will go to Insulin For Life.* The other half, to International Diabetes Federation, earmarked for their Life for a Child program.Both are humanitarian programs that assist children with diabetes in need in third world countries (at times, Insulin For Life works with Life For a Child to source particular needs). Based on their past record track and their past financial reports, we estimated that roughly each of the first 100,000 views (the ones that counted towards the donation) translated into approximately one week's worth of insulin given to a child in need.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photohttp://www.slideshare.net/jeremiah_owyang/career-social-strategist?from=embeds/jeremiah_owyang/5162385707/The culture of acompany directly influences how they develop their organizational formation. Weidentified five models for how companies organize for social media, and asked SocialStrategists how they’re currently formed. Nearly 60% of surveyed Social Strategistsclassified their organizational model as “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke”(also known as “Dandelion”), in which a central hub provides guidance, resources andcoordination to business units (See Figure 5). We found that 82% of those in theseorganizational models had reached sophistication, self-identifying their programs asFormalized, Mature, or Advanced. Expect more companies to model in either “Hub andSpoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke,” as these formations are best equipped to scale tomeet demands from both internal and external stakeholders4
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  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • The Networked Health Organization

    1. The Networked Health Organization:Leveraging Social Media to Serve Your Mission<br />Flickr photo by rosefirerising<br />Beth Kanter, ZoeticaUC Berkeley Center for Health Leadership<br />
    2. The Networked Health Organization<br />AGENDA<br />OUTCOMES<br /><ul><li> Introduction/Ice Breaker
    3. Overview of Networked Nonprofit Framework
    4. Theme 1: Social Culture
    5. Theme 2: Simplicity
    6. Theme 3: Mistakes
    7. Reflection</li></ul>Leave the room with a basic understanding of being a networked health organization and one small step<br />FRAMING<br /><ul><li>Senior Leaders
    8. Learning from adjacent practices
    9. Interactive
    10. http://bit.ly/health-orgs</li></li></ul><li>10 Second Introductions<br />NameTitle<br />Organization<br />Flickr Photo by John K <br />
    11. Quick Poll<br />How many are monitoring what people say on social channels about your organization or issue area?<br />How many have a social media policy?<br />Staffing?<br />Does your organization use ….<br />Facebook<br />Twitter<br />Blog<br />YouTube<br />Other<br />
    12. Networked NGOs in the Arab World<br />
    13. Social media is a disruptive technology because of the connectedness of living in a networked world. We see it in our personal lives first. But it is also having a profound impact on the way health organizations and nonprofits do their work, communicate with stakeholders, and deliver programs.<br />Disruption is our friend ….. <br />
    14. Not at all<br />Very<br />How comfortable are you personally social media?<br />Social media canhelp us achieve results that support our mission<br />No<br />Not sure<br />Yes<br />Social media is so much a part of everyone’s life that health organizations must use social media to be successful now or in the future<br />Agree Strongly<br />Disagree Strongly<br />Human Spectragram<br />
    15. What is a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
    16. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
    17. Red Cross Case Study<br />
    18. Smart Social Objective: Stakeholder Empowerment to Spread Mission<br />First Step: Robust and agile listening and engagement system<br />
    19. Listen: Monitor, Compile, Distribute<br />I took an American Red Cross class I thought was less than satisfactory. […] The local chapter director. called me to talk about it honestly. They care about me and they’re willing to go the extra mile. I am now significantly more likely to take another class than I was before.” - Blogger<br />
    20. Listening Drove Adoption<br />
    21. Influencer complaining …<br />Customer service issue<br />Relationship building<br />Engagement<br />
    22. A Rule Book<br />
    23. Scale<br />
    24. Integrated Social Content Strategy<br />
    25. Capacity<br />
    26. Wendy Harman<br />Director, Social Media<br />Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training<br />Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan<br />Get Buy-In from Stakeholders<br />Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy<br />Gets Tools and Technologies in place<br />Facilitate policy and procedures<br />Community manager<br />Two Full-Time Staff Members<br />
    27. Social Media’s Role in Disaster Relief Effort in Haiti <br />
    28. Working with Free Agents, Brand Ambassadors, and Others<br />Leveraging Your Network!<br />
    29. Shawn AhmedFree Agent<br />
    30. “The problem is that YOU are the fortress.Social media is not my problem.“<br />
    31. Now working together on a project<br />
    32. Share Pair: What resonated? What insights did you gain that you can apply to your organization? What have you thought about before?<br />Flickr photo: Otis Archives<br />
    33. Theme 1: Social Culture<br />
    34. Loss of control over their branding and marketing messages<br />Dealing with negative comments<br />Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)<br />Make mistakes<br />Make senior staff too accessible<br />Privacy and security concerns<br />Perception of wasted of time and resources <br />Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more<br />
    35. Conversation starters, not stoppers<br />
    36. Explore the possibilities – how are your stakeholders and other health organizations using social media?<br />
    37. The fans of the page and the friends of my identity, have become patients after i expressed empathy for their expressions of being ill<br />- Dr. Enoch Choi, PAMF<br />
    38. “I only provide medical advice via our HIPAA compliant iPhone app, but not on insecure FB or twitter. “<br />
    39. Video<br />
    40. Small Pilots<br />
    41. The Rule Book: Social Media Policy<br /><ul><li> Encouragement and support
    42. Why policy is needed
    43. Cases when it will be used, distributed
    44. Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    45. Guidelines
    46. Identity and transparency
    47. Responsibility
    48. Confidentiality
    49. Judgment and common sense
    50. Best practices
    51. Tone
    52. Expertise
    53. Respect
    54. Quality
    55. Additional resources
    56. Training
    57. Operational Guidelines
    58. Escalation
    59. Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com</li></ul>Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group<br />
    60. Share Pair: What does your health organization need to do to become more social?<br />Flickr photo: Otis Archives<br />
    61. You want me to start Tweeting too? <br />Simplicity: From scarcity to abundance …<br />
    62. Leverage the Network <br />
    63. Who will do the work?<br />
    64. Wendy Harman<br />Director, Social Media<br />Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training<br />Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan<br />Get Buy-In from Stakeholders<br />Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy<br />Gets Tools and Technologies in place<br />Facilitate policy and procedures<br />Community manager<br />Two Full-Time Staff Members<br />
    65. Social Media Team, although the word “social media” is being replaced by “emerging,” “interactive,” or “online.” <br />Strategy<br />Implementation<br />Community Manager<br />
    66. Strategy for Scale: Internal/External<br />
    67. Share Pair:What could your organization do less of to allow for more capacity to implement social media? How will your organization do the work? <br />
    68. Handling Mistakes<br />x<br />“MisTweet” – A tweet intended to come from a personal account but sent out on an organizational account by mistake. <br />
    69. This “MisTweet” by a Red Cross employee was out for an hour before Wendy Harman got a call in the middle of the night.<br />
    70. Disaster recovery on the tweet …. <br />
    71. Apologized and share on their blog<br />
    72. Employee confessed on Twitter<br />
    73. Got picked up by mainstream media and blogs<br />
    74. What are your takeaways about social media mistakes from this story?<br /><ul><li>You can’t hide or not respond
    75. Act quickly
    76. Admit the mistake, stakeholders are forgiving
    77. Use humor when appropriate
    78. Build your network before you need it
    79. Employees should use different Twitter apps for personal/organizational tweeting
    80. If the mistake had been damaging to the organization, a social media policy would have been critical if taking appropriate action</li></li></ul><li>Reflection and Closing<br />What is one idea that you can put into practice?<br />What resources do you need to be successful?<br />What are the challenges?<br />What is one small step you can take tomorrow? <br />
    81. Thank you<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />http://bit.ly/networkednp<br />http://bit.ly/health-orgs<br />

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