• Save
League of American Orchestras
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

League of American Orchestras

on

  • 977 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
977
Views on SlideShare
955
Embed Views
22

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 22

http://artssocialmedia.wikispaces.com 22

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Number of Toolshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ebarney/3348965637/sizes/l/Stay standing, listening to what saying about your brandStay standing, promoting your message Twitter, Share this buttonStay standing, participating - deep audience engagement – online/offline, conversation startersStay standing, content strategy for your social channels that is integrated, encouraging user generated content – using mobile, etcStay standing, if you havemeasurement and reflection strategyChallengesStrategyWe don’tNot linked to organizational mission orLack a plan on what to use it for.Content Strategy: Updating and putting only whats relevant on the web.Not having a strategy. We have dabbled but are not focused and do not have a good strategy around how and when we should use it.CapacityStaff and volunteer capacity is currently limited.Time to set-up and maintain the page.Our biggest challenge around using social media is learning how to create more visibility for our agency and programs using existing and new tools, while having limited financial and human resources.Choosing where to focus my energy on. Since small non-profits use a lot of student intern help, how do we chunk out the work so that we can assign tasks to these interns (and not lose control of it)Staff investment in carving out time for social media content.CultureUnderstanding how it can benefit the mission of the organizationDisagreement within the organization on the goals and purpose of adopting social media. Some people are eager to immediately adopt the latest technology, others are cautious.Resistance from executive leadership to use social media based on the risks involved.Lack of Measurement StrategyNo Measurement StrategyFiguring out where to invest timeLearning how to manage it effectively, involving/interesting our elderly clientsHaving time to effectively maximize the use of social media & knowing what are the best tools to utilize.What to post and how often to post.Figuring out whether it really makes a differenceMeasuring results from social media efforts.Updating content often enough - knowing how much is too much or not enough.Prioritization and/or ruling out non-critical stuffStaying relevant - making sure that what we post is valuable, posting frequently, and paying attention to "insights" - do they really matter? I have no idea!
  • If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
  • These are different levels of nonprofit social media practice –They go from beginner to advanceAs you move up and through different levels, you need to invest more time, but you get more returns
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/17657816@N05/1971826491/sizes/l/in/photostream/ResultsIncrease website traffic by 25% by adding social media content starting posting by November 1, 2012. Acquire 100 new donors through Facebook Causes by June 30, 2012Increase email list sign ups through social media channels by 500 names by June 30, 2012Increase the number of gallery visitors who purchase (in person or online) by 20% by June 30, 2012Increase online and print mentions by 25% by June 30, 2012Increase enrollment in classes and workshops by 50% by June 30, 2012Increase exhibition visitors by 15% by June 30, 2012TacticalIncrease audience connections through Facebook to 1000 by June 1, 2012.Increase our month to month Post Feedback on Facebook by 25% on average.Increase mentions by 20% on Twitter before, during, and after performances for 2011Increase views on YouTube Channel by 50% by January, 2012Increase number of retweets and @replies on Twitter by 20% by September, 30, 2011Recruit 40 organizations to join our LinkedIn organization page by June 30, 2012Increase web site traffic from Facebook by 20% by September 30, 2012Utilize Facebook to increase Festival attendance and online program views by 5% by September 2011Identify top 25 influencers on Twitter to build relationships to help blog, repost, and spread the word about online program by September, 30, 2012Increase the age/ethincity/gender/income/geographic of Facebook fans by 20% by June 30, 2012CapacityCreate video trailers for all productions garnering an average of 100 views per trailer for the 2011-2012 programs.Integrate social media across organization staff and departments to use it reach goals by 2012Conduct an audience survey to determine where to expand, grow, and diversify social media presence for 2012Create one video per month to tell stories about the impact of our organization by January, 2012.Recruit 40 organizationStaff members in membership, fundraising, communications, and marketing departments will use social media tools to engage audiences on Facebook page 3 times per week.Conduct surveys at the end of every class and workshop to gather important audience social media usage data and experience with program by June 2012Enhance visual storytelling capacity and diversify type of content shared with a goal increasing videos by 10%, photos by 20% photographic and text that stimulates comments by 20% by August 1, 2012 Create a presence and support active fans on social fundraisings Jumo, Crowdrise, and Change.org by September 30, 2012Create a system to collect, aggregate, and share user generated content on social media by audiences by September 30, 2012
  • Let’s look at the model in terms of tools that you might use at each level …..Ask how many using what tools for each ..
  • IF you’re crawling, raise your handAsk people to share what that looks like and whyIf you’re walking, raise your handAsk people to share what that looks like and whyWho is running?What does that look likeWho is flying?
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
  • donations, leads, new subscribers, increased page rank,Interaction ReputationLoyaltySatisfactionSentimentFeedbackInsights about what worksDonationsLeadsSubscribersMembersSaved Time Saved CostsIncreased page rankSigned petitionsCalls or emails to government officials
  • Our social media strategy focuses on brand awareness and engagement and is part of an integrated communications strategy.    We spend time identifying and building relationships with  super-advocates online and engage them — similar to the way you engage major donors or champion advocacy constituents. “but we are seeing social media become very important in helping with public policy efforts – like the recent Child Nutrition Bill.   We saw a lot of interest and click thrus from Twitter particularly.” They used Google Analytics to see where traffic is coming from specifically to their advocacy pages surrounding the bill and looked at Twitter retweets.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook.A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook.A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • Ethan Allen, orchestra librarian and card-carrying member of the musician’s union, is the administrator of the musicians’ Facebook page. He says that it was a slow process getting their social media presence organized (the musicians also maintain a website and Twitter account), but once they were up and running it became a huge help in their cause. “Television news and newspapers write what they want, mostly one-sided,” says Allen. “Now we were able to get our message out to so many people.”
  • The musicians were able to organize some 15 concerts – some free, some fundraisers, and many of them sellouts. The group mobilized 200 – 300 people to demonstrate at a recent Symphony board meeting. And they were able to shut down many of the ongoing, non-orchestral, programs at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Hall, as many out of town musicians refused to cross the picket line.Clearly, social media has emerged as a powerful mobilizing tool, particularly for issues like labor disputes, where political passions run high.
  • Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • The bitter, six-month strike cancelled 75 percent of the orchestra’s season, and “left deep institutional scars while symbolizing a turbulent era of change and economic uncertainty among American orchestras,” according to the Detroit Free Press. It’s hard not to believe that some of those scars cut deeper because of the widespread use of Facebook as a platform for the debate. The lightening fast, and sometimes anonymous, postings at times seemed to fuel the fire rather than clarify a position.
  • [social media] is a conversation. It’s not a war or a monologue.”When things go wrong – and things will go wrong – Andresen has several rules of thumb that organizations should live by:Listen. Monitor your online presence. Hear what people are saying about you. Use Google Alerts or search Twitter for mentions of your organizationWhen you find something wrong or inaccurate, first look at who’s saying it and how big the audience is. This will help determine if a response is needed.Err on the side of engagement. Act quickly, on the spot, in the same medium where the problem first surfaced.This kind of thinking is a psychological shift for many, says Hoffman of See3 Communications. The use of social media forces nonprofits to engage as a member of a community in a way they may not yet be used to. More and more, constituents and donors expect immediacy and accountability in their relationships to nonprofits.Hoffman says we are living in the age of a new kind of transparency. And this is changing the way organizations need to do business. “People realize that anyone with a phone can do all this!” says Hoffman. Unfortunately, he says, most organizations haven’t caught up with this notion.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarhiccuphiccup/4612331648/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shuri_/5736150735/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/eblingandreas/5382385392/sizes/l/
  • We created a flashmob and promoted it with facebook, youtube, and twitter effectively.  This directly increased our ticket sales.”
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
  • http://disruptology.com/10-social-media-tasks-for-summer-interns/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photohttp://www.slideshare.net/jeremiah_owyang/career-social-strategist?from=embeds/jeremiah_owyang/5162385707/The culture of acompany directly influences how they develop their organizational formation. Weidentified five models for how companies organize for social media, and asked SocialStrategists how they’re currently formed. Nearly 60% of surveyed Social Strategistsclassified their organizational model as “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke”(also known as “Dandelion”), in which a central hub provides guidance, resources andcoordination to business units (See Figure 5). We found that 82% of those in theseorganizational models had reached sophistication, self-identifying their programs asFormalized, Mature, or Advanced. Expect more companies to model in either “Hub andSpoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke,” as these formations are best equipped to scale tomeet demands from both internal and external stakeholders4
  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • Steve Norris, ex-Tory Mayoral contender and adviser to Boris Johnson, says: “Not only do I not want the Southbank Centre to be listed — I think the National Theatre should have a Compulsory Demolition Order!” The Londoner, however, has a soft spot for Sir Denys Lasdun’s National. So there.

League of American Orchestras League of American Orchestras Presentation Transcript

  • Crawl, Walk, Fly, Run:Using Social Media for Good
    Beth Kanter, Zoetica
    MaKala Johnson, Mayo Clinic
    Photo by gwf
  • AGENDA
    1:45-2:15Introduction
    Crawl Walk Run Fly
    2:15-2:35Social Media Policy
    2:35-2:50Doing the Work
    2:50-3:10Learning
    3:10-3:15
    Reflection and Book Raffle
    OUTCOMES
    Leave the room with a basic understanding of effective social media practice and one small step to put into practice
    FRAMING
    • Wide range of experience in the room!
    • Learning from adjacent practices
    • Interactive
    • It’s on the Wiki: http://bit.ly/digital-orch
  • Quick Poll: What is your orchestra’s experience using social media?
  • If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”
    Inspiration
  • Always moving forward ….
    Marketingor Audience Development
    Strategy
    Culture Change
    Social Media Strategy
    SMART Objective
    Audience
    Listening
    Experiments/Pilots
    Integrated Social Media Strategy
    EngagementContent
    Best Practices Tactics
    Capacity
    Integrated and Multiple Channels
    Institutionalized
    Reflection/Improvement
    Network Building
  • Start with a SMART Social Media Objective
  • SMART Social Media Objectives
    1. How many?
    2.By when?
  • IQ TEST: What objective is SMART?
    Recruit 40 organizations to join our LinkedIn organization page by June 30, 2012
    Set up LinkedIn organization page
  • Results
    Acquire 100 new donors through social media channels by June 30, 2012
    Tactical Increase likes and comments with fans on Facebook to 3 comments per post by June 30, 2012
    Capacity
    Create one video per month to tell stories about the impact of our organization by January, 2012.
    Integrate social media across organization staff and board to use it reach goals by September 30, 2012
    Examples: SMART Social Media Objectives
  • BuildNetwork
    Participate
    Listen
    Promote
    Publish
    Low Engagement
    Content Intensive
    No Engagement
    Broadcast/Share
    High Engagement
    Original concept by Beth Kanter – remix by Aliza Sherman
  • Share Pair: Where is your orchestra? What do you need to move forward?
    Strategy
    Measure
    Improve
    Listen
    Participate
    Promote
    Publish
    Network
  • Share Pairs: What’s your organization’s SMART social media objective?
  • What were the results? What’s the value?
    How much time?
    Photo by edyson
  • The Continuum of Value: Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly
    Tangible
    Impact
    $
    Investment
    Interaction
    Insight
    Intangible
    Number of Months Strategy, Measure, Improve
  • Identify Both
  • Goals:1.    To promote Independent Sector with “non-attending audiences” through attendees’ social media mentions2.    To capture summaries of the 2010 conference to show the richness of the content as a means to promote the event for 20113.    To test pilot social media at the conference and to capture lessons learned and ideas for future social media efforts
    Metrics for Success1.    Seven bloggers and seven Tweeters are identified and recruited to cover the event2.    Content from seven sessions is posted to the IS blog or other blogs3.    The number of retweets using the hashtag #ISconf increases from 20094.    The team gains social media  experience and insights about social media practice
    WALK
  • RUN
  • “Facebook is our third biggest referrer of online income. We use Google Analytics (hooked into our online basket) and FB Insights. Many people buy tickets on the phone or in person at the venue and say they heard about on Facebook!”
    "Facebook is just a small piece of my job. I fit in the sort of engagement you see on our page by having set a strategy of treating social media as we would other channel - We would not ignore phone calls, emails or someone talking to us face to face."
  • Social Media strategy is part of integrated communications strategy.
    Track Awareness: Share of Conversion About Hunger
    Conversions for advocacy
    (Child Nutrition Bill) and donations
    Cross Department Dashboard
    KPI: Linked to Job Performance
    FLY
  • Social Media Policy
  • Loss of control over their branding and marketing messages
    Dealing with negative comments
    Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)
    Make mistakes
    Make senior staff too accessible
    Perception of wasted of time and resources
    Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more
  • “The loss of control you fear is already in the past . . . You do not actually control the message, and if you believe you control the message, it merely means you no longer understand what’s going on.”—Clay Shirky, 2010
  • Detroit Symphony Strike: October, 2010
    Musicians
    22% cut
    Management
    33% cut
    Social media provided a twist to the ongoing negotiations between musicians and the DSO
  • A louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate
  • “Television news and newspapers write what they want, mostly one-sided,” says Allen. “Now we were able to get our message out to so many people.” – Ethan Allen, Orchestra Librarian
  • The people formerly known as the audience: “ The rise of social media has completely changed the way an organization like the DSO interacts with its stakeholders.”
  • With a strategy and social media policy, social media can avoid being ….
  • Queen of the Night
    From The Magic Flute
    Flickr photo by sugarhiccuphiccup
  • Black Swan Queen in Swan Lake
    Flickr photo: shuri
  • A well-crafted social media strategy and good practice of networked nonprofits is more like ….
  • Direct impact on ticket sales
  • “We created a flashmob and engaged our networks on Facebook, Youtube, and Twitter effectively.  This directly increased our ticket sales.”
  • The Rule Book: Social Media PolicyTrust is Cheaper than Control
    • Encouragement and support
    • Why policy is needed
    • Cases when it will be used, distributed
    • Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    • Guidelines
    • Identity and transparency
    • Responsibility
    • Confidentiality
    • Judgment and common sense
    • Best practices
    • Tone
    • Expertise
    • Respect
    • Quality
    • Additional resources
    • Training
    • Operational Guidelines
    • Escalation
    • Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com
    Examples: http://www.bethkanter.org/trust-control/
  • Mayo Clinic’s Social Media Policy
  • Release
  • Share Pairs: What does your orchestra need to do to create a social culture and social media policy? If you have a social media policy, what is a best practice?
  • Capacity
  • Who is going to do the work?!
    It’s worth our time, but social media takes time …
  • Build Community
    Participate
    Listen
    Promote
    Publish
    Low Engagement
    Content Intensive
    No Engagement
    Broadcast/Share
    High Engagement
    +
    +
    +
    +
    15 min/day
    20 min/day
    30 min/day
    3-5 hrs/wk
    5-10 hrs/wk
    Original concept by Beth Kanter – remix by Aliza Sherman
  • Three Models
    How does your organization implement social media?
  • Offline
    Online
  • Make them part of your team
    Tasks
    Social Media Overview
    Account Creation/Customization
    Social Media Research
    Template Creation
    Blog Monitoring
    Blog Drafts
    Video
    Post Facebook Content
    Answer comments on Facebook
    Collect measurement data
    Don’t do this to them ….
  • Integrate into job description
  • Wendy Harman
    American Red Cross
    Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training
    Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan
    Get Buy-In from Stakeholders
    Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy
    Gets Tools and Technologies in place
    Facilitate policy and procedures
    Community manager
    Two Full-Time Staff Members
  • Strategy for Scale: Internal/External
  • Mayo Clinic: How is social media implemented?
  • One Minute of Silence: What does your orchestra need to do to increase capacity?
    Flickr Photo by John K
  • Handling Mistakes
    x
    “MisTweet” – A tweet intended to come from a personal account but sent out on an organizational account by mistake.
  • Steve Norris, ex-Tory Mayoral contender, says: “I think the National Theatre should have a Compulsory Demolition Order!”
  • X
  • Two guiding principles in social media are to Be Human and Be Honest. Had the National Theatre adopted either policy, they might have done themselves a service.
  • Has the Mayo Clinic ever made a social media mistake?
  • socialmedia.mayoclinic.org
  • To be successful, use social media like Kanye West
    What can we learned about a try and fix approach to social media from Kanye West?
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Reflection and Book Raffle:
    What is one small step you can take tomorrow?
    Write it on index card with your name and email address
  • Thank you
    Beth’s Blog: http://www.bethkanter.org
    Networked Nonprofit: http://bit.ly/networkednp
    Twitter: @kanter
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/beth.kanter.blog
    Slides and Resources: http://bit.ly/digital-orch