May 13 workshop
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

May 13 workshop

on

  • 1,559 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,559
Views on SlideShare
1,513
Embed Views
46

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
3
Comments
1

1 Embed 46

http://bethkanter.wikispaces.com 46

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Fras1977PhotoThe Networked NGO in New Zealand
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/socialgoodbrasil/8179199091/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nep/2284817865/I love chocolate (agree/disagree) Agree/Disagree The Internet and social media are all well and good but they are simply tools and we shouldn’t over rely on it, because there are a huge number of women and girls that are not online. The challenges that we encounter when using the Internet and Social Media limit its effectiveness so much that we shouldn't even bother to use it Gender issues in the ‘real world’ are more important than those online Women and their organizations should engage in a policy discussion about the promotion of internet development with a vision of inclusion, access, freedom of expression, fairness and respect for human rights. We need to begin to engage effectively our political leaderships, to deliver for us, as NGOS and Individuals we cannot provide electricity nor install optic fibre cables-  Social media can help our own NGOs, activists, and others in our countries spread ideas and calls for action for Women’s Rights.  Women’s Rights Organizations, including ours, need to make use of social media and networked approaches to get better results in our social change agendas Women’s Rights organizations need to be strategic about social media and the Internet because traffickers are now utilizing Social media to traffic girls and women for prostitution and other purposes 
  •  
  •  
  • I’ve had the honor of having a front row seat in a new field – that integrates Internet technology into social change work. Started in 1992 and have seen a lot of change and have had to upgrade myself along the way …. Even just 5 or 6 years
  • My kids were adopted from Cambodia and I took them to visit their homeland last month – and there is now pervasive broadband wifi and even 3 g in the on smart phones that can be access in rural areas CHEAPLY
  • Also through Facebook, I’ve kept connected to the bloggers, like Mongkol who we met in Phnom Phnom. We decided to take a taxi from Phnom Penh to Siem Reap – a five hour drive – the road was good, but still the safety standards are not what they are in the US – and the drivers go fast. So I had mongkol write a sign in Khmer that read …
  • We made safely to Siem Reap and the Temples – and even climbed up to the Tre Rup and got this photo with the monk … … .. Had a glorius time
  • But we had to drive back to Phnom Penh. This time, the taxi had seat belts in the back of the card, but thee road often looked this … Our driver didn’t understand much english, and was talking on his cell phone a lot of the time!
  • I distracted myself by looking at Facebook with my 3G connection! So I posted this status update …
  • As part of my work at the Packard Foundation as visiting scholar, I co-authored a book called the Networked Nonprofit – about how all this connectedness is changing the way that nonprofits do their work – from the inside out. I’ve had the opportunity to teach workshops to ngos all over the world, most recently in the Middle East as part of a state department Civil Society 2.0.
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words.Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/ounder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/soyignatius/5544750526/sizes/l/in/photostream/The Parkinson’s Association is doing just that.   They have organized a fundraiser called “Summit4Stemcell.”  The goal is to fund non-embryonic stem cell research that will result in a treatment for Parkinson’s while inspiring people with the disease to move beyond their physical limitations.     A group of 17 passionate mountain climbers is raising money for this project by climbing Mt. Kiilimanjaro (19,340 ft high!) in September.You might be wondering why I’m writing about this?  It’s personal.My cousin, Rebecca Kanter (a millennial) is one of the climbers.   She is doing the climb in honor of my Dad who is suffers from Parkinsonism – there is no cure.    You can treat the symptoms and my Dad is working very hard on doing physical therapy which has allowed him to walk, with a walker.    Having been a competitive swimmer and surfer, he knows the discipline of working hard for a goal.  It was not unlike how he has worked hard as a doctor and in the Navy during WW2.Here’s why Rebecca is taking on this challenge Uncle Earl has Parkinsonism, and was in the hospital for his health-related issues. His family has since brought him home, but as my father described to me, they’re having to make adjustments to the house to accomodate my uncle’s physical challenges. Listening to the NPR report, especially the voices of the people (who I would later learn were Ken and Brad) taking on this enormous undertaking of sumitting Kilimanjaro while dealing with Parkinson’s, made me think about my Uncle Earl, the challenges he is facing in his life, and the opportunities — like summiting a mountain — that are no longer available to him. I was overwhelmed by the inspiration to do something.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/soyignatius/5544750526/sizes/l/in/photostream/The Parkinson’s Association is doing just that.   They have organized a fundraiser called “Summit4Stemcell.”  The goal is to fund non-embryonic stem cell research that will result in a treatment for Parkinson’s while inspiring people with the disease to move beyond their physical limitations.     A group of 17 passionate mountain climbers is raising money for this project by climbing Mt. Kiilimanjaro (19,340 ft high!) in September.You might be wondering why I’m writing about this?  It’s personal.My cousin, Rebecca Kanter (a millennial) is one of the climbers.   She is doing the climb in honor of my Dad who is suffers from Parkinsonism – there is no cure.    You can treat the symptoms and my Dad is working very hard on doing physical therapy which has allowed him to walk, with a walker.    Having been a competitive swimmer and surfer, he knows the discipline of working hard for a goal.  It was not unlike how he has worked hard as a doctor and in the Navy during WW2.Here’s why Rebecca is taking on this challenge Uncle Earl has Parkinsonism, and was in the hospital for his health-related issues. His family has since brought him home, but as my father described to me, they’re having to make adjustments to the house to accomodate my uncle’s physical challenges. Listening to the NPR report, especially the voices of the people (who I would later learn were Ken and Brad) taking on this enormous undertaking of sumitting Kilimanjaro while dealing with Parkinson’s, made me think about my Uncle Earl, the challenges he is facing in his life, and the opportunities — like summiting a mountain — that are no longer available to him. I was overwhelmed by the inspiration to do something.
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • The transition from working like this to this – doesn’t happen over night, can’t flip a switch
  • Credit InnonetImageSource: Wikipedia/Map of Six Degrees Theory of Social Connectivityhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Six_degrees_of_separation.pngText: Chapter 2: Understanding Networks – The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine
  • Social network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/cor_lems/4316327287/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/smileham/5412211359/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/ronmacphotos/5644495596/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/Framework to guide my coaching and peer learning design over the yearsThere are different stages of development for networked nonprofits. The Crawl StageCrawlers are not using social media consistently or measurement processes; they also lack a robust communications strategy. Crawlers can be small or large nonprofits that have all the basics in place, but they either lack a social culture or resist transforming from a command-and-control style to a more networked mindset. These nonprofits need to develop a strategy. Even with a communications strategy in place, some organizations may face challenges to adopting a networked way of working. If so, they should start with a discussion of the organizational issues, followed by codifying the rules in a social media policy. They should also anticipate learning and benefiting from inspiring stories from peers.The Walk StageNonprofits in this stage are using several social media channels consistently, but may not be strategic or fully embracing best practices—maybe they don’t engage with users, or they only share content and messaging produced by their own organization. These nonprofits need to create a social media strategy to support short- and long-term objectives, such policy change or increasing public engagement on an issue. Walkers internalize listening, and use the data they collect to improve engagement and some content best practices.These organizations implement small, low-risk projects that collect stories, learning, and metrics to help leadership better understand the value, benefits, and costs. Walkers should focus on one or two social media tools, going deep on tactics and generating tangible results and learning. They must identify low-cost ways to build capacity internally, such as integrating social media responsibilities into existing staff jobs. Capacity is built with support from leadership and a social media policy formalizes the value and vision.The Run StageRunners use more than two social media channels as part of an integrated strategy, identifying key result areas and metrics that drive everything they do. They have a formal ladder of engagement that illustrates how supporters move from just hearing about your organization to actively engaging, volunteering, or donating to your organization. This is used to guide strategy and measurement. They visualize their networks and measure relationships. These organizations practice basic measurement religiously and use data to make decisions about social media best practices.In these organizations, a single department does not guard social media, and staff are comfortable working transparently and with people outside the organization. The board is also using social media as part of its governance role.To build internal capacity, runners invest in a community manager whose job it is to build relationships with people on social media or emerging platforms. These organizations know how to create great content, and use an editorial calendar to coordinate and curate content across channels. They are routinely tracking the performance of their content strategy and adjust based on measurement.The Fly StageThese organizations have institutionalized everything in the running stage. Flyers embrace failure and success alike, and learn from both. Flyers are part of a vibrant network of people and organizations all focused on social change. They use sophisticated measurement techniques, tools, and processes.http://www.flickr.com/photos/oreoqueen/3235090633/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathandesign/7031920221/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/bdfbrasil/2416260064/sizes/m/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/http://www.flickr.com/photos/levymh/6891554365/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/
  • The maturing of practice framework includes looking at 7 best practice areas for networked approaches and social media – and some specific indicators – and looking at what they look at the different maturity levels. If you remember the application form, it asked you questions and that’s how I came up with the scoring system. If you were “crawl” you got 1, Walk 2, Run 3, and Fly 4 – and then I average the scores for the group. I also could come up with a score for your organization overall.So, if you got a 1.5, it means that you are on your way to walking.https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AtsV5h84LWk0dFhENWFXVzBwZ2lWOGlzazZSek5Iemc#gid=1
  • But, it isn’t just a spectator sport, it’s a contact sport – you have to be presence and engage ..This is the hard part … especially for CEOs of a certain age – this shift ..
  • Amy Boroff (@njdevmgr), development manager for Junior Achievement of NJ in Princeton [emphasis added], discovered one of her new Twitter followers was Kate Specchio (@ecsfoundation), co-founder of Morris County-based The Emily C. Specchio Foundation. Through their tweets, Amy recognized the potential for working together. They continued to communicate on Twitter in real-time, after working hours, to learn more about each respective organization. After several weeks, JANJ submitted a proposal to ECS for funding for an inaugural event: the Women's Future Leadership Forum. The ECS Foundation accepted the proposal and granted funds to help support aspiring female high school students become future leaders.
  • http://www.si.edu/content/pdf/about/sd/SD-814.pdfhttp://www.bethkanter.org/category/organizational-culture/
  • This is a very small NGO in the US. The have 3 people on staff. Each staff person is responsible for one area of their social media related to a SMART objective.Increase awareness by producing one FLIP camera video per week and posting on YouTubeIncrease engagement by reaching out to and encouraging bloggers to write about the organization’s programsIncrease engagement and conversation about the organization’s program by posting content and engaging with fans on FacebookThey have a weekly 20 minute meeting to discuss their plans of what they’re going to do and evaluate how they did last week
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • You also have to understand audience -- I often get questions, what platform should we be using. I don’t know, ask your audience. You need a good understanding of these questions.
  • Content strategy is the technique of creating, curating, repurposing, and sharing relevant and valuable content across your channels (web site, email, print, social, and mobile) to attract, acquire, and engage a clearly defined and understood target audience - with the objective of driving results. You need to have a clear logic path from objective, audience, and content – as well as an internal practice that allows you create, curate, repurpose, and track the performance of your social content so you can optimize it.
  • MonthlyCommon messaging - along with partners on health careShare the responsibility – brainstorm contentIntegrate with what is timelyGet input from partners and friends – group learning
  • They focused on developing a robust engagement and content strategy – that was integrated with other channels, all to support objectives in communications strategy and outcomes – and used measurement. They started with one channel – FB …
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/technorandy/3161373190/sizes/o/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/pruzicka/335467743/sizes/l/
  • http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/21/nomophobia-attacks-harris-says-74-of-users-panic-over-phone-loss-58-of-us-cant-stay-away-from-mobiles-for-more-than-an-hour/We have to cover a lot of ground in our work today and do it while logged on to the greatest tool for distraction and procrastination ever invented! And now we can access the Internet anytime, anywherehttp://techcrunch.com/2012/06/21/nomophobia-attacks-harris-says-74-of-users-panic-over-phone-loss-58-of-us-cant-stay-away-from-mobiles-for-more-than-an-hour/Nearly 60% said they don’t go an hour without checking their phone. Younger folks were the most addicted: 63% of women and 73% of men ages 18-34 say they don’t go an hour without checking their phones.Our connection never sleeps. 54% said they check their phones while lying in bed: before they go to sleep, after they wake up, even in the middle of the night.We need access everywhere. Nearly 40% admit to checking their phone while on the toilet.Learning how to use mindfulness online is an essential work place skill!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tzofia/270800047/sizes/m/in/photostream/http://www.flickr.com/photos/lululemonathletica/5724696305/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tracyhunter/144845928/sizes/l/
  • Share pair 2 xThink and Write index card – one thing to put into practiceBring into the circleMake one commitment for advancing their social media strategyOne word to resonate with you today …Future
  • http://bit.ly/network-leadership

May 13 workshop Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Networked NGOin New ZealandBeth KanterMaster TrainerWorkshopco-hosted by VolunteeringAucklandMay 13, 2013Photo by Fras1977
  • 2. WelcomeYour Burning Questions!Please write downyour burningquestion aboutnetworkednonprofits or socialmedia on sticky noteWhat do you wantanswered by the endof the day?Post it on the flipchart
  • 3. Beth Kanter: Master Trainer, Author, and ChangeMaker
  • 4. Stand up, Sit DownWho Are You?
  • 5. AGENDAOUTCOMESInteractiveFun#netnonFRAMINGGet InspiredUnderstand howbeing networkedcan reach yourgoalsNetworked NonprofitsNetwork MapsBreakCrawl, Walk, Run, FlySmarter Social MediaPractical TipsThe Agenda
  • 6. SHARE PAIRS AND POPCORNIntroduce yourself to someone you don’t knowand share your burning question!
  • 7. Human Spectragram: Examining our Attitudes about socialmedia and networksAgree DisagreeI love kiwi fruits
  • 8. I am very comfortable using social media andonline toolsAgree Disagree
  • 9. NZ NGOS including ours need to make use ofsocial media and networked approaches to getbetter results in our social change agendasAgree Disagree
  • 10. How Online Social NetworksAre Changing Our Lives, Work, and Society
  • 11. My nonprofit tech capacitybuilding work begins ….
  • 12. Photo by Steve Goodman2007
  • 13. 2012
  • 14. Definition: Networked NonprofitsNetworked Nonprofits aresimple, agile, and transparent NGOs.They are experts at using social mediatools to make the world a better place.Networked Nonprofits first must “be”before they can “do.”For some NGOS, it means changing theway they work.Others naturally work in a networked wayso change isn’t as difficult.
  • 15. Networked NGOs
  • 16. Walking is like climbing a mountain
  • 17. Non-embryonic stem cell research for Parkinson’s
  • 18. A networked world and the Internet is also having aprofound impact on the way NGOs communicate withstakeholders, and even deliver programs.Remember: Disruption is can be our friend …..
  • 19. Share Pair: How is the changing media landscape andconnectedness impacting you personally and/or your NGO?
  • 20. Pratham Books
  • 21. Pratham Books
  • 22. Modified illustration by David ArmanoThe Micro-Sociology of NetworksNGONGO: Not Networked
  • 23. With apologies to David Armano for hacking his visual!Source: The Micro-Sociology of NetworksNGOStaffNetworked NgoNetworks
  • 24. Becoming a Networked NGO Beginswith Understanding Your Network
  • 25. Networks are collections ofpeople and organizationsconnected to one another.The glue that holds themtogether is relationships– itis sharedinterests, connections, andsocial change outcomes.Online tools can help usleverage our networks tomake social change.Network: DefinitionImage Source: Innonet
  • 26. What is networking?Connecting the dots …..
  • 27. How Nonprofits Visualize Their Networks
  • 28. Networks Connected To StrategyNational Wildlife FederationBrought together team that isworking on advocacy strategy tosupport a law that encourageschildren to play outside.Team mapped their 5 “go topeople” about this issueLook at connections and strategicvalue of relationships, gaps
  • 29. Create Your Map1. Use sticky notes, markers andposter paper to create yourorganization’s map.2. Think about communicationsgoals and brainstorm a list of“go to”people, organizations, andonline resources3. Decide on different colors todistinguish between differenttypes, write the names on thesticky notes4. Identify influencers, discussspecific ties and connections.Draw the connections
  • 30. Walk About, View Other Maps, Leave NotesVisualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to helpsupport your program or communications goals.What insights did youlearn from mapping yournetwork?How can you each useyour professionalnetworks to support oneanother’s social mediastrategy work?
  • 31. BREAK!15 minutes
  • 32. Speed Debrief: 60 Seconds
  • 33. The Networked NonprofitIn PracticeCrawl, Walk, Run, Fly
  • 34. CRAWL WALK RUN FLYMaturity of Practice: Where is Your Organization?Linking Social withResults andNetworksPilot: Focus oneprogram or channelwith measurementIncremental CapacityLadder ofEngagementContent StrategyBest PracticesMeasurement andlearning in all aboveMarketing StrategyDevelopmentCulture ChangeNetwork BuildingMany champions and freeagents work for youMulti-ChannelEngagement, Content, andMeasurementReflection and ContinuousImprovement
  • 35. Share Pair: Where is your organization?Where is your organization now? What does that looklike? What do you need to get to the next level?
  • 36. Maturity of Practice: Crawl-Walk-Run-FlyCategories PracticesCULTURE Networked MindsetInstitutional SupportCAPACITY StaffingStrategyMEASUREMENT AnalysisToolsAdjustmentLISTENING Brand MonitoringInfluencer ResearchENGAGEMENT Ladder of EngagementCONTENT Integration/OptimizationNETWORK Influencer EngagementRelationship Mapping1 2 3 4
  • 37. The Networked Mindset
  • 38. A Network Mindset: A Leadership Style• Openness, transparency, decentralized decision-making, andcollective action.• Listening and cultivating organizational and professionalnetworks to achieve the impact• Leadership through active participation.• Social Media Policy living document, all staff participate includingleaders• Sharing control of decision-making• Communicating through a network model, rather than abroadcast model• Data-Informed
  • 39. “As a co-founder and director ofCurative, I am an avid user of SocialMedia channels for both personal andprofessional worlds.”
  • 40. The Networked NGO Leader: 1 Tweet = 1000 by StaffOpen and accessible to the world andbuilding relationshipsMaking interests, hobbies, passions visiblecreates authenticity
  • 41. You want meto startTweeting too?From scarcity to abundance …
  • 42. Best Practice: Write Down the Rules – Social Media PolicyRecruit and Scale – All Volunteers, New Volunteershttp://www.bethkanter.org/category/organizational-culture/
  • 43. • 3 person staff• Social mediaresponsibilities in all threejob descriptions• Each person 2-4 hoursper week• Weekly 20 minutemeeting to coordinate• Three initiatives tosupport SMARTobjectives• Weekly video w/Flip• Blogger outreach• FacebookSocial Media for Small NGOs: 30 Minutes A Day
  • 44. 532 41What are some of your culture challenges inadopting social media? How to change?
  • 45. BREAK!15 minutes
  • 46. SMARTer Social Media
  • 47. CWRF - STRATEGYCRAWL WALK RUN FLYConsideration ofcommunications strategywith SMART objectivesand audiences andstrategies for brandingand web presence. SocialMedia is not fully aligned.Strategic plan with SMARTobjectives and audiencesfor branding and webpresence, include strategypoints to align socialmedia for one or twosocial media channels.Strategic plan withSMART objectives andaudience definition.Includes integratedcontent, engagementstrategy, and formalchampions/influencerprogram and workingwith aligned partners.Uses more than twosocial media channels.Strategic plan with SMARTobjectives and audiencedefinition. Includesintegrated content,engagement strategy, andformalchampions/influencerprogram and working withaligned partners. Usesmore than three socialmedia channels. Formalprocess for testing andadopting social mediachannels.1.83
  • 48. PeopleObjectivesStrategiesToolsPOST FRAMEWORKExercise
  • 49. • What keeps them up at night?• What are they currently seeking?• Where do they go for information?• What influences their decisions?• What’s important to them?• What makes them act?POST: KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE
  • 50. PEOPLE: Artists and people in their communityOBJECTIVES:Increase engagement by 2 comments per post by FY 2013Content analysis of conversations: Does it make theorganization more accessible?Increase enrollment in classes and attendance at events by5% by FY 201310% students /attenders say they heard about us throughFacebookSTRATEGYShow the human face of artists, remove the mystique, getaudience to share their favorites, connect with otherorganizations.TOOLSFocused on one social channel (Facebook) to use bestpractices and align engagement/content with other channelswhich includes flyers, emails, and web site.POST APPLIED: SMALL ARTS NONPROFIT
  • 51. • Reach, Engagement, Action, DollarsResults1. How many?2. By when?3. Measure with metricsPOST: SMART OBJECTIVES
  • 52. SMARTER SOCIAL MEDIA: CREATE A POSTERCreate A PosterSMARTOBJECTIVETARGETAUDIENCESSUCCESSMETRICS
  • 53. SMARTER SOCIAL MEDIA: GALLERY WALKHang YourPoster on WallLook at otherpostersLeave Notes
  • 54. Walking Speed Debrief: One Minute
  • 55. WelcomeReflections• What resonated?• What questionsremain?Write on a stickynote and post it onthe flip chart
  • 56. Social Media Integration and OptimizationContentEngagementListeningChampions
  • 57. Maturity of Practice: CWRF – ContentCRAWL WALK RUN FLYShares content thatmay be relevant toaudience, but notconsistently and notmeasuringUses an editorialcalendar to aligncontent with objectivesand audiences topublish acrosschannels consistently –aligns with programand advocacycalendarsUses an editorialcalendar to aligncontent with objectivesand audiences topublish acrosschannels consistentlyand measuresperformanceUses an editorialcalendar to aligncontent with objectivesand audiences topublish acrosschannels consistently,measuresperformance, and usesdata to plan content1.67
  • 58. ObjectiveAudienceContentSocial Media Content: 20 Minutes A Day
  • 59. Editorial Calendar ExampleJanuary 2013United Ways of California www.unitedwaysCA.org 72Include hashtags (#) and URL resources for staff to do some research on topics
  • 60. Social Content Optimization• Focus on publishing high-quality, engaging, relevantcontent• Timing and Frequency• Post questions• Use images/visuals, but varytype of content and test• Clear to call to action• Follow your analytics
  • 61. Date Hook Web Email Facebook Twitter Blog12345671. Volunteer?2. Brainstorm an editorialcalendar for one week.3. Use template, stickynotes, and poster paperPhoto Source: Beth KanterFriending the Finish Line Peer Group
  • 62. Result Metrics Analysis QuestionConsumption ViewsReachFollowersDoes your audience care about the topics yourcontent covers? Are they consuming yourcontent?Engagement Re-tweetsSharesCommentsDoes your content mean enough to youraudience for them to share it or engage with it?Action ReferralsSign UpsPhone CallsDoes your content help you achieve your goals?Revenue DollarsDonorsVolunteersDoes your content help you raise money, recruitvolunteers or save time?Measuring Your Content
  • 63. You Don’t Have To Measure All Right Awayhttp://bit.ly/npspreadsheet
  • 64. Use Data To Make Better DecisionsLook for patterns
  • 65. Share PairHow will you coordinate, create, and measure your socialmedia content? What questions do you still have?
  • 66. Stretch Break
  • 67. MindfulSocial Media orMind Full?Photo by pruzicka
  • 68. Managing Your Attention Online: Why Is It An ImportantNetworking Skill?
  • 69. 1. When you open email or do social media tasks, does it make you feel anxious?2. When you are seeking information to curate, have you ever forgotten what it was inthe first place you wanted to accomplish?3. Do you ever wish electronic information would just go away?4. Do you experience frustration at the amount of electronic information you need toprocess daily?5. Do you sit at your computer for longer than 30 minutes at a time without gettingup to take a break?6. Do you constantly check (even in the bathroom on your mobile phone) youremail, Twitter or other online service?7. Is the only time youre off line is when you are sleeping?8. Do you feel that you often cannot concentrate?9. Do you get anxious if you are offline for more than a few hours?10.Do you find yourself easily distracted by online resources that allow you to avoidother, pending work?Self-Knowledge Is The First StepA few quick assessment questionsAdd up your score: # of YES answers
  • 70. 0…1…2…3…4…5…6…7…8…9…10Source: LulumonathleticaMindful Online………………………………………………………..Need Help NowWhat’s Your Attention Focusing Score?
  • 71. • Understand your goals and priorities andask yourself at regular intervals whetheryour current activity serves your higherpriority.• Notice when your attention haswandered, and then gently bringing itback to focus on your highest priority• Sometimes in order to learn or deepenrelationships -- exploring from link to linkis permissible – and important. Don’tmake attention training so rigid that itdestroys flow.Source: Howard RheingoldNetSmartWhat does it mean to manage your attention while yourcurate or other social media tasks?
  • 72. Exercise: Shift Into A Reflective Mindset
  • 73. Takeaways: Share Pairs• What’s one tip or technique that youcan put into practice next week to bemore mindful online?
  • 74. Your Questions Answered: Creating An Online Resource• What are your remaining questions aboutimplementing social media?• What is still unclear?• Feedback on Your Social Media Channelshttp://bethkanter.wikispaces.com/NZ+Half-Day+Workshop
  • 75. Glenfield Community Centrehttp://www.glenfieldcommunitycentre.co.nzhttp://www.facebook.com/GlenfieldCommunityCentreWAVES Trusthttp://www.waves.org.nzCancer Society Auckland Northlandhttp://www.cancersocietyauckland.org.nzIHChttp://www.ihc.org.nz
  • 76. The Parenting Placehttp://www.theparentingplace.comhttp://www.facebook.com/theparentingplacehttps://twitter.com/@parentingplacehttp://pinterest.com/tppdotcom/Pukekohe Golf Clubhttp://www.pukekohegolf.co.nzhttp://www.twitter.com/pukekohegolfEnglish Language Partners North Shorehttp://englishlanguage.org.nz/http://www.facebook.com/groups/youthworx/http://www.youtube.com/theparentingplace
  • 77. Closing Circle and Reflection
  • 78. Thank you!www.bethkanter.orgwww.facebook.com/beth.kanter.blog@kanter on Twitter