Networked NGO - Day 1

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  • Official Welcome (10 minutes)Participants introduce themselves by name, title, and organizationStrategy or tactics? 
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Official Welcome (10 minutes) Program Overview: Orient participants to the four days and overall program, including expectations (10 minutes)  Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • Skype out to a conference callWebinar platform for slides
  • Exercise (25 minutes)Facilitator asks the group to form 4 groups of 4 people each – social media implementers in two groups, and senior leaders in two groups. Each group will meet over the next 10 minutes. Their task is to reflect together on the following question: What are your hopes for this program and any fears or concerns you have for it as well? After the discussion period, each group will have 3 minutes to share their group's hopes and fears. At the conclusion, facilitator asks the group for their comments, observations and reflections on the whole to debrief.
  • From Me To We: Creating A Social Network Based On Our Individual KnowledgeConcept: Networked Nonprofits under networks. Networks are collections of people and organizations who are connected to each other in different ways through common interests or affiliations. Social networks have different patterns and structures to them and the glue that holds networks together and makes them effective is relationships If NGOs understand and apply the basic building blocks of social networks, their social media campaigns and activities will get more impactful results. Three Things About Me: This is the icebreaker allows individuals to introduce themselves and share something about their experience, expertise, or knowledge related to the project. By the end, we will have created a social network on the wall that allows us to visualize our shared points of connection and reciprocity. The trainers will document the activity to post to project wiki.  Preparation Step: Tape poster sheets to the wall and label with “Three Things About Me Network.”Hand out the sticky notes to participants. Give a different color sticky note to senior leaders and a different color for social media implementer’s. Ask each person to write down one word or phrase on a sticky note that describes their knowledge, skill, expertise, or something important that they’d like to group to know about them. Participants should share three sticky notes per person. Participants should include their name and Twitter ID (if they have one) on the sticky note. Have each participant stand in front of the group and introduce share their “Three Things About Me” and put the sticky notes on the poster sheet.Co-Trainer will type in words and phrases and create a WordleDebrief: As a group, reflect on these questions and summarize connections/reciprocity poster paper:What points of connection (common interests) did you hear or see?What opportunities for reciprocity?We have a created a social network and found connections based on our mutual interests. This is one of the key benefits of social media, especially for NGOs. Tools like Twitter and Facebook allow NGOs to easily connect with people and other organizations based on mutual interest. How might we leverage this network for the benefit of the project and your NGOs work?
  • Reflection What points of connection or common interests did you hear or see? What opportunities for reciprocity? How can we mutually support one another in our social media learning journey?
  • Credit InnonetImageSource: Wikipedia/Map of Six Degrees Theory of Social Connectivityhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Six_degrees_of_separation.pngText: Chapter 2: Understanding Networks – The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine
  • The Networked NGO: How Does It Translate? Introducing Networked NGOWhat is a Networked NGO?Examples of Networked NGOsExercise 
  • The transition from working like this to this – doesn’t happen over night, can’t flip a switch
  • sinfsurat + creativeangerbyrakshi are both initiative of RakhshindaPerveen that aim to empower women.
  • creativeanger by rakhshi is a social enterprise.It is committed to courage for intellectual risks and functions as a consultancy firm & civic advocacy organization. sinfsurat (faces of gender) is a think channel to promote dialogue on the neglected faces of gender inequity in policies, society and strategies ( development & disaster).
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words.Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • -----------If you are on a good Internet connection, clicking the link will take you to the YouTube Video, but make sure you play it before you present so you don’t have to wait for it.Another option is to embed the video in the slide, but you must have an Internet connection – Instructionshttp://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2010/03/embedding-a-youtube-video-in-power-point.html)No Internet connection?You can download YouTube Videos and play them offline using one of these programs:http://keepvid.com/FireFoxPlugin: http://www.web-video-downloader.com/Bear in mind, that KeepVid uses a Java applet that you have to allow to run, there's a possibility it doesn't work well in some browsers but on Chrome it's fine.  You can save the file in mp4 (and link to it from your ppt) or save as a .flv and open it in your browser (as long as you have the right plugin/player - on my computer I'm using Real Player and QuickTime. I put a link “Play Video Offline” and link to the video file on the hard drive in the same folder as the ppt. Then you click it and it will ask you confirm the player and it will play.  Story of Electronics, an environmental-themed short film, as a case study and jumping off point for a workshop exercise to create a digital campaign. The Story of Electronics is part of a series of short films created and released by the Story of Stuff project since 2007.  The first film, The Story of Stuff, shows the devastating consequences of our (American) consumerism in the environment, developing countries, personal health and happiness.     The Story of Stuff site was created to leverage and extend the film’s impact by creating a network of people who are discussing the issue and hope to build a more sustainable and just world.   Their online network includes over 250,000 activists and they partner with hundreds of environmental and social justice organizations around the world to create and distribute the film, curricula, and other content.Last week at the TechSoup Global Summit, I had an opportunity to meet Annie Leonard and do a quick interview about their lessons learned working as a networked.  As I listened to her speak about their experience,   I knew this would be a terrific case study to share in Beirut as an example of working in a networked way.    Annie was kind enough to give me her notes so I could write this case study and hopefully, I’ve captured it correctly.The first thing to point out is that Story of Stuff project is not an independent nonprofit (as far as I could tell) and is fiscally-sponsored by the Tides Center.  This organization is one that was born as networked nonprofit, in part, because of the experience and vision of its leader, Annie Leonard.Here’s some basic points she made about working effectively in a networked way compared to working in a traditional organization.Source: Leadership for a New EraTo Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset and Networking ToolsA Networked organization is more than just the electronic infrastructure and tools that facilitate communication.   It isn’t a matter of a Facebook profile or using Twitter.   It is a collaborative way of working.   It is about  sharing.   When you have a group of people working together in a network-culture and are facile with the tools, it can be unstoppable.She described the networked mindset as different from working in a conventional nonprofit institution.      These conventional nonprofits, what we label “Fortresses” in our book, The Networked Nonprofit,  are all about command and top down control.   Annie pointed out that these organizations have many rigid rules.   It means that no one on staff or the outside can do anything without permission and had to be done a prescribed way.  For example, everyone had to use the same font.What’s more she described how difficult this way of working is and makes it almost impossible to collaborate with other organizations working on similar issues.     In traditional organizations,  they approach activism as   “It is our issue.”   These traditional organizations feel that power comes for their expertise and their institution.In Networks, Information and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsAnnie talked about how networks focus on collaboration and action, rather than institution building.   She noted,  “In networks, the goal isn’t a big staff, but inspiring lots of people to do the good work through making connections and taking action.”    She also observed that in networks, power and decision-making propagates outwards – rather than being consolidated in the center.How and Why The Story of Stuff  Is Successful As A NetworkAnnie credits the above ways of working as the secret to their success.    She made the film because she was frustrated that the mainstream media and culture had ignored the underside of the American consumer economy.     When she posted the short film online in 2007, it exploded.   It turned up the volume on this important conversation.In the three years since the film has been out there, there are still 10K views a day and 12 million views online.  There are more than 220 countries have viewed the film in an unknown number of group settings.  It’s been translated into dozens of languages, inspired curriculum for high school, inspired a ballet in Boston, a puppet show in Palestine, floats in parades and the list goes on.  People have spray painted the URL on bus stops.Building RelationshipsAnnie suggests that one reason they were successful is that the film wasn’t just hers.  It was conceived and created in a network context.      Instead of doing everything herself, she engaged other people.   She spent an entire decade building relationships with groups all over the world and building a network of organizations to address the issues in the film.  She also got lots of feedback about the film while it was being created.When the film launched, it was already on the web site of hundreds of groups all over the world.    Hundreds of advocates and allies helped create it and had a stake in it.     She says it was “network-held” resource.Inspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free ZoneAnnie also mentioned that their focus was to inspire new thinking and conversations, rather than getting credit or making money.    They used a creative commons license – allowing anyone to use their films, put them on their sites, and do anything they wanted except sell it.While Annie isn’t suggesting that we bury the old-school, centralized,  command and control model of organizing, she feels that different times demand evolving models.       Annie says working as network offers these advantages:(1)  Networks are more resilient and flexible and can bigger risks because they don’t have to worry about the longevity of a big institution.(2)  Networks are participatory.  They can get millions of people to help, not just paid staff.(3)  Networks offer many different ways to get involved.   It’s a buffet of ways to engage people that fits them.   Networks value people on whatever terms they want to participate.(4)  Networks are a reflection of where the world is going.    There’s a big paradigm shift in everything from our relationship to material goods to organizational models.   We’re moving from a “mine” to “ours” environment.(5) Networks make us all smarter.   By sharing information freely and welcoming input and feedback, learning is accelerated.    Networks evolve faster because of this.(6)  Networks are more fun.     Annie said that she had spent many years trying to get people to talk about the issues that she cared about, thinking her experience and expertise were enough.   It wasn’t until she learned to let go of control and shift from lecturing people to inviting them in that conversation exploded.As Annie said in her closing remarks,   the Story of Stuff is about building a better world.    In the story, the network is the hero.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nep/2284817865/Human SpectrogramThis is a group face to face exercise to help surface similarities and differences in a group, help people to get to know each other and to do something together that is active. The Networked NGO concept is relevant to NGOs in my country (agree/disagree)My NGO is in the process of transforming into a Networked NGO (agree/disagree)Becoming a Networked NGO can help us achieve great impact (agree/disagree)Morning Break after this … 
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • Networked NGOs in PakistanPick one of the case studies that illustrates organizational change and succes:KuchKhaas is a community space for interaction, public discourse, cultural and intellectual pursuits, and civic engagement. Their Facebook page was spammed heavily at the beginning of having a Facebook Page. They blocked others from posting and failed at engaging. By simply posting rules and actively enforcing them, the spam stopped. They are now using social media heavily. Especially YouTubeExercise:
  • Networked Nonprofits have a social culture. They use social media to engage people inside and outside the organization to improve programs, services, or reach communications goals. Before this can happen, they need leadership buy-in, address concerns head on, and codify the organizational rules around using social media. Reverse mentoringBarrier: Organizational ConcernsLoss of control over their branding and marketing messagesDealing with negative commentsAddressing personality versus organizational voicePrivacy and securityPerception of wasted of time and resources
  • Kushti/Pehlwani is a martial art that is popular in Pakistan, India & Bangladesh. This is in Lahore, Pakistan in 2010. photo: Ed KashiExercise: Share Pair: Look over the list of concerns; identify which ones you think may be relevant for NGO? What are they? Are there other concerns that might arise?
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • Will hand out worksheets
  • http://www.flickr.com/photohttp://www.slideshare.net/jeremiah_owyang/career-social-strategist?from=embeds/jeremiah_owyang/5162385707/The culture of acompany directly influences how they develop their organizational formation. Weidentified five models for how companies organize for social media, and asked SocialStrategists how they’re currently formed. Nearly 60% of surveyed Social Strategistsclassified their organizational model as “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke”(also known as “Dandelion”), in which a central hub provides guidance, resources andcoordination to business units (See Figure 5). We found that 82% of those in theseorganizational models had reached sophistication, self-identifying their programs asFormalized, Mature, or Advanced. Expect more companies to model in either “Hub andSpoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke,” as these formations are best equipped to scale tomeet demands from both internal and external stakeholders4
  • SimplicityA big concern that often comes up is “We don’t have the time to do social media.” Part of the problem is that many organizations do too much and don’t let go of tasks or programs that aren’t working. Simplicity clarifies health organizations and forces them to focus their energy on what they do best, while leveraging their networks for the rest. It is important to discuss and identify find ways that social media use is not an add-on, but can be incorporate into existing work flow. Finally, social media does take time and it is important to figure who will do the work.Share Pair: What could your organization do less of to make time for social media?
  • Content: Mistakes are our best teachers. With social media, learning from failure is a best practice.Lessons Learned from A Big Social Media Mistake by Red Crosshttp://www.bethkanter.org/mistakes-how2/Joyful Funerals: This is a term I first heard from MomsRising about how they give themselves permission to fail and stop doing something that doesn’t work with social media.  And, that through this comes learning and insight.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Vo4M4u5Boc&feature=player_embeddedShare Pair: What is the worst thing that could possibly go wrong with social media? How can you minimize the impact?
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/ruminatrix/2734602916/sizes/o/in/photostream/Funerals in Ghana are an event - up there with weddings in terms of planning, cost, and level of celebration. They can take months, even up to a year, to plan and save for. Obituaries are made into color posters and put up around town. There is music, drumming, dancing and singing as they parade through town. These processions, which occur on Friday afternoons, kick off the 3-day affairs.Momsrising also understands that learning leads to success.Fail: Some experiments bomb.    Momrising staff gives themselves permission to kill each other’s projects  or tactical ideas that were brilliant at the time but simply don’t work.  They do this with humor to remove the failure stigma and call it a “Joyful Funeral”  Before they bury the body, they reflect on why it didn’t work. Any staff person can call a Joyful Funeral on anyone else’s idea.Incremental Success Is Not A Failure: They do a lot of experiments and set realistic expectations for success.   Many times victories happen in baby steps.   They know from experience that many of their campaigns that incorporate social media lead to incremental successes, small wins or small improvements.Soaring Success:     Some experiments, actions, or issues will see dramatic results – beyond the organization’s wildest dreams.   For example, an interactive educational video ended up garnering over 12 million views and hundreds of comments and lead to thousands of new members signing up or taking action. Kristen says, “That type of success does not happen every day, but we need to try for that kind of success every day. We can only do it if we kill things that don’t work.”  They also analyze game changing successes to make sure it can be replicated or wasn’t an accident
  • Content: Mistakes are our best teachers. With social media, learning from failure is a best practice.Lessons Learned from A Big Social Media Mistake by Red Crosshttp://www.bethkanter.org/mistakes-how2/Joyful Funerals: This is a term I first heard from MomsRising about how they give themselves permission to fail and stop doing something that doesn’t work with social media.  And, that through this comes learning and insight.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Vo4M4u5Boc&feature=player_embeddedShare Pair: What is the worst thing that could possibly go wrong with social media? How can you minimize the impact?
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlelakes/54251489/
  • Song/vid: http://youtu.be/ZdpaFIpCoLA
  • Transparency and Learning in PublicFor a nonprofit to be transparent means that it is open, accountable, and honest with its stakeholders and the public. Transparency exists to a lesser or greater extent in all organizations. Greater transparency is a good thing, not just because it is morally correct, but because it can provide measurable benefits. "Disclosure" is a component of transparency, and means releasing the information you have to and want to. "Transparency," on the other hand, can often mean releasing information that you don't have to. When organizations work in a transparent way, they consider staff, board, and the people in their networks as resources for helping them to achieve their goals. This is not about being transparent for transparency sake; working transparently is an opportunity to improve the results of organizations’ programs. Transparent and open organizations are clear about what they do, and they know what they are trying to accomplish. They are enriched by outside feedback.Substantial – The organization provides information that is truthful, complete, easy to understand, and reliable. Accountable – The organization is forthcoming with bad news, admits mistakes, and provides both sides of a controversy. Absence of secrecy – The organization doesn’t leave out important but potentially damaging details, the organization doesn’t obfuscate its data with jargon or confusion, and the organization is slow to provide data or only discloses data when required.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/444790702/Fortresses work hard to keep their communities and constituents at a distance, pushing out messages and dictating strategy rather than listening or building relationships. Fortress organizations are losing ground today because they spend an extraordinary amount of energy fearing what might happen if they open themselves up to the world. These organizations are floundering in this set-me-free world powered by social media and free agents.This trajectory changes when organizations learn to use social media and actually become their own social networks. The opposite of Fortresses, transparents can be considered as glass houses, with the organizations presumably sitting behind glass walls. However, this isn’t really transparency because a wall still exists. True transparency happens when the walls are taken down, when the distinction between inside and outside becomes blurred, and when people are let in and staffers are let out.University of California Museum of Paleontology, “Introduction to Porifera,” http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/porifera/porifera.html (accessed on May 21, 2009). Opening the Kimono in Beth’s Blog: A Day in the Life of Nonprofit Social Media Strategists and Transparency,” Beth’s Blog, posted August 3, 2009, http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/08/opening-the-kimino-week-on-beths-blog-a-day-in-the-life-of-nonprofit-social-media-strategists-and-tr.html (accessed September 30, 2009). 
  • Lesson & questionnaire, then reflectionThese four components of transparency are tested by the following questionnaire Participation – The organization asks for feedback, involves others, takes the time to listen, and is prompt in responding to requests for information.It is this participation where public learning takes place ….Reflection: What are the benefits and challenges of embracing transparency in your local context?
  • Group leaders with leadersSocial media implementors
  • Network Primer Presentation: Networks are more than random gatherings of people and organizations online. Social networks have specific structures and patterns to them. In order to engage them well, NGOS need to understand the fundamental building blocks of social networks. Shifting focus from organizational to engaging with social networks that exist is the first step. The networks are filled with people who want to help with a cause. NGOs that build social capital and weave their networks can achieve more impactful results.   Social Capital Social capital makes relationships meaningful and resilient. Trust and reciprocity. Social media can help build social capital because:Social networks make it easy to find people online Serendipity is enhanced by social networking sites where people connect based on their interests or friendsReciprocity is easy Network WeavingA term coined by Valdis Krebs and June Holley. Describes a set of skills that help strengthen and build social networks. Some activities include:Introducing/connecting people to one another:Facilitating conversations, Building relationships w/Network membersSharing resources, links, information, contactsYou can also leverage the power of networks and social media for professional learning. You can connect with peers and even people you don’t know personally who have subject matter expertise.
  • Image from Working Wikily
  • Social network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
  • Social network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
  • http://www.dailyseoblog.com/2009/06/9-tools-to-measure-your-twitter-influence-reach/
  • Social capital that make relationships meaningful and resilient. Trust and reciprocity. Social media can help build social capital because:Social networks make it easy to find people online Serendipity is enhanced by social networking sites where people connect based on their interests or friendsReciprocity is easy
  • Here is an example using online tool for network weaving. We hope to do a lot of network weaving with our online community site. If you’re going to use Day 3 to get people set up with Facebook or Twitter, this might be a good way for you to communicate between sessions.
  • Mapping Your Network ExerciseGoal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each individual to use a low-tech method (sticky notes and poster paper) to map their NGO’s network. Staff at NGOs don’t all need to become experts everything in social media. They can use an understanding of networks to develop and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with.  Description: Organizations will work together. They will use sticky notes to create network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights.  Some reflection questions to generate insights once maps are createdWhat people, resources, and organizations are in your ecosystem?What are the different roles?Are you connected or not connected?If connected, how are you connected?Think about the touch points in your network? How do you appreciate, thank, and celebrate important people in your network?Think about reciprocity: What have you given people in your network before they have asked? Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to each map and have each team debrief their map. Walk to the next map as a group. Once every team has reported, then ask everyone to sit down and reflect on these questions:How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • M Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to each map and have each team debrief their map. Walk to the next map as a group. Once every team has reported, then ask everyone to sit down and reflect on these questions:How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • Twitter can be an excellent tool for network weaving and professional learning about any topic, but especially social media. The tools make it easy to get “just in time support,” network, connect with different people who have different expertise.  Presentation – 1-2-3 get on Twitter (15 minutes) Have each participant set up a Twitter personal accountUpload photo/fill out profileUnderstand the basic vocabulary of Twitter (@, DM, #hashtags)Tweeting 101Set up lists of everyone’s ID Enlist the help of the social media people – they would work in pairs by organization #netnonpk – first tweet – project Work in small groups, with social media pairing with leaders. (30 minutes) Up a Rowfeeder in the backgroundAsk people to tweet with the hashtag – their reflection about using TwitterTweet the answer to this: How could Twitter be useful in network weaving and connecting for this group as you learn social media?
  • Nearly everyone in Pakistan knows the character Gogi which is why I’m suggesting her as having a role in the ppt. She stands for women’s empowerment & social responsibility!
  • Networked NGO - Day 1

    1. Becoming A Networked NGO Using Social Media Effectively Day One: Introducing the Networked NonprofitApril 16-19, 2012Dubai
    2. Day One: Welcome from Packard Foundation
    3. Day One: Introducing the Networked Nonprofit AGENDA OUTCOMESWelcome Understand programOrientation/ Icebreaker expectationsThe Networked NGO: How Understand how to applyDoes It Translate? the Networked NGO conceptNetworked NGOs in Map your online/offlinePakistan and Beyond networksChange from the Inside Out FRAMINGMapping and Weaving YourNetwork Balance of peer learning & expert sharingPracticum InteractiveReflection Fun! Don’t Be Shy! Laptops up/Laptops Down
    4. Logistics• Materials – Print/USB• Online: http://networked- ngo.wikispaces.com• Wifi – Hashtag #netnonpk• Restrooms• Breaks• Other
    5. Day One: Trainer Introduction – Beth Kanter
    6. Day One: Trainer Introduction – Stephanie Rudat
    7. Day One: Program Orientation Goals• To understand the basic steps and frameworks for integrating social media to further their communications work in population and reproductive health that aligned with institutional goals• To learn practical tips and best practices for using one or two relevant social media platforms or tools to support strategy• To create an opportunity for peer support and learning on social media best practices for NGOs doing work in population and reproductive health aligned with institutional goals.
    8. Day One: Program Orientation What does success look like?• NGOs research and write a formal social media strategy that links social media outcomes to institutional goals around population and reproductive health.• NGOs discuss and write a formal social media policy for their institutions use of social media.• NGOs are able to design and implement a small action-learning project on Facebook or other appropriate social channel that helps them implement a small social media pilot, measure it, and reflect on learning with peers.
    9. Day One: Theory of Change Grantees communicationsstrategies have moreimpact on policy and social change outcomes Grantees have better relationships with influencers , partners, and stakeholders Grantees amplify each others social media activities with better results Grantees get better at social media integration strategy and measurement and learning discipline Grantees implement action learning pilots and share learning with each other
    10. Day One: Introducing the Networked Nonprofit Participant Assessment Curriculum Development Training Delivery In-Country: April, 2012 Action Learning Projects Monthly Conference Calls: May – December,20122
    11. Day One: Introducing the Networked NonprofitDay Content1 Introducing the Networked NGO • Program Overview • Networked NGO: Definition and Examples • Network Mapping and Weaving with Social Media • Working As A Networked NGO • Reflection Senior Leaders2 Social Media Strategy Development • Social Media Overview • Principles of Effective Social Media Practice • Creating your Social Media Strategy • Strategic online presence • Integrated Content Strategy Social Media3 Social Media Tools and Practicum • Listening and content discover Implementors • Twitter • Facebook • Blogging4 Designing an Action Learning Project Using the Wiki • Design your learning project • How to Use Wiki, Facebook Group, Conference Platform • Reflection
    12. Post Workshop Support – May to NovemberCall Topic1 Content (10 minutes, nuts/bolts) Peer Share: Objectives/Internal Issues Next Action Steps2 Content (10 minutes, nuts/bolts) Peer Share: Engagement Tactics Next Action Steps3 Content (10 minutes, nuts/bolts) Facebook Peer Share: Content Tactics Next Action Steps4 Content (10 minutes, nuts/bolts) Peer Share: Measurement Techniques Next Action Steps5 Content (10 minutes, nuts/bolts) Peer Share: Learning Culmination Learning Culmination
    13. Action Learning Projects Check In Facebook Next Topic Action Other DiscussionSkype out to a conference callWebinar platform for slides
    14. Day One: Program Hopes and Fears• Series of Share Pairs • Pair #1: Work with person from your NGO • Pair #2: Social Media implementers pair up, Strategy staff pair up• Reflect on: • What is your greatest hope for this program? What do you see as success? • What are your concerns?• Report Out
    15. Greatest Value Using Social Media Can Bring to Your Organization4.5 43.5 32.5 21.5 10.5 0 Network & Collecting Stakeholder Disseminating Integrate with Relationship Feedback Involvement Information Existing Brick-and- Building (including Best Mortar Grassroots Practices) Programs
    16. Design Should Emphasize Culture Change and Practical Skills Skills No Knowledge Challenges OtherSkepticismabout value Lack of Time
    17. A successful workshop on social media would include• How to increase participation/networking• How to create and increase engagement of target audience• How to use social media to align our organization’s objectives• How to reach youth to discuss important issues• How to measure impact and value of social media in order to scale it up and/or invest in it as a significant feature of the larger communication plan• How to optimize SEO using social media• How to use it as an effective medium of communication within the organization and the global partnership• How to network within the NGO community
    18. Day One: From Me To WeCreating A Social Network Based on Our Individual Knowledge
    19. Day One: From Me To We DirectionsInstructions1. Share 3 things about you that are important for others to know for this project (skills, knowledge, interests)2. Write one word per sticky note3. Include your name and organization4. Place your sticky note on the wall
    20. Reflection
    21. Day One: The Power of Networks We have now created a social network around our shared interests. This is what happens when we use online social networks like Facebook. The glue that holds them together is relationships: connections and reciprocity. If NGOs understand the basic building blocks of social networks and apply to their work, they can achieve better resultsImage Source: Innonet
    22. Day One: The Networked NGO How Does It Translate?
    23. Definition: Networked NonprofitsNetworked Nonprofits are simple, agile, and transparent NGOs. They are experts at using social media tools to make the world a better place. Networked Nonprofits first must “be” before they can “do.”For some NGOS, it means changing the way they work. Others naturally work in a networked way so change isn’t as difficult.
    24. NGO: Not Networked NGO Modified illustration by David Armano The Micro-Sociology of NetworksWith apologies to David Armano for hacking his visual!Source: The Micro-Sociology of Networks
    25. Networked Ngo NGO StaffWith apologies to David Armano for hacking his visual!Source: The Micro-Sociology of Networks
    26. In the three years since the film has been out there,there are still 10K views a day and 12 million viewsonline.People in 220 countries have viewed the film in anunknown number of group settings.Translated into dozens of languages, inspiredcurriculum for high school, inspired a ballet inBoston, a puppet show in Palestine.
    27. To Be Successful You Need both A Network Mindset andNetworking ToolsInformation and Connections Flow in Many DirectionsBuilding RelationshipsInspiring Others To Take Action: Credit Free Zone
    28. Agree I like some wonderful Peshwari Naan with Coconut Disagree How comfortable are you personally using social media? (very/not at all) Online social networks can help us achieve results that support our social change goals (agree/disagree) The Networked Nonprofit concept is relevant to our NGO’s work (agree/disagree)Human Spectragram
    29. BREAK!15 minutes to enjoy coffee, tea & snacks
    30. Day One: Networked NGOs in Pakistan Exercise1. Work in pairs.2. Think of of an NGO in your country that is or is becoming a Networked Nonprofit? What is it about the way they work?3. Write their name on a sticky note with some words that describe the way they work.
    31. Day One: Networked NGOs in Pakistan Full Group DebriefQuestions:• How does the concept translate?• Can you think of an example of Networked NGO in Pakistan?• How would you introduce this concept to others in your NGO?
    32. Day One: Networked NGOs in Pakistan Kuch Khaas
    33. Not all NGOs are born as Networked NGOs or can easily transform. Some take a longer time…
    34. Day One: Becoming A Networked Nonprofit Change from the Inside Out BE DOUnderstand Networks Work with Free AgentsCreate Social Culture Work with CrowdsListen, Engage, and Build Learning LoopsRelationshipsTrust Through Transparency Friending or FundingSimplicity Govern through Networks
    35. Day One: Becoming A Networked Nonprofit Definition: Social CultureMany people in the NGO use social media to engage people inside and outside the organization to improve programs, services, or reach communications goals. Barrier:Organizational Concerns
    36. Day One: Becoming A Networked Nonprofit Share Pair: Concerns Loss of control over your branding & marketing messages Dealing with negative comments Addressing personality versus organizational voice Make mistakes Perception of wasted of time and resources Safety and security concerns
    37. Day One: Becoming A Networked Nonprofit Share Pair: ConcernsQuestions:• Review the list of concerns and identify which ones you think may be relevant for your NGO• What are they?• Are there other concerns that might arise?
    38. Social Culture: Step 1 – Talk About the Issues
    39. Step 2: Write Down the Rules – Social Media Policy • Encouragement and support • Best practices • Tone • Why policy is needed • Expertise • Cases when it will be used, • Respect distributed • Quality • Oversight, notifications, and legal implications • Additional resources • Training • Guidelines • Press referrals • Identity and transparency • Escalation • Responsibility • Confidentiality • Policy examples available at • Judgment and common wiki.altimetergroup.com sense Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group
    40. Most Participants Do Not Have A Social Media Policy No Yes
    41. http://www.bethkanter.org/trust-control/
    42. Discussion: Debrief How would you lead a discussion within your organization about the concerns?If you had a basic template for a social media policy, how would you ensure that it is discussed and adapted for your organization?
    43. Day One: Becoming A Networked Nonprofit Simplicity Simplicity clarifies organizations and helpsthem focus their energy on what they do best, while leveraging the resources of their networks for the rest.It is important to make sure that social media isn’t just one more thing to do.
    44. Simplicity in Social Media PracticeFocus on what you do best, network the restLeverage your networks
    45. You want me to startTweeting too?
    46. Leverage Your Networks Social Culture
    47. Leverage Your Networks Social Culture
    48. Who will do the work?Free Integrated Staff• Intern • Tasks in Job • Full-Time• Volunteer • Part-Time• Board Members• Fans
    49. Wendy Harman Director, Social Media Create ROI Measurements Develop Internal Education and Training Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan Get Buy-In from Stakeholders Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy Gets Tools and Technologies in place Facilitate policy and procedures Community managerTwo Full-Time Staff Members
    50. Department Structure
    51. Day One: Change from the Inside Out Simplicity: Share PairWhat could your organization do less of to make time for social media?
    52. Day One: Change from the Inside Out Mistakes As Teachers
    53. Momsrising: Joyful Funerals…. 1. Fail 2. Incremental Success 3. Dramatic Success
    54. Why did it fail?What did we learn?What insights canuse next timearound? DoSomething.Org’s Fail Fest
    55. This “MisTweet” by a Red Cross employee wasout for an hour before Wendy Harman got a call in the middle of the night.
    56. Disaster recovery on the tweet
    57. Apologized and shared on their blog
    58. Employee confessed on Twitter
    59. Got picked up by mainstream media and blogs
    60. What are your takeaways about social media mistakes?Admit the mistake, stakeholders are forgiving If the mistake had been damaging to the organization, a social media policy would have been critical if taking appropriate action
    61. Day One: Change from the Inside Out Mistakes As Teachers – Share Pair What is the worst thing that could possibly go wrong with social media? How can you minimize the impact?
    62. Lunch BreakEnjoy a buffet lunch over the next hour in The Promenade Flickr photo by Littlelakes
    63. Energizer
    64. Day One: Change from Inside OutTransparency is important to building networks Networked Nonprofits consider everyone inside and outside of the organization resources for helping them to achieve their goals
    65. Day One: Change from Inside OutTransparency is important to building networks
    66. Day One: Shades of Gray A Space for Private Conversations Substantial: Accountable: Forthcoming with bad Providing information that is news, admits mistakes, and truthful, complete, easy to provides both sides of a understand & reliable controversy Absence of Secrecy: Participation:Doesn’t leave out important butpotentially damaging details, the Asks for feedback, involves org doesn’t obfuscate its data others, takes the time to with jargon or confusion & the listen & is prompt in org is slow to provide data or responding to requests for only discloses data when information required
    67. Day One: Change from Inside OutTransparency is important to building networks
    68. Day One: Transparency ReflectionReflection:Is your organization a fortress or a transparent or somethingin between?What are the benefits and challenges of embracingtransparency in your local context? Jack Dorsey, Cover of Fast Company
    69. Day One: Network Primer Presentation DefinitionWhat: Social networks are collections of people andorganizations who are connected to each other in differentways through common interests or affiliations. A networkmap visualize these connections.Why: If we understand the basic building blocks of socialnetworks, and visually map them, we can leverage them forour work and NGOs can leverage them for their campaigns.We bring in new people and resources and save time.
    70. Day One: Network AnalysisCluster Periphery Core Hubs or Influencers Ties Node Source: Working Wikily
    71. How NGOs Visualize Their Networks: Activism Strategy National Wildlife Federation Brought together team that is working on advocacy strategy to support a law that encourages children to play outside. Team mapped their 5 “go to people” about this issue Look at connections and strategic value of relationships, gaps
    72. How NGOs Visualize Their Networks: Ecosystem
    73. Visualize Your Professional Online Networkhttp://blog.linkedin.com/2011/01/24/linkedin-inmaps/
    74. Visualize Your Professional Online Network Twitter Hash Tagshttp://apps.asterisq.com/mentionmap/
    75. NGOs Use Network MappingTo Strengthen Strategy: Find Hubs
    76. Strengthening Your Network Social Capital and Network WeavingSocial Capital: The benefit from building relationshipswith people in your network through trust andreciprocityNetwork Weaving: A set of skills that help build yournetwork by introducing people together, facilitatingconversations, being a bridge, and sharingresources, information, and contactsSocial media makes it easy to strengthen networksbecause it is easy to find or connect with peopleonline.
    77. Network Weaving Techniques Example
    78. Exercise: Map Your NetworkVisualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to helpsupport your program or communications goals. Who is in your network? How are you connected? Who should be in your network? In what ways do you connect with your network?
    79. Steps1. Work together in organizational pairs.2. Use sticky notes, markers and poster paper. Pick an area that you work in (family planning, women’s empowerment, maternal health, etc)3. Brainstorm a list of “go to” people, organizations, and online resources (bloggers, etc)4. Decide on different colors to distinguish between different types, write the names on the sticky notes5. Put them on the poster paper on the wall and as a group identify influencers, discuss specific ties and connections. Draw the connections.6. Reflection questions
    80. BREAK!15 minutes to enjoy coffee & tea while you Tweet!
    81. Exercise Debrief: Walk About To View MapsVisualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to helpsupport your program or communications goals. How does this idea translate? What insights did you learn from mapping your network? How can you each use your professional networks to support one another’s social media strategy work?
    82. Day One: Twitter for Network Weaving and for Professional Learning Twitter as a professional networking tool! • Twitter 101 • Profile Set up: Elevator Speech/Photo • What makes a good Tweet • Set up lists w/everyone’s ID • #netnonpk hashtag • Tweet your learnings today
    83. Day One: Introducing the Networked Nonprofit End of Day Reflection What is clear? What questions do you still have? Image by: Nigar Nazar, Gogi Studios
    84. ADJOURNED! Have a wonderful evening.We look forward to seeing you in the morning.

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