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Measuring Networked Nonprofit - Peer Learning

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  • Welcome. This is the very session for this project and I’m thrilled that you have decided to participate in this learning journey. I look forward to learning a lot from you. Today’s call is an orientation to the program and an opportunity for you to ask questions.Give my gratitude the The David and Lucile Packard Foundation for supporting this project and my work …
  • Every few minutes as we get started, tech support reminder, type into the chat, roll call
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/malinki/2621920871/sizes/o/Start recording about 2 minutes late to let people join *2
  • Welcome. This is the very session for this project and I’m thrilled that you have decided to participate in this learning journey. I look forward to learning a lot from you. Today’s call is an orientation to the program and an opportunity for you to ask questions.Give my gratitude the The David and Lucile Packard Foundation for supporting this project and my work …
  • This is our agenda – we’ll pause along the way for questions.
  • Here’s a little bit about me – blogger, author, trainer.A lot of my work lately has been designing and facilitating peer learning networks about becoming networked nonprofits and social media– the photo there is a cluster of Packard Fdn. Grantees that focus on family planning … I was in Delhi in June for the start up – an intensive boot camp, followed by remote assistance. There’s were great lunches there, so to avoid people falling asleep … I made them move. The hotel had beautiful three story staircase and they had do laps … so if you do training – incorporating movement and interaction helps people learn and we’re going to do a lot of that today!
  • Each session will include the following related to each best practice: Framework Examples Additional How To Resource Wiki will have links and resources as well as links to notes from call Hub for Journals and Over the Shoulder Learning Wiki will be updated with resources suggested or used by participants during the calls or office hours
  • The action learning projects are very critical to the success of the program .. So I will be measuring
  • Change with NGOs doesn’t happenovernight … leaders lead but you have to bring your organization along.If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
  • Framework to guide my coaching and peer learning design over the yearsThere are different stages of development for networked nonprofits. The Crawl StageCrawlers are not using social media consistently or measurement processes; they also lack a robust communications strategy. Crawlers can be small or large nonprofits that have all the basics in place, but they either lack a social culture or resist transforming from a command-and-control style to a more networked mindset. These nonprofits need to develop a strategy. Even with a communications strategy in place, some organizations may face challenges to adopting a networked way of working. If so, they should start with a discussion of the organizational issues, followed by codifying the rules in a social media policy. They should also anticipate learning and benefiting from inspiring stories from peers.The Walk StageNonprofits in this stage are using several social media channels consistently, but may not be strategic or fully embracing best practices—maybe they don’t engage with users, or they only share content and messaging produced by their own organization. These nonprofits need to create a social media strategy to support short- and long-term objectives, such policy change or increasing public engagement on an issue. Walkers internalize listening, and use the data they collect to improve engagement and some content best practices.These organizations implement small, low-risk projects that collect stories, learning, and metrics to help leadership better understand the value, benefits, and costs. Walkers should focus on one or two social media tools, going deep on tactics and generating tangible results and learning. They must identify low-cost ways to build capacity internally, such as integrating social media responsibilities into existing staff jobs. Capacity is built with support from leadership and a social media policy formalizes the value and vision.The Run StageRunners use more than two social media channels as part of an integrated strategy, identifying key result areas and metrics that drive everything they do. They have a formal ladder of engagement that illustrates how supporters move from just hearing about your organization to actively engaging, volunteering, or donating to your organization. This is used to guide strategy and measurement. They visualize their networks and measure relationships. These organizations practice basic measurement religiously and use data to make decisions about social media best practices.In these organizations, a single department does not guard social media, and staff are comfortable working transparently and with people outside the organization. The board is also using social media as part of its governance role.To build internal capacity, runners invest in a community manager whose job it is to build relationships with people on social media or emerging platforms. These organizations know how to create great content, and use an editorial calendar to coordinate and curate content across channels. They are routinely tracking the performance of their content strategy and adjust based on measurement.The Fly StageThese organizations have institutionalized everything in the running stage. Flyers embrace failure and success alike, and learn from both. Flyers are part of a vibrant network of people and organizations all focused on social change. They use sophisticated measurement techniques, tools, and processes.http://www.flickr.com/photos/oreoqueen/3235090633/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathandesign/7031920221/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/bdfbrasil/2416260064/sizes/m/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/levymh/6891554365/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/
  • I recently heard Debbie Alvarez –Rodriguez from Goodwill SF give a talk about leading with a network mindset ….She’s the CEO - and was talking about how see is often up late at night. And back a year or so ago, her org was going through layoffs ..Tough times – so she up late, checking her email ..She received an email from some employees requesting to be part of the decision-making.    She thought, “I better call my board chair because he calls me.”As they were talking, she realized, “They could have put it on Facebook.”    This could have created a public relations nightmare (It’s happened in the orchestra world when the Detroit Symphony musicians went on strike and used social media to air their concerns.    Instead, these Goodwill employees went to their CEO.This lead them to really examine how to effect culture change. As Debbie says, it wasn’t about just using the tools and platforms like Facebook and Twitter – even for herself as the CEO or her organization. That it required a shift from “pushing to engaging.”  
  • One of the things they did  early was to take an inventory of their team members’ skills to discover who was good at the various required skills writing, photography, and video as well as social media savvy.  At SF Goodwill they created a Blog Squad to kick things off.Once established, this became one of many platforms for them to engage their community and share control.
  • But, it isn’t just a spectator sport, it’s a contact sport – you have to be presence and engage ..This is the hard part … especially for CEOs of a certain age – this shift ..
  • Bruce Lesley is one of a growing number of  nonprofit executive directors and senior leaders that use Twitter.  And, he isn’t tweeting about what he ate for breakfast or one of his personal passions, basketball.   He uses Twitter to curate information related to his organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions.   He also uses content curation for sources for his guest blogging.     His use of Twitter (and his organization’s use of Twitter and all communications channels for that matter) serve this intent:First Focus is working to change the dialogue around children’s issues by taking a cross-cutting and broad based approach to federal policy making. In all of our work, we seek to raise awareness regarding public policies impacting children and ensure that related programs have the resources necessary to help them grow up in a healthy and nurturing environment.If you take a look at Bruce Lesley’s Twitter stream, you will see that he is curating information on public policies impacting children.   Bruce does his own curating, using Google Reader and FlipBoard.   Any individual or nonprofit organization can curate information using these tools.  They can make it strategic by linking the information to their mission.   But what is the secret sauce to doing it well?
  • Note: This is not only the big outcomes, but also the evidence of peer learning work. ]You all have been doing amazing work since we last got together and your growing skills and networks really paid off recently with regard to the Supreme Court’s decision on the ACA. In her blog, Beth highlighted this day as one of those opportunities to balance strategic communications with the spontaneity of social media. You all jumped on this historic event and demonstrated your social media smarts, including:Being flexible and keeping it simple;Using multiple channels and shaping content for each channel;Leveraging the organic sharing properties of Facebook;Having a broad narrative in mind in advance (win, lose or something in between);Getting your social media ambassadors and “super-users” to help spread your message;Curating content from trusted sources; andFocusing on the story after the immediate announcement and providing analysis.There was a huge amount of activity across our network on decision day and it really was a great demonstration of putting into action what we have been learning as a peer community.
  • Structural hole is a space between clusters or nodes in your networkBy connecting these clusters or for individuals “closing triangles” you are the brokerThis create more opportunity for new ideas, innovation, scaling, and linking your network to your social media strategy gives the potential for more impact..
  • Resources Legacy FundThere are extensive networks that exist around the issues we work on and the organizations with whom we work. Having a clear understanding of these networks is important to efficient communication and to developing and maintaining relationships with key individuals and organizations that influence the conservation outcomes we care about.Practice: How have they gotten an understanding?Community Foundation for Monterey CountyCenter for Nonprofit Excellence facilitates nonprofit capacity builders network meeting, holds space for ED monthly meetings and board presidents' group brown bag peer learning Girls Health in Girls Hands (grantmaking) and coordination of 6-agency collaborative Staff participation in several networks, i.e. youth collaborative, building healthy communitiesPractice: How To Connect To Online NetworksHidden VillaWe work hard to understand our constituents. Most of our programs teams utilize a flexible program structure in which participants feel empowered to begin where they are at. Through "interest-based" data collection, we are able to understand the interest that drives or initiates the relationship with the organization.Practice: Research
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • http://socialmedia.policytool.net/
  • http://socialmedia.policytool.net/
  • Will hand out worksheets
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/cgc/5259321/sizes/m/
  • Transcript

    • 1. Peer Learning Group 2: Improving Social Media practices with Measurement Organizational Culture Indicators Feb. 5, 2013 Beth Kanter,Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    • 2. Welcome! If you experience any technical difficulties logging into the system, please contact Ready/Talk Customer support: 800.843.9166 Announce yourself when you get on the line Please use *6 to Mute your conference line Only themoderatorcan see you While we are waiting, play with the chats chat: Type in your name, organization, and location.
    • 3. Participant Roll Call California Coverage & Health Initiatives Center for Excellence in Nonprofits Center for Health and Gender Equity Coastal Watershed Council Community Foundation for Monterey County CoreAlign *7 unmute Hidden Villa * 6 mute Immigrant Legal Resource Center Los Altos Community Foundation National Abortion Federation (NAF) National Center Family Philanthropy Opera San Jose Palo Alto Art Center Philanthropic Ventures Foundation Preschool California Provide Radio Bilingue Reproductive Health Technologies Project Resources Law Group Resources Legacy Fund World YWCAAuditors: Cheryl Chang, Packard FoundationFriends of Deer Hollow (requested a profile, but necessary for auditing)Farallones Marine Sanctuary AssociationMEarthThe HEAL ProjectAlbaFarmers
    • 4. This call is beingrecorded *2 Flickr Photo by Malinki
    • 5. Peer Learning Group 2: Improving Social Media practices with Measurement Organizational Culture Indicators Feb. 5, 2013 Beth Kanter,Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    • 6. Agenda • Roll Call • Reminders • Reflections on using the CWRF assessment • Content: Culture Indicators - Networked Mindset and Social Media Policy • Discussion: Q/A about developing a social media policy for your organization • Next Steps: Commit to next action steps Only the Tweet yourmoderator can insightssee you chats #netnon
    • 7. Participants California Coverage & Health Initiatives Center for Excellence in Nonprofits Center for Health and Gender Equity Coastal Watershed CouncilCommunity Foundation for Monterey County CoreAlign Hidden Villa Immigrant Legal Resource Center Los Altos Community Foundation National Abortion Federation (NAF) National Center Family Philanthropy Opera San Jose Palo Alto Art Center Philanthropic Ventures Foundation Preschool California Provide Radio Bilingue Reproductive Health Technologies Project Resources Law Group Resources Legacy Fund World YWCA
    • 8. Beth Kanter
    • 9. Reminders: The Wiki If you want a wiki tutorial, we will do this at the end of the call. http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/
    • 10. Share the Group with other people on staff StealthMeasurement Closed Facebook Group
    • 11. Peer Learning Program Outcomes • Baseline level or score for social media practice improves by .5 • 50% or 10 of participants improve social media practices in at least one area: capacity, culture, strategy, measurement, monitoring, engagement, or content. • 25% or 5 participants apply social media best practices and share what they’ve learned with others on the culmination call. SCORE: 1.30
    • 12. Ladder of Engagement: Improving Best Practices Case Study 25% (5) Applied, Learned, 50% (10) Shared Applied, Learned POLL Example Applied, No Learning Did Not Apply Measurement Plan: Webinar Polls
    • 13. If you can’t fly then run, if you can’trun then walk, if you can’t walk thencrawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” Inspiration
    • 14. Where to focus … CRAWL WALK RUN FLY Linking Social with Ladder of Network BuildingCommunications Results and EngagementStrategy Networks Many Free Agents work forDevelopment Content Strategy you Pilot: Focus oneCulture Change program or channel Best Practices Multi-Channel Engagement, with measurement Content, and Measurement Measurement and Incremental Capacity learning in all above Reflection and Continuous Improvement
    • 15. Maturity of Practice: Crawl-Walk-Run-Fly CRAWL -1 WALK-2 RUN-3 FLY-4Categories Practices AverageCULTURE Networked Mindset 1.14 Institutional Support 1.62CAPACITY Staffing 1.24 Communications Strategy 1.38MEASUREMENT Analysis 1.14 Tools 1.52 Adjustment 1.67LISTENING Brand Monitoring 1.19 Influencer Research 1.19CONTENT Integration and Optimization 1.29ENGAGEMENT Ladder of Engagement 1.14 NETWORK Champions/Aligned Partners 1.10 Relationship Mapping 1.29 • 50% or 10 of participants improve social media practices in at least one or more areas: capacity, culture, strategy, measurement, monitoring, engagement, or content.
    • 16. CWRF – Applied “It helps us put some focused attention into our social media. In order to get the most out of this I am attempting to set some defined goals and areas where we might be able to leap to the next level. For now I just made a spreadsheet with the goal as the next stage and then want to involve others in deciding which ones we want to focus on. I doubt it would be realistic to jump in all of the categories and I somewhat recall saying an improvement in 5 of the indicators would be considered a success.”
    • 17. CWRF – Reflections • What insights did you get from reviewing the CWRF assessment? • What are some priority areas for improvement?
    • 18. Maturity of Practice: CWRF – Culture Indicators CRAWL WALK RUN FLY ScoreNetworked Understanding of Listening to and Comfort level with Leadership is 1.14Mindset networks that are cultivating greater comfortable using connected to relationships with organizational decentralized organization networks based on openness and decision-making and mapping networks. transparency. collective action with Leadership is using networks. Considers social networks and people inside and comfortable with outside of the showing organizations as personality. assets in strategy.
    • 19. A Network Mindset: A Leadership Style• Openness, transparency, decentralized decision- making, and collective action.• Listening and cultivating organizational and professional networks to achieve the impact• Leadership through active participation.• Sharing control of decision-making• Communicating through a network model, rather than a broadcast model• Data Informed
    • 20. Leading With A Network Mindset: Shift From Push To PullSF Goodwills CEO, Debbie Alvarez-Rodriguez
    • 21. Leading With A Network Mindset
    • 22. The Networked CEO Open and accessible to the world and building relationshipsMaking interests, hobbies, passions visible creates authenticity
    • 23. Blending Network Strategy With Communications Strategy From CEO to CNO Tweets links related to organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions.
    • 24. Networking Is Dynamic LearningSEEK SENSE SHAREIdentified key blogs and Summarizes article in a Engages with alignedonline sites in issue area tweet partnersScans and reads every Writes for Huffington Post Presentationsmorning and picks out best
    • 25. Be the Broker in the Structural Hole InMap (http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com/)Source: Meg Garlinghouse, LInkedIn
    • 26. From Crawl to Walk“We are a very small non profit with a membership that isexpanding. We are working on building and mapping ournetwork with limited resources. We work within a largercoalition of organizations on common interest issues and arebuilding our social media relationship with them, howeverhave not extensively mapped these connections.”“We understand who our network members are, but we donttake that into the SM world; we have good partnerships, butthey arent well-developed in SM.”
    • 27. From Crawl to Walk How To On Wiki
    • 28. Examples of Networked MindsetResources Legacy FundThere are extensive networks that exist around the issues we work on and the organizationswith whom we work. Having a clear understanding of these networks is important toefficient communication and to developing and maintaining relationships with keyindividuals and organizations that influence the conservation outcomes we care about.Practice: How have they gotten an understanding?Hidden VillaWe work hard to understand our constituents. Most of our programs teams utilize a flexibleprogram structure in which participants feel empowered to begin where they are at.Through "interest-based" data collection, we are able to understand the interest that drivesor initiates the relationship with the organization.Practice: Research
    • 29. Maturity of Practice: CWRF - Culture CRAWL WALK RUN FLY ScoreInstitutional Social media policy Social media policy Social media staff All staff use social 1.62Support is drafted and has been discussed position includes media effectively to gaining support and approved by facilitating training support organization through “road leadership. other staff to use objectives. shows” with social networks. departments
    • 30. Social Culture: Step 1 – Talk About the Issues
    • 31. The Rule Book: Social Media Policy Trust is Cheaper than ControlParticipation Guidelines for Everyonehttp://www.bethkanter.org/trust-control/
    • 32. Step 2: Write Down the Rules – Social Media Policy • Encouragement and support • Best practices • Tone • Why policy is needed • Expertise • Cases when it will be used, • Respect distributed • Quality • Oversight, notifications, and legal implications • Additional resources • Training • Guidelines • Press referrals • Identity and transparency • Escalation • Responsibility • Confidentiality • Links to policy examples on the • Judgment and common wiki sense Living Document! Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group
    • 33. Resources: Policy First Drafthttp://socialmedia.policytool.net/
    • 34. Resources: Living DocumentsSample policy created w/ policy tool and worksheet is on the wiki for your useAlso links to these resources that get more detailed, plus examples from nonprofits
    • 35. Share Your ProcessCommunity Foundation of Monterrey County“We have a policy and did a brown bag lunchon privacy issues with staff.”Radio Bilingue“We are currently in the process of drafting asocial media policy.”
    • 36. Discussion: Debrief How would you lead a discussion within your organization about the concerns?If you had a basic template for a social media policy, how would you ensure that it is discussed and adapted for your organization?
    • 37. Reflection • What is unclear? Questions? *6 mute Type into Chat * 7 unmute Only the moderator can see you chats
    • 38. Next Session Questions? Next Session: Capacity – Strategy and Staffing Feb 5: 1:00 pm PST Use Assessment : • Review your scores for the capacity indicators and reflect on what is needed to get your organization to the next level • Read the articles and resources on the wiki or shared in FB grp

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