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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/gjw/113093984/
  • As part of my work at the Packard Foundation as visiting scholar, I co-authored a book called the Networked Nonprofit – about how all this connectedness is changing the way that nonprofits do their work – from the inside out. I’ve had the opportunity to teach workshops to ngos all over the world, most recently in the Middle East as part of a state department Civil Society 2.0.
  • A lot of ideas transcend
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words.Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/ounder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile …Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • The transition of how a nonprofit goes from institution to looking like and working more like a network is what our book is aboutThe transition isn’t an easy, flip a switch – and it happens – it takes time Some nonprofits, newer ones like Mom’s Rising have networked nonprofit in their DNA, while others – institutions – make the change slowly.Way of being transforms into a way of doing
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbglasson/3831718364/In the book, we describe two different types of nonprofits – those that born as networked nonprofits and those are in the process of change. We call the latter fortresses. Fortresses work hard to keep their communities and constituents at a distance, pushing out messages and dictating strategy rather than listening or building relationships. Fortress organizations are losing ground today because they spend an extraordinary amount of energy fearing what might happen if they open themselves up to the world. These organizations are floundering in this set-me-free world powered by social media and free agents.This trajectory changes when organizations learn to use social media and actually become their own social networks.
  • Back in 2008, I coined a phrase on my blog, “Free Agent Fundraisers”Definition
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigtallguy/139143816/We wrote this book because we saw a landscape of free agents and nonprofit fortresses crashing into one another ….
  • Take Shawn Ahmed for example ….Shawn Ahmed is 29 year-old Canadian from Toronto and is the founder of the “The Uncultured Project.” He raises money and awareness on the issue of extreme global poverty. He is idealistic, facile with social media and works outside the walls of an institution. He’s passionate about wanted to end global poverty and wants to do it on his terms.But as he acknowledges, that he can’t do it alone.http://www.flickr.com/photos/uncultured/1173511851/
  • The original dispute centered on how deep a pay cut the musicians would have to take to help the struggling symphony balance its budget. The musicians were offering to accept a 22 percent cut, while management sought and then imposed a 33 percent cut.As with most labor disputes passions ran high. There was the typical picketing and demonstrating and the local press followed the story very closely.
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook.A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook.A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook.A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • Ethan Allen, orchestra librarian and card-carrying member of the musician’s union, is the administrator of the musicians’ Facebook page. He says that it was a slow process getting their social media presence organized (the musicians also maintain a website and Twitter account), but once they were up and running it became a huge help in their cause. “Television news and newspapers write what they want, mostly one-sided,” says Allen. “Now we were able to get our message out to so many people.”
  • The musicians were able to organize some 15 concerts – some free, some fundraisers, and many of them sellouts. The group mobilized 200 – 300 people to demonstrate at a recent Symphony board meeting. And they were able to shut down many of the ongoing, non-orchestral, programs at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Hall, as many out of town musicians refused to cross the picket line.Clearly, social media has emerged as a powerful mobilizing tool, particularly for issues like labor disputes, where political passions run high.
  • Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • The bitter, six-month strike cancelled 75 percent of the orchestra’s season, and “left deep institutional scars while symbolizing a turbulent era of change and economic uncertainty among American orchestras,” according to the Detroit Free Press. It’s hard not to believe that some of those scars cut deeper because of the widespread use of Facebook as a platform for the debate. The lightening fast, and sometimes anonymous, postings at times seemed to fuel the fire rather than clarify a position.
  • [social media] is a conversation. It’s not a war or a monologue.”When things go wrong – and things will go wrong – Andresen has several rules of thumb that organizations should live by:Listen. Monitor your online presence. Hear what people are saying about you. Use Google Alerts or search Twitter for mentions of your organizationWhen you find something wrong or inaccurate, first look at who’s saying it and how big the audience is. This will help determine if a response is needed.Err on the side of engagement. Act quickly, on the spot, in the same medium where the problem first surfaced.This kind of thinking is a psychological shift for many, says Hoffman of See3 Communications. The use of social media forces nonprofits to engage as a member of a community in a way they may not yet be used to. More and more, constituents and donors expect immediacy and accountability in their relationships to nonprofits.Hoffman says we are living in the age of a new kind of transparency. And this is changing the way organizations need to do business. “People realize that anyone with a phone can do all this!” says Hoffman. Unfortunately, he says, most organizations haven’t caught up with this notion.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarhiccuphiccup/4612331648/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shuri_/5736150735/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/eblingandreas/5382385392/sizes/l/
  • We created a flashmob and promoted it with facebook, youtube, and twitter effectively.  This directly increased our ticket sales.”
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/antydiluvian/320947237/sizes/o/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/antydiluvian/320947237/sizes/o/

French Orchestra Association French Orchestra Association Presentation Transcript

  • The Networked Orchestra
    Beth Kanter
    Photo by gwf
  • French Orchestra Association: Networked Orchestra: Leading and Connecting in an Age of Social Media
    AGENDA
    OUTCOMES
    Leave the room with a basic understanding of the Networked Orchestra and one small step tomorrow
    Introduction
    Connectedness can be your friend
    Networked Nonprofit
    Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly
    A Few Principles
    FRAMING
    • Lost in Translation
    • Learning from adjacent practices
    • Interactive
    • http://bit.ly/fr-orch
  • Networked Nonprofits
  • “When the technology becomes boring, it becomes socially interesting …” Clay Shirky
    The connectedness of living in a networked, mobile world has become more a part our daily lives.
    These disruptive technologies are having a profound impact on the way arts organizations do their work, communicate with audiences, and programs.
    Remember: Disruption is can be our friend …..
  • What is a Networked Nonprofit?
  • The Networked Nonprofit
  • The Nonprofit Fortress
    The Nonprofit Fortress
    Photo by rbglasson
  • Use social media tools to organize, mobilize, raise funds, and communicate with audiences but outside of institutional walls
  • Nonprofit Fortress
    Free Agent
  • Shawn AhmedFree Agent
  • Ecosystem of Free Agents
    Grace raised $1,400 for wildlife. They met her mom on Twitter.
  • “The loss of control you fear is already in the past . . . You do not actually control the message, and if you believe you control the message, it merely means you no longer understand what’s going on.”—Clay Shirky, 2010
  • Detroit Symphony Strike: October, 2010
    Management
    33% cut
    Musicians
    22% cut
  • Social media provided a twist to the ongoing negotiations between musicians and the DSO
  • A louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate
  • A torrent of vitriolic Facebookupdates as the two sides could not come to agreement ….
  • Had the Symphony lots its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community?
  • “Television news and newspapers write what they want, mostly one-sided,” says Allen. “Now we were able to get our message out to so many people.” – Ethan Allen, Orchestra Librarian
  • The people formerly known as the audience: “ The rise of social media has completely changed the way an organization like the DSO interacts with its stakeholders.”
  • Social media is here to stay and nonprofits have to understand how to manage this new form of communication for audiences and stakeholders.
    But it doesn’t have to be ……
  • Queen of the Night
    From The Magic Flute
    Flickr photo by sugarhiccuphiccup
  • Black Swan Queen in Swan Lake
    Flickr photo: shuri
  • A well-crafted social media strategy and good practice of networked nonprofits more like ….
  • Direct impact on ticket sales
  • “We created a flashmob and promoted it with facebook, youtube, and twitter effectively.  This directly increased our ticket sales.”
  • The Networked Nonprofit: Maturity of Practice Model
  • Always moving forward in social media practice….
    Integrated Social Media Strategy
    EngagementIntegrated Content
    Best Practices Tactics
    Build Capacity
    Multiple Channels
    Institutionalized
    Network Building
    Measurement/KPI
    Reflection/Improvement
    Marketingor Audience Development
    Plan
    Culture Change
    Social Media Strategy
    SMART Objectives
    Audience
    Listening
    Experiments/Pilots
    Maturity of Practice Model: Beth Kanter : http:www.bethkanter.org/c-w-r-f
  • A few principles of practice ……
  • Social Culture
  • Loss of control over their branding and marketing messages
    Dealing with negative comments
    Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)
    Make mistakes
    Make senior staff too accessible
    Perception of wasted of time and resources
    Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more
  • Codifying A Social Culture: Policy
    • Encouragement and support
    • Why policy is needed
    • Cases when it will be used, distributed
    • Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    • Guidelines
    • Identity and transparency
    • Responsibility
    • Confidentiality
    • Judgment and common sense
    • Best practices
    • Tone
    • Expertise
    • Respect
    • Quality
    • Additional resources
    • Training
    • Operational Guidelines
    • Escalation
    • Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com
    Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group
  • How are you encouraging your audiences to connect and engage with your organization and artistic programs, linking offline/online?
  • Flickr photo by antydiluvian
  • Participate: Encourages the audiences to engage with them before, during, and after arts experience …
  • You want me to start Tweeting too?
    From scarcity to abundance …
  • Who will do the work?
  • Want to see the video?
    Volunteers and Interns
  • Integrate into job description
  • Wendy Harman
    Director, Social Media
    Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training
    Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan
    Get Buy-In from Stakeholders
    Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy
    Gets Tools and Technologies in place
    Facilitate policy and procedures
    Community manager
    Two Full-Time Staff Members
  • To be successful, use social media like Kanye West
    What can we learned about a try and fix approach to social media from Kanye West?
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Source: @clairew
  • Thank you
    Beth’s Blog: http://www.bethkanter.org
    Twitter: @kanter
    Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/beth.kanter.blog