Social Media for ChangeMakers
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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/socialgoodbrasil/8179199091/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobcatnorth/1199505016/sizes/l/
  • U.S. President @BarackObama is still the most followed world leader on Twitter with 33,510,157 followers as of 1 July 2013 and is the fourth most popular account in the Twitterverse, just behind Lady Gaga. Two-thirds (68%) of world leaders have established mutual connections with their peers on Twitter. Swedish Foreign Minister @CarlBildt is the best connected world leader, mutually following 44 peers. - See more at: http://www.bethkanter.org/?p=9143&preview=true#sthash.CMoeY7R8.dpufAs you can see networks are a part of our every day and social change is be becoming network-centric.Nonprofits need to do – connect with their networks to create on the ground change. …Collaboration, coordination, and working in networks are becoming the new normal, as leaders across sectors work to move the needle on today’s most pressing problems. Individuals and organizationsare taking increasing advantage of technology’s ability to facilitate and expand their impact through connection, coordination, and collaboration. Using data to understand what is working or not.
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2012/Oct/Networked-and-Hyperconnected.aspxDigital Revolution 1: BroadbandInternet (85%) and Broadband at home (66%)Revolution 2: Mobile – 89% of adultsDigital Revolution 3:Social networking – 72% of all adultshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/51541045@N06/8663772811/sizes/o/in/photolist-ecA6Pi-9zmDs8-a8q2qL-dVxkYT-bkWwB9-a9g4FV-9YdVHZ-9DnoMC-8Y72va-c21yrG-7LaMDC-dWCGm6-9aRmCN-fkWD4W-a1SCfx-83rwo6-9ZPLrU-7zHo4h-avVij4-cp5dpu-eTcK5w-949gre-9Lmchv-7W3aq1-gtMuj9-94vwRj-byD8a1-97QuS9-ayb3dt-9bq1KJ-7zuUJG-cTtMX1-e9b8T7-941CWz-9Jk75u-eF84dF-9wRXE7-9NJgcm-8r7b9W-cNV1D9-7Yfagh-dJYCw6-8pQJzS-b9MArn-bGCeGF-8o25t7-bGU2nZ-ecSurP-8if7Ra-8qZu6X-8r3V4y/
  • "We'd like to thank Blazer for her heroic efforts," the Multnomah County Animal Services website reads. "Sir Stuffington's Facebook Page will not only help him and his siblings find homes, it's also a wonderful example of how people can make a difference and get involved with Portland's own local shelter—either by volunteering, fostering or donating."He is the cutest one-eyed, disfigured pirate cat you've ever seen.Over the past few days, pictures of Sir Stuffington (pictured above) have been widely sharedonline, making him the latest in a rich tradition of feline internet obsession. But there's so much more to Sir Stuffington than his adorable and funny Facebook photos. His story is one of perseverance and love, as well as internet fame.Earlier this month, the cat and his two brothers were taken into Multnomah County Animal Services, an open-door animal shelter in Troutdale, Oregon. Sir Stuffington wasn't in good shape—his damaged jaw, his missing eye, his upper respiratory infection, his heart murmur, his body covered in fleas and dirt. (All three were about six weeks old, and came in withcalicivirus.) But even before the kittens had been taken to the shelter, local resident Blazer Schaffer had stumbled upon a Facebook photo of Sir Stuffington suffering in the street, and was determined to track him down. Schaffer, an animal lover who has worked with the shelter for a decade, soon found the three kitten there. She promptly took them home as their foster parent, and is taking care of them at least for a couple months until they're healthy enough for adoption.Let tell you about this wonderful story about Sir Stuffingon– a cute kitten that had its eye scratched out by a raccoon – and was brought into an animal shelter in Oregon by a teenager who has no formal connection to the shelter other being a fan on Facebook … --- the teen wanted to make sure that the kitten found a good home and medical care for its.. So, he started a Facebook Page – that included photos of the kitty – and to help find a home. The page got over 36,000 likes in 24 hours. It attracted the attention of the local TV station, but also national news – NPR, online blogs – and people started to donated, tell their friends – before you know it – they not only had someone who would adopt Sir Stuffington and his siblings, but had the medical expenses covered – plus many other animals in the shelter were adopted. All because a teenager was able to leverage their networks -- These tools allow us to scale very quickly -- connect with others, and make change happen on the ground .. Outside the walls of institutions.http://multcopets.org/news/sir-stuffingtons-storyhttps://www.facebook.com/Sir.Stuffington?ref=br_tfThese trends are making networks part of our everyday and social change is becoming network-centric, happening anyplace, anywhereh – in the palm of our hands.As you can see networks are a part of our every day and social change is be becoming network-centric.Nonprofits need to do – connect with their networks to create on the ground change. …Collaboration, coordination, and working in networks are becoming the new normal, as leaders across sectors work to move the needle on today’s most pressing problems. One of the words he used caught my attention:  Philanthroteens.     These are teens with a passion for social change and who grew up not knowing what it was like to not to have a cell phone  or be connected to Facebook.      The media has dubbed this generation – “Qwerty Monsters” who send hundreds of text messages a day and don’t even like to use their phone for calls (and with two pre-teens in my house, I can attest this is true).     But it is more than the technology, it is also their passion to do good in the world.He shared the story of  the first-ever Girl Up Leadership Summit which brought together young girls who are helping change the face of global philanthropy.  They were joined by celebrities like actress and Girl Up Champion Monique Coleman, global leader Ambassador MelanneVerveer, and more than 100 young women from across the country.  These philanthroteens lead workshops on advocacy, communications and learned about their peers in developing countries.  Their meeting featured a special conversation via Skype with girls in South Africa as part of the Girl Up  Campaign’s emphasis on uniting girls around the world.
  • I’ve been working in nonprofit tech for twenty years, one of the things that I learned – organizations and people don’t change by telling them they’re behind, old school, or hurry up …. Or maybe it helps wake you up .. But to make the change strategically, you have to work incrementally …I’ve developed a maturity of practice framework for social media - that looks at 7 practice areas and what each practice area looks like at various stages of maturityIt is inspired by this MLK quoteSo, it can help you identify where you are in terms of the practice and identify the next incremental stage of development …So, maybe you won’t be “flying” in every area, but if you improve from crawling to walking – you’ve made progress …
  • DescribePOLL
  • What did you learn about your host organization’s Networked Nonprofit practice?What surprised you? Where do you think you can be helpful?
  • MIKE WHITE IS A RELATIVELY NEW PARTNER WHO IS ALSO ON THE BOARD AND HAS A STARTUP FOCUSED ON A MOBILE PLATFORM FOR "DOING SOMETHING" FOR SOCIAL GOOD. MIKE IS ATTENDING THE WORKSHOP and SAID YES to the LIVING CASE STUDY.Mike White | Social Inertia | Act Onhttp://www.linkedin.com/pub/michael-white/4/855/717http://about.me/MichaelWhite24https://twitter.com/ActOnApp
  • What did you learn about your host organization’s Networked Nonprofit practice?What surprised you? Where do you think you can be helpful?
  • This is the overview of the framework .. We’re going to deep into measurement in the next segment.
  • In addition to moving ahead on the specific culture indicators, we followed the lead of colleagues on the call to set up a tracker for our progress across the crawl-walk-run-fly model. The tracker has been circulated to management team and development staff.
  • Let’s look at some of the first steps of this change …The first step is to understand, feed, and tune your networksNetworks consist of people and organizationsYou have your professional network – and your organization has a network – there are connected.
  • MEDIC MOBILE - A CURRENT SV2 GRANTEE THAT IS RELATIVELY ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA (ED JOHN NESBITT WILL NOT BE AT THE WORKSHOP)http://medicmobile.org/https://www.facebook.com/MedicMobilehttps://twitter.com/medichttps://rally.org/medichttps://twitter.com/joshnesbithttps://twitter.com/Medic
  • MEDIC MOBILE - A CURRENT SV2 GRANTEE THAT IS RELATIVELY ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA (ED JOHN NESBITT WILL NOT BE AT THE WORKSHOP)http://medicmobile.org/https://www.facebook.com/MedicMobilehttps://twitter.com/medichttps://rally.org/medichttps://twitter.com/joshnesbithttps://twitter.com/Medic
  • MEDIC MOBILE - A CURRENT SV2 GRANTEE THAT IS RELATIVELY ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA (ED JOHN NESBITT WILL NOT BE AT THE WORKSHOP)http://medicmobile.org/https://www.facebook.com/MedicMobilehttps://twitter.com/medichttps://rally.org/medichttps://twitter.com/joshnesbithttps://twitter.com/Medic
  • MEDIC MOBILE - A CURRENT SV2 GRANTEE THAT IS RELATIVELY ACTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA (ED JOHN NESBITT WILL NOT BE AT THE WORKSHOP)http://medicmobile.org/https://www.facebook.com/MedicMobilehttps://twitter.com/medichttps://rally.org/medichttps://twitter.com/joshnesbithttps://twitter.com/Medic
  • But, it isn’t just a spectator sport, it’s a contact sport – you have to be presence and engage ..This is the hard part … especially for CEOs of a certain age – this shift ..
  • As the leader and voice for your nonprofit organization, should you as the CEO or executive director use social media as part of your organizational or personal leadership tool set?    Certainly, your marketing communications staff has talked about the benefits of effective social media integration that personalizes your organization’s brand with the voice of its leader – you.   But getting into the habit of regular tweeting, Facebooking, or experimenting with new tools like Instagram is another story.It’s not that you don’t think it is a good idea.   But you are probably, like most who work in the social change sector, incredibly busy.   Maybe you are muttering to yourself  ”Who can find the time to do social media?”    It isn’t a matter of finding the time, it is a matter of making the time and starting with some steps.    Have a conversation with your social media team and ask these questions:What do you spend time doing now that you could do better via social?What other executive directors in your field that you respect, follow or and feel inspired by are using social creatively?What are your strengths and preferences and what is the best match in terms of social channels?How will social improve things you already KNOW and value?The executive director for the ACLU-NJ, UdiOfer, had that exact conversation with his staff when he was started last February and set up a Twitter account @UdiACLU and started using Instagramand YouTube to answer questions about marriage equality, DOMA, police misconduct, and other issues on the organization’s docket.    While the communications department has suggested the idea, he was on board from the start.  He does his own all of his own tweeting and as his communications staff reports, “enthusiastically at that!”Udi was not on Twitter before he started tweeting for his organization and was a Twitter novice, but he was opened to sitting down with his communications staff for a half hour tutorial where they showed him the basics of using Twitter and how to do it from his mobile phone.  What did the trick was a “How To Tweet” cheat sheet that not only included the simple mechanics, but also sample tweets from other ACLU leaders around the country, subtle form of peer pressure. Says Eliza Stram, ACLU-NJ Communications Associate, “I was able to make the sometimes intimidating prospect of tweeting approachable and very doable. In other words, if your peer at another ACLU Affiliate can do it, then so can you!”Stram also says that her new boss was very open and enthusiastic in trying out this new way of communication with reporters, civil liberties activists, and their supporters.  Says Stram, “Without that openness, I don’t believe he would be having nearly as much fun with Twitter as he is now.”By using twitter, the ACLU-NJ’s is not just sharing what ate for breakfast, Udi provides quotes on his organization’s most important cases and issues to reporters, in addition to their traditional press release or emailed statement.  He is also publicly debating civil liberties issues with reporters, lawyers and followers.   As Eliza notes, “Something that would have been impossible to do unless you were sitting with him in his office. ”  There is the occasional personal tweet, but these serve to make him seem approachable and human.While Udi is the face of the ACLU-NJ in the organization’s “official” communications such as press releases or in newspaper articles or sound bytes on the evening news,  Twitter has become the place where he injects warmth into the organization.     Says Eliza, “This is accomplished through the “Ask Udi Anything” project, which asked ACLU-NJ’s followers to pose questions about his goals for the organization and even what his favorite karaoke song is! By answering the public’s questions in a video Udi became an accessible, humorous, and more personal face for the ACLU-NJ.”Udi is just one example of nonprofit CEOs and leaders who use Twitter and other social media platforms.   Take for exampleRobert Falls who is the artistic director of the Goodman Theater he not only uses his personal Twitter account to highlight the Goodman’s shows, but also to share creative ideas, connect with peers, and discuss the art of theatre.Getting Past the Learning CurveDon’t let the learning curve get in the way of adopting social media as a personal and organizational leadership tool for your organization as Alexandra Samuel advises in this recent post on the WSJ.   While learning any new skill or tool will feel daunting when you start, if you can get started with small steps and practice it daily for a short amount of time, like Udi you’ll be a whiz in a matter of weeks.     Samuel also offers some ways to approach social media as a personal leadership tool.  This include:Create a Leadership Dashboard:  Using a tool like Mention or Feedly, you can put together a small list of leadership blogs or publications and set aside 15 minutes a day to read.Stay Focused:  Use online visualize tools to mindmap ideasAmplify Your Voice:   If you are sharing articles suggested your staff or colleagues “read this,”  switch the channel to something like Twitter.Social Media Golf Course:   Find a tool or channel that is simply fun and have some play time.If you are a nonprofit CEO, how did you get comfortable with incorporating social media into your personal and organizational leadership tool kit?   What support and encouragement did your staff provide?   Do you have an “ah ha” moment from social media a leadership tool that convinced you it wasn’t a waste of time?
  • Amy Boroff (@njdevmgr), development manager for Junior Achievement of NJ in Princeton [emphasis added], discovered one of her new Twitter followers was Kate Specchio (@ecsfoundation), co-founder of Morris County-based The Emily C. Specchio Foundation. Through their tweets, Amy recognized the potential for working together. They continued to communicate on Twitter in real-time, after working hours, to learn more about each respective organization. After several weeks, JANJ submitted a proposal to ECS for funding for an inaugural event: the Women's Future Leadership Forum. The ECS Foundation accepted the proposal and granted funds to help support aspiring female high school students become future leaders.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/staff-guidelines/
  • Influencers: Individuals who are passionate about your mission and have the power or ability to affect someone’s actions. Champions: Influencers who sign on to a formal program for Brand Champions and use their social channels and networks to support your organization.
  • Module 2: Understanding Networks and Networked MindsetsNetworked Mindset and Social Organizations Social Media Policy Social Media Staffing and Capacity Changing nature of social networks Understanding networks How to map an organization’s network PPT20 minutesWork on Maps or Other Activities20 minutesShare Maps20 minutesHandout: Revise so it matches slidesAlternative Activities (add to handout and make slides)Students will create a network map of their host organization’s networks based on interview with host or observation and will map organization's Twitter network (http://twiangulate.com/) Students will review these Twitter Nonprofit CEO lists and pick one that is a great example of a Social CEOhttp://list.ly/list/3vV-curated-lists-of-lists-of-nonprofit-and-philanthropy-ceos-on-twitterStudies will review social media guidelines for all staff examples and review host organization's social media policyhttp://www.bethkanter.org/staff-guidelines/
  • Image from Working WikilyA portfolio of both strong and weak ties is useful to individuals a network society.  Social media can help maintain larger networks of weak ties, but only a limited number of strong-tie relationships can be maintained irrespective of media.One’s position in social networks matters.  Centrality – how many people and networks go through you to connect with each other – can be more important than the number of connections.Diverse networks are collectively smarter and provide a richer variety of resources to participating nodes.
  • Social network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
  • Social network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
  • https://wiki.library.ucsf.edu/display/EdTechStrategic/1.+Stakeholders+MapMap Definitions:Loosely Linked stakeholders are those, above the horizon line, who have more informal relationships.Target Audiences  are people or organizations that directly use your programs or servicesOther Constituents are loosely linked people or organizations who have interests in your programs as end-users.Tightly Linked stakeholders are those, below the horizon line, who have formal relationships. Staff includes all employeesAligned Partners include contract employees, vendors, and materials and equipment suppliers.Boards are any decision making groups with financial and management oversightDefine the stakeholder categoriesSpend 1 minute writing down stakeholders in any category - one per sticky note - write large and legibly Kevin will facilitate the gathering, clustering and clarification of the stakeholdersProduce a final map that reflects this discussion
  • https://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Graph.aspx?graphID=14760https://nodexlgraphgallery.org/Pages/Graph.aspx?graphID=15075Module 2: Understanding Networks and Networked MindsetsNetworked Mindset and Social Organizations Social Media Policy Social Media Staffing and Capacity Changing nature of social networks Understanding networks How to map an organization’s network PPT20 minutesWork on Maps or Other Activities20 minutesShare Maps20 minutesHandout: Revise so it matches slidesAlternative Activities (add to handout and make slides)Students will create a network map of their host organization’s networks based on interview with host or observation and will map organization's Twitter network (http://twiangulate.com/) Students will review these Twitter Nonprofit CEO lists and pick one that is a great example of a Social CEOhttp://list.ly/list/3vV-curated-lists-of-lists-of-nonprofit-and-philanthropy-ceos-on-twitterStudies will review social media guidelines for all staff examples and review host organization's social media policyhttp://www.bethkanter.org/staff-guidelines/
  • Structural hole is a space between clusters or nodes in your networkBy connecting these clusters or for individuals “closing triangles” you are the brokerThis create more opportunity for new ideas, innovation, scaling, and linking your network to your social media strategy gives the potential for more impact..http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelsimmons/2013/12/03/why-being-the-most-connected-is-a-vanity-metric/
  • Here is an example using online tool for network weaving. We hope to do a lot of network weaving with our online community site. If you’re going to use Day 3 to get people set up with Facebook or Twitter, this might be a good way for you to communicate between sessions.
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/11/11/why-do-journalists-prefer-twitter-to-facebook/http://philanthropy.com/blogs/the-giveaway/more-foundation-ceos-start-to-tweet/557http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/journalists-twitter_b45416
  • https://twitter.com/GreensforGreehttps://twitter.com/GreensforGreens/status/420701784600891393ns
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/1-step-01/
  • 1.  Why should someone care about your? When possible, leverage an emotional connection.2.  Be distinctive. For example were you the first or only one to do something? Perhaps you are the largest or oldest. These distinctives help set you apart and provide credibility.3. Don’t forget the basics. Who does your organization/endeavor benefit? How does your  organization benefit someone?4. Finish with an ‘ask’ to follow.
  • http://blog.sfgate.com/rheingold/2009/05/11/twitter-literacy-i-refuse-to-make-up-a-twittery-name-for-it/To oversimplify, I think successful use of Twitter means knowing how to tune the network of people you follow, and how to feed the network of people who follow you.
  • Bruce Lesley 
  • Quick way to find influencershttp://www.postplanner.com/find-top-influencers-on-twitter/http://hashtagify.me/http://www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/tweet-chatshttp://www.socialbrite.org/2011/12/27/45-hashtags-for-social-change/
  • To encourage retweets, to make your tweets shorter than 140 characters ..
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/pruzicka/335467743/sizes/l/
  • http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/21/nomophobia-attacks-harris-says-74-of-users-panic-over-phone-loss-58-of-us-cant-stay-away-from-mobiles-for-more-than-an-hour/We have to cover a lot of ground in our work today and do it while logged on to the greatest tool for distraction and procrastination ever invented! And now we can access the Internet anytime, anywherehttp://techcrunch.com/2012/06/21/nomophobia-attacks-harris-says-74-of-users-panic-over-phone-loss-58-of-us-cant-stay-away-from-mobiles-for-more-than-an-hour/Nearly 60% said they don’t go an hour without checking their phone. Younger folks were the most addicted: 63% of women and 73% of men ages 18-34 say they don’t go an hour without checking their phones.Our connection never sleeps. 54% said they check their phones while lying in bed: before they go to sleep, after they wake up, even in the middle of the night.We need access everywhere. Nearly 40% admit to checking their phone while on the toilet.Learning how to use mindfulness online is an essential work place skill!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tzofia/270800047/sizes/m/in/photostream/http://www.flickr.com/photos/lululemonathletica/5724696305/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tracyhunter/144845928/sizes/l/
  • Share pair 2 xThink and Write index card – one thing to put into practiceBring into the circleMake one commitment for advancing their social media strategyOne word to resonate with you today …Future
  • http://bit.ly/network-leadership

Social Media for ChangeMakers Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Social Change In An Age of Networks: What Philanthropists and the Nonprofits They Support Need to Know To Survive and Thrive Beth Kanter, Master Trainer, Author, and Speaker January, 2014 – SV2
  • 2. Your Burning Questions! Welcome Please write down your burning questions on a sticky note and post. What do you want answered by the end of the workshop?
  • 3. Social Change In An Age of Networks: What Philanthropists and the Nonprofits They Support Need to Know To Survive and Thrive Beth Kanter, Master Trainer, Author, and Speaker January, 2014 – SV2
  • 4. Beth Kanter: Master Trainer, Author, and ChangeMaker
  • 5. Rapid Introductions (15 seconds) Your Name, Affiliation Grantee or Partner
  • 6. Share Pair • Find someone in the room you don’t know and share your burning question
  • 7. The Agenda AGENDA OUTCOMES • Introduction Networked Nonprofits and Networked Mindsets Networked Toolsets– Using Twitter Strategically Mindful Social Media Reflection One small step to improve your organization’s or your personal use of social media to achieve your goals FRAMING Interactive Reflective Participatory #netnon http://bethkanter.wikispaces.com/sv2
  • 8. Warning: Some Translation May Be Needed
  • 9. Stand up, Sit Down: Tools and Results
  • 10. Networked Nonprofits Defined Simple, agile, and transparent nonprofits. They are experts at using networks and social media tools to make the world a better place.
  • 11. Social Change is Increasingly Network-Centric
  • 12. 3 Digital Revolutions Broadband NGO Photography Mobile Social Networks
  • 13. If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
  • 14. Maturity of Practice: Networkd Nonprofits - Organizations CRAWL WALK Communications Strategy Development Linking Social with Results and Networks Culture Change Pilot: Focus one campaign or channel RUN Ladder of Engagement Content Strategy Incremental Capacity Best Practices Some measurement and learning in all above FLY Network Building Many champions & Influencers Multi-Channel Engagement, Content, and Measurement Reflection and Continuous Improvement
  • 15. Need Translation?
  • 16. Use As An Individual - ChangeMaker CRAWL Aware of the tools Dabbled or don’t use Not even sure where to begin A little scary WALK Using at least one platform RUN Have a goal and strategy Don’t have a goal and strategy Use one or more platforms Don’t have a regular routine Have routine of use Need more techniques and fluency FLY Have a goal and strategy Use one or more platforms Have a routine of use Read articles about best practices and apply
  • 17. Living Case Study • How has social media enriched your professional work? • What are some of the challenges? • CWRF? What do you need to get to next level?
  • 18. What is your practice now? What do you need to get to the next stage? CRAWL WALK RUN FLY
  • 19. Maturity of Practice: Crawl-Walk-Run-Fly Categories CULTURE Practices Networked Mindset Institutional Support CAPACITY Staffing Strategy MEASUREMENT Analysis Tools Adjustment LISTENING Brand Monitoring Influencer Research ENGAGEMENT Ladder of Engagement CONTENT Integration/Optimization NETWORK Influencer Engagement Relationship Mapping 1 2 3 4 http://bethkanter.wikispaces.com/sv2
  • 20. CWRF Tracker “It helps us put some focused attention into our strategy and practice. I’ve set some defined goals and areas where we might be able to leap to the next level. It isn’t realistic to jump in all of the categories.”
  • 21. A Network Mindset: A Leadership Style • • • • • • • Openness, transparency, decentralized decision-making, and collective action. Listening and cultivating organizational and professional networks to achieve the impact Leadership through active participation. Social Media Policy living document, all staff participate including leaders Sharing control of decision-making Communicating through a network model, rather than a broadcast model Data-Informed
  • 22. From CEO to CNO (Chief Networking Officer) Feeding and tuning professional and organizational networks
  • 23. Benefits: One CEO Tweet = 1,000 by Brand
  • 24. CEO Voice
  • 25. Brand Voice
  • 26. Mobile Medic/Josh Nesbit
  • 27. Organizational Leaders Are Authentic Open and accessible to the world and building relationships Making interests, hobbies, passions visible creates authenticity
  • 28. No Ghost Tweeting
  • 29. The Social Nonprofit CEO What do they spend time doing that they could do better via social ? Whose work do they respect or feel inspired by? http://www.bethkanter.org/nonprofit-ceo-leaders/ How will social improve things they know already and value?
  • 30. Networking
  • 31. Keep Up With Your Field
  • 32. Influencer Engagement
  • 33. It’s Making the Time, Not Finding It
  • 34. Jim’s Advice …
  • 35. Social Media Policy – All Staff and Board Participate http://www.bethkanter.org/staff-guidelines/
  • 36. Champions: Employees, Board Members
  • 37. Share Pair • How can social media be in service of your goals of becoming a change maker? • How can social media power your philanthropy? • How can you balance the personal/professional with the organizational?
  • 38. A Quick Network Primer What: Social networks are collections of people and organizations who are connected to each other in different ways through common interests or affiliations. A network map visualize these connections. Online and offline. Why: If we understand the basic building blocks of social networks, and visually map them, we can leverage them for our work and organizations can leverage them for their campaigns. We bring in new people and resources and save time.
  • 39. A Quick Primer on Social Network Analysis Periphery Cluster Core Hubs or Influencers Ties Node
  • 40. Low Tech
  • 41. Movements
  • 42. Stakeholder Map INFORMAL RELATIONSHIPS OTHER ORGANIZATIONS • Other Constituents • Other Constituents • Other Constituents • Other Constituents • Other Constituents • Other Constituents Target Audiences • Describe • Describe • Describe • Describe STAFF and BOARD • Aligned Partners PARTNERS • Aligned Partners • Aligned Partners FORMAL RELATIONSHIPS
  • 43. Stakeholder Maps
  • 44. Network Map of Twitter Hashtag: WEF 2030
  • 45. LinkedIn InMaps: Fill Structural Holes InMap (http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com/) Source: Meg Garlinghouse, LinkedIn
  • 46. Network Weaving and Social Capital Bridges and Islands Small talk creates trust trust lubricates transactions, pay it forward and connecting
  • 47. Create Your Map 1. Use sticky notes, markers and poster paper to create your network map. 2. Think about goals and brainstorm a list of “go to” people, organizations, and online resources 3. Decide on different colors to distinguish between different groups, write the names on the sticky notes 4. Identify influencers, specific ties and connections. Draw the connections 5. Alternative exercises on wiki
  • 48. BREAK!
  • 49. Walk About, View Other Maps, Leave Notes Visualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to help support your organizational or change maker goals. What insights did you learn from mapping your network? What did you learn from looking at other network maps?
  • 50. Speed Debrief: 90 Seconds
  • 51. Twitter Best Practices and Practicing for Change Makers
  • 52. Twitter Tweet Cheat
  • 53. Living Case Study: @GreenforGreens • How and why are you using Twitter? • How do you use it as a Change Maker? • Share a success story – big or small • What is your advice about getting started and being an effective networker on Twitter?
  • 54. Your Twitter Profile is Your Elevator Speech
  • 55. Twitter Best Practices and Practicing – Profile Five Minute Exercise: 1. 2. 3. 4. Craft Your Twitter Elevator Speech Who are you? Why should someone want to connect with you? What makes you unique? What is the change you want to see in the world?
  • 56. Twitter Literacy: 10 Minutes 3x A Day Search Engage Twitter Scan Office Minutes Office Minutes Twitter Tweet “Successful use of Twitter means knowing how to tune the network of people you follow, and how to feed the network of people who follow you.” Howard Rheingold
  • 57. Tuning: Use Lists and Follow Wisely Using lists helps you stay organized as you keep an eye on various groups of people or organizations.
  • 58. Feeding: Engagement Techniques and Tools • • • • • • • • Find and engage with influencers that care Honestly follow interesting people Tweet relevant valuable information and links Network weave Be helpful Say thanks Give shout outs, RT, Ask Questions Hashtags conversations and chats
  • 59. Feeding: Write Great Tweets Omit Needless Words Describe, Simplify, Avoid One thought per Tweet Baby Shoes for Sale. Never Worn.
  • 60. How To Tweet Like Hemmingway
  • 61. Leave Room for Re-tweets: 120 Characters
  • 62. Use Apps Tweet on the Go! Document real-time happenings Stay on top of breaking news & interactions Use scheduling apps with caution
  • 63. Twitter Best Practices and Practicing Already Tweeting • Review wiki page and resources and tweet your questions about practice with the #netnon hashtag Need to get on Twitter? • Sign up for a Twitter account, find people to follow, and set up your profile https://support.twitter.com/groups/50-welcome-to-twitter/topics/204-the-basics/articles/100990-signing-up-with-twitter
  • 64. Mindful Social Media or Mind Full? Photo by pruzicka
  • 65. Managing Your Attention Online: Why Is It An Important Networking Skill?
  • 66. Self-Knowledge Is The First Step 1. When you open email or do social media tasks, does it make you feel anxious? 2. When you are seeking information to curate, have you ever forgotten what it was in the first place you wanted to accomplish? 3. Do you ever wish electronic information would just go away? 4. Do you experience frustration at the amount of electronic information you need to process daily? 5. Do you sit at your computer for longer than 30 minutes at a time without getting up to take a break? 6. Do you constantly check (even in the bathroom on your mobile phone) your email, Twitter or other online service? 7. Is the only time you're off line is when you are sleeping? 8. Do you feel that you often cannot concentrate? 9. Do you get anxious if you are offline for more than a few hours? 10.Do you find yourself easily distracted by online resources that allow you to avoid other, pending work? A few quick assessment questions Add up your score: # of YES answers
  • 67. What’s Your Attention Focusing Score? Source: Lulumonathletica 0…1…2…3…4…5…6…7…8…9…10 Mindful Online………………………………………………………..Need Help Now
  • 68. What does it mean to manage your attention while your curate or other social media tasks? • Understand your goals and priorities and ask yourself at regular intervals whether your current activity serves your higher priority. • Notice when your attention has wandered, and then gently bringing it back to focus on your highest priority • Sometimes in order to learn or deepen relationships -- exploring from link to link is permissible – and important. Don’t make attention training so rigid that it destroys flow. Source: Howard Rheingold NetSmart
  • 69. Takeaways: Share Pairs • What’s one tip or technique that you can put into practice about networked mindsets, networking with Twitter, or mindfulness • Write on an index card with your name and enter raffle for a book
  • 70. Closing Circle and Reflection
  • 71. Thank you! www.bethkanter.org www.facebook.com/beth.kanter.blog @kanter on Twitter