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Listening for Nonprofits in a Connected World

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http://www.briansolis.com/2009/08/listening-literacy-for-nonprofits%E2%80%A8/

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/abrinsky/3754792367/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/afiler/226337451/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/spine/263214639 But first you have to listen
  • We know people are talking but we’re not listening to conversation. First, feeling defensive and like going to war. Needed more transparency Now, embracing social media.
  • 5. Reporting and Internal Change Send monthly update to Communication leads consisting of aggregated data on mentions from their lines of service. J&J: watched mentions to determine where various industries stood so we’d know whether to back off or continue our aggressive PR push to shame them into dropping the suit.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/americanredcross/2584636379/ 3. Response Determine who needs action, whether thanks and relationship building or repairing a customer service issue. Spend time reading other posts by blogger to get a sense of what they’re about Use judgment in avenue of response – email, comment, or better left alone.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/cursedthing/1286047620/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/stewart/106963896/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/axsdeny/2585892490/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeygottawa/2195941429/
  • Turn ads off - 5/month Social Media Listening Literacy for Nonprofits by Beth Kanter 1. Active Listening: Why You need to ask why you are listening, connect listening to decisions, and get your organization ready to participate in the listening effort. Beth Kanter, Examples of How Listening Returns Value for Nonprofit Organizations Beth Kanter, Getting Your Nonprofit Ready To Listen A post that defines listening 2. Listening Literacy Skills The 4 most important listening literacy skills are Keywords Are King: Composing and refining keywords Seeing the Forest Through The Trees: Pattern analysis and synthesis of findings Engaging effectively : Don't just listen unless your mission is market research Information Coping Skills : Avoiding information overload Beth Kanter, Listening Literacy Skills 3. Your Most Important Listening Tool: RSS Reader Set up aside a small block of time to read your feeds everyday Clean house often, RSS subscriptions tend to pile up Don't feel like you have to read every post on every blog, use the "Mark Read" option
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/evaekeblad/2389240224/ Nonprofit Name Other nonprofit names in your space Program, services, and event names CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization Other nonprofits with similar program names Your brand or tagline URLs for your blog, web site, online community Industry terms or other phrases Your known strengths and weaknesses.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shuttercat7/418349082/ Nonprofit Name Other nonprofit names in your space Program, services, and event names CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization Other nonprofits with similar program names Your brand or tagline URLs for your blog, web site, online community Industry terms or other phrases Your known strengths and weaknesses.
  • https://adwords.google.com/select/KeywordToolExternal
  • http://adlab.microsoft.com/Keyword-Mutation-Detection/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulgi/280789933/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/meredithfarmer/318077155/ Start slow and build Set up is the worst = get over the vertigo
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/25356196@N08/2533431428/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jfchenier/1689577842/
  • Reiteracy is Social Media Listening Literacy You may not know what is not worth searching until you try it and revise based on what you see.  Don't assume that you'll get it right on the first try, either.  It takes some and a little bit of a reiterative process to fine-tune those key words. Interpretation tips: Skim the dashboard at pre-defined intervals. Don’t click on every link. Hover over to get text abstract, follow if relevant, use  your brain and check it out! Ignore spam as much as possible. Set up mission critical keywords as email alerts for archiving and fast notification. Subscribe to any keyword twice, once by feed and once by Google Email Alert. Not every channel provides email alerts. Third party tools make it possible in some channels like TweetBeep does for Twitter. Each search channel has a somewhat unique method to generate feed subscription links for keywords, including 3rd party tools to create RSS feeds for keyword level searches. Just figure out how to add new channels. Remember, iGoogle is just one feed reader. Use the reader of your choice if you already have a comfort level.
  • http://www.themeasurementstandard.com/issues/5-1-08/kowalskiyoutube5-1-08.asp
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jfchenier/556673834/in/set-72157600215553324
  • Source If they are talking about you , (or your products or your people or whatever may be important to your organization), read the posts and make a simple "problem/not-a-problem" decision. Divide the posts into "we-would-approve" or "we-would-not-approve" piles. If what they are saying is not a problem, put it in a file and keep track of the themes or positive messages to learn what you are doing right. If what they are saying is a problem, then decide if it is a little problem or a big problem. If it is a small problem, put it in a file, keep track of the themes or negative messages expressed, and be prepared to discuss specific points and trends. If it is a big problem, call your boss and swing into crisis mode. Worst Case Scenario: One of your periodic searches finds a big problem -- something important that you have to deal with immediately. First, congratulate yourself that you identified it in such a timely fashion. Then warn your boss and swing into full crisis mode. Odds are that dealing with this will involve a full blown response in several media. http://www.themeasurementstandard.com/issues/12-1-08/measuringfacebook12-1-08.asp
  • Talking about particular fish, clarifying the information Logo Recipes Exhibit ideas
  • Become the Queen of Commenting http://www.flickr.com/photos/wolfhound/241519942/
  • How do you decide when to respond? When do you NOT respond? Avoiding big borther http://www.buzznumbershq.com/blog/labels/Social%20Media%20Monitoring.html
  • Source If they are talking about you , (or your products or your people or whatever may be important to your organization), read the posts and make a simple "problem/not-a-problem" decision. Divide the posts into "we-would-approve" or "we-would-not-approve" piles. If what they are saying is not a problem, put it in a file and keep track of the themes or positive messages to learn what you are doing right. If what they are saying is a problem, then decide if it is a little problem or a big problem. If it is a small problem, put it in a file, keep track of the themes or negative messages expressed, and be prepared to discuss specific points and trends. If it is a big problem, call your boss and swing into crisis mode. Worst Case Scenario: One of your periodic searches finds a big problem -- something important that you have to deal with immediately. First, congratulate yourself that you identified it in such a timely fashion. Then warn your boss and swing into full crisis mode. Odds are that dealing with this will involve a full blown response in several media. http://www.themeasurementstandard.com/issues/12-1-08/measuringfacebook12-1-08.asp
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/isaacschlueter/169125188/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/timbradshaw/1096140242/
  • 5. Reporting and Internal Change Send monthly update to Communication leads consisting of aggregated data on mentions from their lines of service. J&J: watched mentions to determine where various industries stood so we’d know whether to back off or continue our aggressive PR push to shame them into dropping the suit.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shuttercat7/418349082/
  • http://darmano.typepad.com/ logic_emotion/2009/01/weve-been-thinking-about-the-current-economic-climate-and-the-pressure-not-to-mention-scrutiny-digital-if-not-all-initi.html

Listening for Nonprofits in a Connected World Listening for Nonprofits in a Connected World Presentation Transcript

  • Listening in a Connected World for Nonprofits Beth Kanter, Beth’s Blog
  • Workshop Leader Beth Kanter, Beth’s Blog
  • This is a Remix of a Remix http://www.wearemedia.org/Listening+and+Engaging
  • ::assumptions
  • There are people out there who are interested in your issues or organization’s programs. (whether we know them or not)
  • “ It is important to connect with people based on their interests (I will sometimes search twitter for "kids outside" and then compliment them on giving their kids a green hour!)  ” Danielle Brigida
  • Those people are active in our communities or organizations. (whether we help them or not)
  • Source: Nina Simon http://museumtwo.blogspot.com
  • We want to engage those interested and active people in our work. (whether we agree with them or not)
  •  
  • That’s the heart of social media success … Engaging with interested and active people to take action.
  •  
    • First foray into social media was a listening project in 2006
    • People were talking and they needed to listen
    • At first, felt like going to war, but changed internal perception of social media
    The Red Cross Case Study: Listening Comes First
  • Listen: Monitor, Compile, Distribute, Reflect I took an American Red Cross class I thought was less than satisfactory. […] The local chapter director. called me to talk about it honestly. They care about me and they’re willing to go the extra mile. I am now significantly more likely to take another class than I was before.” - Blogger
  • Look for Trends Over Time Very important step!
  • Relationship building Customer service issue Influencer complaining … Staff determines comments or tweets that need response
  • Listening doesn’t have to stay in the communications department – becoming a listening organization leverage more dramatic results
  • What’s in Wendy’s Tool Box?
  •  
    • What can professional tools do that free ones can’t?
    • Start with free tools, perfect your radar, look for ways that professional tools can save you time
    • Growing number of vendors, do your due diligence
    • Demo
    • Changes internal perception of social media value
    • Improves relationships with audience and identifies influencers
    • Incremental improvements for campaigns
    • Working with affiliates
    Listen: What’s the Value?
  • ::the six steps
    • Get your organization ready
    • Use your RSS Reader like a Rock Star
    • Brainstorm Keywords
    • Set up your listening dashboard
    • Make listening and engaging a practice an ongoing process
    • Build in time for reflection
  • 1. Get your organization ready to listen
  • How will you organize listening?
    • Who will do the listening and responding?
    • Response policy?
    • How much time will you allocate?
    • How will you analyze the results and share insights?
    • How will you know if listening has be useful?
  • 2. Use Your RSS Reader Like A Rock Star!
  • Which one is right for you?
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Small block of time for daily reading Clean house, reorganize Don’t feel obligated to read everything Good RSS Habits
    • Nonprofit Name
    • Other nonprofit names in your space
    • Program, services, and event names
    • CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization
    • Other nonprofits with similar program names
    • Your brand or tagline
    • URLs for your blog, web site, online community
    • Industry terms or other phrases
    • Issue area, synonyms, geography
    • Your known strengths and weaknesses.
      • 3. Brainstorm Keywords
  • Try to avoid generic terms.  If your organization's name or program names contain generic words, use Boolean operators like "AND" or "NOT."
      • What NOT to search for?
      • Think Offline, Involve Other People in Your Organization
    Brainstorm Related Words Why Important List Your Key Words/Phrases
  • https:// adwords.google.com/select/KeywordToolExternal Use Online Keyword Tools
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 4. Set up Your Feeds and Add To Your Reader or Dashboard
  • What Where else is does your audience hang out? Other Blog Feeds Influencer Bloggers Key words/phrases Persistent Searches Basics Ego Searches
  • Where
  • Don’t Panic!!
  • 5. Make Listening and Engaging a Practice
  • Just Starting: Lurk for the first 30 days
  • Start with a small, select number of feeds Review feeds as part of your routine Open interesting links in new tabs Read and follow interesting links in comments Subscribe to new feeds Revise keywords as you go Identify mission critical keywords Share a summary weekly w/others Establish Good Habits
  • Example: Finding Influencer Bloggers
  •  
  • Look for bridge bloggers
  • Add them to your reader
    • Slow growth at first, spider out
    • Don’t be afraid to clean, unsubscribe, and reorganize
    • Check out Google Page Rank
    • You can check out their monthly views
    • You can check out their technorati ranking
    Building Your Feeds and Finding Influencer Bloggers
  •  
  • Source: Kd Paine – Buy her book, read her blog
  •  
  •  
  • Start engaging
  • Not Problem If you find people talking about you …. Keep track of themes Keep track of positives Engage Look for stories to repurpose
  •  
  • Respond like a queen Add value to the conversation Don’t be afraid to disagree Keep to the point of the topic Point to relevant sources if you have more information Watch the conversation develop Humor works Avoid big brother
  •  
  • Problem If you find people talking about you …. Big Problem Little Problem Track themes Be prepared to engage Be prepared to act swiftly
  • Listening for Tone, Volume, and Sentiment
  • Swing into crisis mode and call in the boss
  •  
  • 6. Regular Time for Reflection
  • Are the topics of conversation changing? Is the tone, sentiment, or volume changing? Where are the most interesting conversations taking place? What does this mean for your strategy or programs? How can you use the information to improve what your are doing? Is there great content (stories) that you can repurpose elsewhere?
  • Questions? Reflections?
  • ::the six steps
    • Get your organization ready
    • Use your RSS Reader like a Rock Star
    • Brainstorm Keywords
    • Set up your listening dashboard
    • Make listening and engaging a practice an ongoing process
    • Build in time for reflection
  • Sources of Inspiration KD Paine, Queen of Measurement http:// www.themeasurementstandard.com / (Buy her book, read her blog) WeAreMedia: Nonprofit Social Media Starter Kit http://www.wearemedia.org/ (I’m the wiki facilitator and gardener. Check out the Tool Box section) Marnie Webb’s Slideshow on Listening http://www.slideshare.net/ext337/listening-in-a-digital-world All Photos Creative Commons Licensed from Flickr and attribution in notes
  • Beth’s Writings and Resource Collections I have two personal learning spaces Social Media Listening http://socialmedia-listening.wikispaces.com/ Social Media Metrics Plus you can check out my blog posts on the topic http:// beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/listening /
  • Thank You! Beth’s Blog http://beth.typepad.com Have a blog post topic idea? [email_address]