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  • Full Group Debrief: (7 minutes)What are some of your key reflections from yesterday?What are you most curious about learning today? Photo by: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ninjawil/2205949982/We are all participating an intense multi-day training. The morning after is a great time to generate “overnight reflections” about new insights from the previous day. We are also going to have you continue to practice your Twitter skills by taking twitter breaks to tweet your reflections using the hashtag #netngopk Agenda Review (3 minutes)
  • 3 min
  • 30 minutesWhat is the wiki?How we are using it to support the projectExpectationsTour of the WikiHow to set up an accountHow to edit your journal page
  • http://on.fb.me/netngopkBeth, I think we decided to invite the India group into this. If I’m wrong, let me know and I’ll start a new group.
  • Goal: To be able to draw make connections from previous successful communications and link to social media strategyIcebreaker: Your most effective overall communications campaign – what made it work?
  • http://www.momsrising.org/MomsRising is one of the best living examples of a nonprofit born as Networked Nonprofit, a  simple, agile, and transparent organization that work more like a network than a single isolated institution.   Like all Networked Nonprofits,  Momsrising values simplicity and the ability to leverage its network while engaging and building relationships with people and organizations to get results.It comes as no surprise that Momsrising embraces measurement and learning.  It is embedded in the way they work and their organizational culture. It has fueled their growth from zero members in May of 2006, to over a million active members—moms, dads, grandparents, aunts, and uncles—today! And, they do not count “likes” on Facebook as victory.   Instead, they identify key organizational results areas and associated metrics to define successes and failures.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Their key results generally include:• increasing the movement size by increasing membership• garnering attention from all media through creative engagements• getting policies passed• working with aligned partner organizations• increasing capacity
  • They know that to get results they cannot solely rely on social media tools.  They use results as a guide for designing and implementing rapid responses as part of their multi-channel citizen engagement campaigns. They know how to gain attention in an age of media clutter and overload …. The importance of having an “integrated strategy” The media landscape today consists of four domains Traditional media …. (such as CNN, NY Times)Tradigital media … (includes mostly blogs with a lot of authority like the Huffington Post)Owned Media …. (this is your organization’s web site)Social Media … which includes social networks like Facebook, Twitter – increasingly being accessed on mobile devices What’s interesting is that the consumer does not make the distinction – they may get their news from reading a friend’s newsfeed or hear it on NPR or follow NPR on Facebook or get email alerts, etc.Momsrising has done a great job of this … they engage people and encourage them to share their stories – and they in turn share those stories through all four domains.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Take for example how they responded over the summer to the ongoing budget negotiations, when  tens of billions of dollars in cuts to Medicaid and Medicare were put on the table.Momsrising wanted to demonstrate to Congress that there was a grassroots constituency that supported Medicaid and dispel a misperception that while Medicare has a strong constituency, Medicaid did not.
  • Momsrising knows from years of message testing and research, that to change minds about an issue, wonky stats fall flat.   But stories resonate.   They identified a rapid response goal of getting the stories dozens of moms who benefited from Medicaid and who could put out a strong defense for the program in the media.Using a story collection landing page on their site, they urged their members to share their stories.   They collected over 500 stories from 43 states about how Medicaid was helping families.   They curated the best ones that illustrated their message and re-purposed these stories in to all their action alerts across channels.  This generated over 100,000 letters to Congress about the debt ceiling and the importance of Medcaid.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/Notes Kristen, “Social Media channels like Twitter and Facebook are important to us because we share those stories directly with targeted members of Congress. We post specific stories on targeted legislator’s Facebook Walls or we @reply them on Twitter. We’ve found that there are less filters between us and Congress when we use social media channels. While they can easily ignore our emails and phone calls, sharing the story directly with them through social media channels – they have to respond.”   Recent studies have shown that 64% of  Congressional offices use social media to gauge public opinion.)Another key result area is to bring about policy change to create a more family-friendly nation.  Last month, Momsrising was invited tobring moms to the White House to talk with policy staff about their experience with Medicaid.   The White House  blogged about power of people’s stories.
  • They also place these stories as letters to the editors in traditional newspapers.  
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150249212856610&set=a.10150249212851610.322274.8321461609&type=1Masters of the multi-channel approach, Momsrising’s other tactics included hand delivering “story books”, hard copy compilations of the stories to Congress and the White House.  
  • As a Networked Nonprofit, they understand  simplicity and have not built a complex nonprofit with its own policy department.   Momsrising  focuses on what they do best – outreach and organizing moms – but not in isolation.   Momsrising  works with dozens of advocacy groups to extend their network without pulling themselves off task. Kristin said, “Our expertise is in working with our moments and powering the movement.  We don’t go out on anything solo, we rely on partners for policy analysis and many other things.”
  • Image: http://www.blurgroup.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/twitter-vector-icon.gif / http://www.blurgroup.com/blog/tag/twitter
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • It takes a unique person to recognize the correlation between adding personality to Facebook posts and an increase in exhibit attendance, but that is exactly what Lisa Leong, Program Manager at the Kearny Street Workshop (KSW), discovered as she poured over her monthly social media metrics spreadsheet. She regularly analyzed all the comments on KSW’s Facebook page and categorized them by topic. She compared those results to her Facebook Insights metrics to figure out what content resonated with their audience. “Who knew we could inspire all those online conversations about our artists, just by adding a bit of our own personality to our posts?” KSW’s mission is to produce, present, and promote art that empowers Asian American artists and communities. Founded in 1972 in San Francisco's Chinatown/Manilatown, its artistic programs both honor the community’s cultural heritage and nurture emerging artists and contemporary practices. The organization offers educational workshops, performances, and exhibitions that showcase stories of diverse individuals and communities in the Bay Area. It uses its website, email, print, local, and ethnic media channels to promote its programs. It had recently started to experiment with social media.Like any good measurement maven, Leong started out with clear objectives. “Our goal was to increase awareness, engagement, and participation in our programs both for audiences and artists. But we are a small nonprofit, with a two-person staff,” Lisa explained. “I am the social media manager, but it isn’t 100% of my job. We started with identifying our objectives and metrics that would help us improve our content and engagement strategy.
  • Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use best practices to:We tracked results by collecting several metrics from Facebook Insights, tracking participation in our events, and by adding some questions to our event surveys.” Their goals and metrics were: Increase exposure as measured by the number of likes on Facebook.TOOL: Facebook InsightsRESULT: We increased our fan base by 72% Increaseengagement by doubling comments/likes per post.TOOL: Facebook Insights RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%Increase participation of new people in classes and events.TOOL: Event Survey RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through Facebook“We had to think carefully about the workflow,” Lisa adds. “I spend an hour a month planning our editorial calendar with my executive director. It’s a simple spreadsheet that lists the different types of content, topics, and, of course, our success metrics. We look at that data to help us make more effective decisions the next month. In addition, I spend two hours per week on social media. I gather my data weekly so it isn’t overwhelming.”
  • Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use best practices to:We tracked results by collecting several metrics from Facebook Insights, tracking participation in our events, and by adding some questions to our event surveys.” Their goals and metrics were: Increase exposure as measured by the number of likes on Facebook.TOOL: Facebook InsightsRESULT: We increased our fan base by 72% Increaseengagement by doubling comments/likes per post.TOOL: Facebook Insights RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%Increase participation of new people in classes and events.TOOL: Event Survey RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through Facebook“We had to think carefully about the workflow,” Lisa adds. “I spend an hour a month planning our editorial calendar with my executive director. It’s a simple spreadsheet that lists the different types of content, topics, and, of course, our success metrics. We look at that data to help us make more effective decisions the next month. In addition, I spend two hours per week on social media. I gather my data weekly so it isn’t overwhelming.”
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • During workshop 2, you learned how to set up a couple of simple tools to monitor and track what people are saying about you and create a simple dashboard on iGoogle or NetVibes – like this example for a conference.This was a conference that was using a hashtag and they wanted to track who was talking about the conference before, during, and after and to be able to respond.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Wildlife SOS was established in 1995 by a small group of individuals inspired to start a movement and make lasting change to protect and conserve India's natural heritage, forests and wildlife wealth. Today, the organization has evolved to actively work towards protecting the Indian wildlife, conserving habitat, studying biodiversity, conducting research and creating alternative and sustainable livelihoods for erstwhile poacher communities.If you look at the web site, blog, Facebook, and Twitter – you’ll see that the content relates to their mission and is coordinated and connected.
  • Gawaahi collaborates and uses various forms of media and campaigns to reach different audiences and deliver various messages. All of those messages are aligned with their mission that aims to archive digital stories of abuse, survival and resistance. They are interactive – have conversations with their audience + policy makers. Engaging - They welcome people to participate & join them at offline events. Relationships – They maintain integrity in maintaining someone’s anonymity if necessary.Integrated – They are well integrated between their website, blog, YouTube, Facebook & offline
  • The website makes it easy for the visitor to connect on other platforms and see how they are taking specific actions within their objectives. They thank people for stopping by and acknowledge contributors/supporters.
  • You can get started with curating on your organization social media presences – like Facebook or blogging. This example is from Twitter.Bruce Lesley is the CEO of Children First an child welfare organization. His curates content on his personal Twitter profile. He uses Twitter to curate information related to his organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions. He also uses content curation for sources for his guest blogging.  His use of Twitter (and his organization’s use of Twitter and all communications channels for that matter) serve this intent:First Focus is working to change the dialogue around children’s issues by taking a cross-cutting and broad based approach to federal policy making. In all of our work, we seek to raise awareness regarding public policies impacting children and ensure that related programs have the resources necessary to help them grow up in a healthy and nurturing environment.If you take a look at Bruce Lesley’s Twitter stream, you will see that he is curating information on public policies impacting children. Bruce does his own curating, using Google Reader and FlipBoard.  Any individual or nonprofit organization can curate information using these tools.  They can make it strategic by linking the information to their mission.  We are going to have a session this afternoon that will tell you more about how to do content curation.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • This story is about a large NGO but your organization doesn’t have to be large to use these techniques.USA for UNHCR  is a 501(c)(3) headquartered in Washington, D.C. They raise funds and awareness in the United States for the lifesaving work that more than 6,000 staffers of Geneva-based UNHCR undertake for refugees around the world, 24/7.   USA for UNHCR created the Blue Key campaign as a way to drive awareness of this global issue in the US. The $5 blue key pin or pendant symbolizes the one thing most of us have and that refugees don’t: a key to their own home.The Blue Key site was only launched in December 2010, and its social/digital aspects were relatively new, so there was not a lot of data to base KPIs on. Overall, when we went into the first phase of the campaign, we had two goals: to secure at least three Blue Key Champions, and  to get 6,000 keys ordered between May 9 and June 20 (World Refugee Day).These goals were important to USA for UNHCR first, because the entire Blue Key campaign revolves around more people purchasing keys, and second, because with a limited budget for traditional outreach, they relied on willing bloggers to help us get the word out.They recruited bloggers who write about this topic. They set up a private FB group to communicate with them and coordinate the campaign, share content, etc.
  • They organized a “Tweetathon” – an online event on Twitter. They asked their Champions signed up to tweetabout the refugee crisis and #bluekey (the campaign hashtag) from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. on World Refugee Day In addition, RoyaHosseini, who manages the KhaledHosseini Foundation’s Twitter account, signed on as a “special guest” between 1 & 2 p.m. (KhaledHosseini is the author ofThe Kite Runner.)Each of their Champions helped get the message about the campaign out to their networks and it was very efficient and effective for the organizations.All told, there was a 169% increase in web traffic that day, compared to the previous high point a few weeks prior. We get real time confirmations every time someone orders a key, so we knew it was working. Finally, via campaign URLs in Google Analytics, we saw that Twitter was the main driver of traffic (for May 9 – June 20). This was not the case before the tweetathon.
  • Brand champions are people who are the most passionate about your work that you’ve been able to connect with through social media channels or even offline. Influencers are people who other people listen to and are associated with your topic or field. These can be experts, well-known people, or people who have done a lot of work in this subject matter area.You probably already know who your champions are offline and it is fairly easy to identify them online as well. Who is responding to you on Facebook or your blog? Do you know them? Recognize them and then developed a formal way to work with them.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • In 2006, Sameer Bhatia, a Stanford University undergrad-turned-entrepreneur of South Asian heritage, was diagnosed with leukemia. Leukemia is cancer of the blood or bone marrow, and, for some individuals, the only possible form of treatment is to have a bone marrow transplant. In order to get a transplant, a patient must find someone who’s tissue type matches the patient’s as closely as possible. Thirty percent of patients in search of a bone marrow donor find a match within their immediate family. But for the other seventy percent, the only option is to turn to bone marrow registries. All that is required to register as a potential bone marrow donor is a swab of one’ cheek, but there are extreme shortages of donors from ethnically diverse communities. After not finding a match within his family, Sameer’s chances of finding a potential donor were miniscule. What were they? One in 20,000.100K Cheeks: The Power of Harnessing the CrowdAfter hearing of his diagnosis, Bhatia’s friends at Stanford University, lead by VineetSingal, were inspired to start a student-run organization called 100K Cheeks. 100K Cheeks is dedicated to recruiting 100,000 new registrants into the National Marrow Donor Program using social media and on-the-ground tactics. By increasing the availability of donors this project can potentially save thousands of lives. While Bhatia passed away in 2008, the campaign was not in vain. In 11 weeks, Bhatias supporters recruited 24,611 South Asians into the bone marrow registry and found a match for him and Vinay, another South Asian diagnosed with leukemia. The 7,500 people who registered in the San Francisco Bay Area, where Sameer and Vinay lived, yielded 80 matches for other leukemia patients, an unintended but celebrated consequence. Overall, of the 24,611 new people who registered, 266 were matches for patients in the first year. This effort prompted VineetSingal, Stanford Professor Jennifer Aaker, and a team of students to join forces with the Haas Center and other partners to implement a large-scale bone marrow registration drive that harnessed the power of social media and crowdsourcing by making an open call for ideas and assistance.Says Vineet, “Our hope is to solve the burning problem of a lack of donors (especially from South Asian and other ethnicities) in the bone marrow registry in the United States and even in countries like India and Indonesia. We also hope to educate people about how, thanks to new technologies, bone marrow donation is not dissimilar to blood donation. Over the past year, I have had the honor and privilege of leading a truly remarkable team of student volunteers.”And they’ve gotten results. By 2011, they had inspired 100,000 people to swab their cheek and register as potential donors in the National Bone Marrow Registry. How did they do this? They ran a crowdsourcing campaign on OpenIDEO, an online platform that engages creative and passionate problem solvers from around the world and all walks of life to solve social and environmental challenges 290 Ideas from People in 175 CountriesIn March, 2011, the OpenIDEO platform encouraged everyone and anyone to participate in contributing ideas for 100K Cheeks.The 100K Cheeks Team and their partners reached out to their networks using social media and mainstream press to encourage participation. Individuals were invited to contribute in a variety of different ways, from inspirational observations, photos, and sketches of ideas, to business models and snippets of code. Some contributions came in the form of comments, while others built off a previous contributor’s work. As Vineet notes, “We learned that there are barriers to bone marrow donation, including people’s fear of needles and a misunderstanding of the donation process, and we used crowdsourcing to overcome those barriers.” 100K Cheeks is also assisting individual patient campaigns, including the recent “Amit Gupta Needs You” campaign. 100K Cheeks is collaborating with DoSomething.org on the “Give A Spit About Cancer” Campaign to inspire college students on campuses around the country to act.100K Cheeks Measures the CrowdThe 100K Cheeks team met their goal of adding 100K potential donors into the National Marrow Donor Program. But their ultimate impact will be the number of lives saved by transplants found by matches in the registry. Could they have done it without crowdsourcing? It’s difficult to prove exactly how many of those 100K were recruited thanks to the crowd, there is no doubt that the technique provided tangible value. In total, 100K Cheeks received 290 ideas from people in 175 countries. From these, the team synthesized the best concepts into ten ideas that they have used to guide their strategy.The benefits of crowdsourcing have been two-fold: They’ve gotten more ideas on how to reach their goals, and have also begun to build a global movement around this important issue.Through the power of crowdsourcing, 100K Cheeks was able to save on the costs of hiring outside consultants to generate ideas, do research, and provide strategy suggestions. One invaluable yet difficult-to-value innovation that emerged from the OpenIDEO challenge was “Swab Parties,” swab-testing events to which individuals invited their friends to get tested and register. Previously, calls to action had been made to inspire individuals to register, but these Tupperware-style Swab Parties dramatically increased the effectiveness of the project by registering groups of people at one time.Aaker, Jennifer and Smith, Andy. [September, 2010}. The story of Sameer and Vinay [blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.dragonflyeffect.com/blog/dragonfly-in-action/case-studies/the-story-of-sameer-and-vinay/Aaker, Jennifer and Veneet, Singal, private email correspondence with Beth Kanter, October, 2011Open Ideo. (December, 2011) Bone Marrow Donor Challenge [Web site]. Retrieved from http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/brief.html http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/winners-announced/swab-parties-on-the-basis-of-tupperware-parties/
  • 100K Cheeks: The Power of Harnessing the CrowdSays Vineet, “Our hope is to solve the burning problem of a lack of donors (especially from South Asian and other ethnicities) in the bone marrow registry in the United States and even in countries like India and Indonesia. We also hope to educate people about how, thanks to new technologies, bone marrow donation is not dissimilar to blood donation. Over the past year, I have had the honor and privilege of leading a truly remarkable team of student volunteers.”And they’ve gotten results. By 2011, they had inspired 100,000 people to swab their cheek and register as potential donors in the National Bone Marrow Registry. How did they do this? They ran a crowdsourcing campaign on OpenIDEO, an online platform that engages creative and passionate problem solvers from around the world and all walks of life to solve social and environmental challenges 290 Ideas from People in 175 CountriesIn March, 2011, the OpenIDEO platform encouraged everyone and anyone to participate in contributing ideas for 100K Cheeks.The 100K Cheeks Team and their partners reached out to their networks using social media and mainstream press to encourage participation. Individuals were invited to contribute in a variety of different ways, from inspirational observations, photos, and sketches of ideas, to business models and snippets of code. Some contributions came in the form of comments, while others built off a previous contributor’s work. As Vineet notes, “We learned that there are barriers to bone marrow donation, including people’s fear of needles and a misunderstanding of the donation process, and we used crowdsourcing to overcome those barriers.” 100K Cheeks is also assisting individual patient campaigns, including the recent “Amit Gupta Needs You” campaign. 100K Cheeks is collaborating with DoSomething.org on the “Give A Spit About Cancer” Campaign to inspire college students on campuses around the country to act.100K Cheeks Measures the CrowdThe 100K Cheeks team met their goal of adding 100K potential donors into the National Marrow Donor Program. But their ultimate impact will be the number of lives saved by transplants found by matches in the registry. Could they have done it without crowdsourcing? It’s difficult to prove exactly how many of those 100K were recruited thanks to the crowd, there is no doubt that the technique provided tangible value. In total, 100K Cheeks received 290 ideas from people in 175 countries. From these, the team synthesized the best concepts into ten ideas that they have used to guide their strategy.The benefits of crowdsourcing have been two-fold: They’ve gotten more ideas on how to reach their goals, and have also begun to build a global movement around this important issue.Through the power of crowdsourcing, 100K Cheeks was able to save on the costs of hiring outside consultants to generate ideas, do research, and provide strategy suggestions. One invaluable yet difficult-to-value innovation that emerged from the OpenIDEO challenge was “Swab Parties,” swab-testing events to which individuals invited their friends to get tested and register. Previously, calls to action had been made to inspire individuals to register, but these Tupperware-style Swab Parties dramatically increased the effectiveness of the project by registering groups of people at one time.Aaker, Jennifer and Smith, Andy. [September, 2010}. The story of Sameer and Vinay [blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.dragonflyeffect.com/blog/dragonfly-in-action/case-studies/the-story-of-sameer-and-vinay/Aaker, Jennifer and Veneet, Singal, private email correspondence with Beth Kanter, October, 2011Open Ideo. (December, 2011) Bone Marrow Donor Challenge [Web site]. Retrieved from http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/brief.html http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/winners-announced/swab-parties-on-the-basis-of-tupperware-parties/
  • In 2006, Sameer Bhatia, a Stanford University undergrad-turned-entrepreneur of South Asian heritage, was diagnosed with leukemia. Leukemia is cancer of the blood or bone marrow, and, for some individuals, the only possible form of treatment is to have a bone marrow transplant. In order to get a transplant, a patient must find someone who’s tissue type matches the patient’s as closely as possible. Thirty percent of patients in search of a bone marrow donor find a match within their immediate family. But for the other seventy percent, the only option is to turn to bone marrow registries. All that is required to register as a potential bone marrow donor is a swab of one’ cheek, but there are extreme shortages of donors from ethnically diverse communities. After not finding a match within his family, Sameer’s chances of finding a potential donor were miniscule. What were they? One in 20,000.100K Cheeks: The Power of Harnessing the CrowdAfter hearing of his diagnosis, Bhatia’s friends at Stanford University, lead by VineetSingal, were inspired to start a student-run organization called 100K Cheeks. 100K Cheeks is dedicated to recruiting 100,000 new registrants into the National Marrow Donor Program using social media and on-the-ground tactics. By increasing the availability of donors this project can potentially save thousands of lives. While Bhatia passed away in 2008, the campaign was not in vain. In 11 weeks, Bhatias supporters recruited 24,611 South Asians into the bone marrow registry and found a match for him and Vinay, another South Asian diagnosed with leukemia. The 7,500 people who registered in the San Francisco Bay Area, where Sameer and Vinay lived, yielded 80 matches for other leukemia patients, an unintended but celebrated consequence. Overall, of the 24,611 new people who registered, 266 were matches for patients in the first year. This effort prompted VineetSingal, Stanford Professor Jennifer Aaker, and a team of students to join forces with the Haas Center and other partners to implement a large-scale bone marrow registration drive that harnessed the power of social media and crowdsourcing by making an open call for ideas and assistance.Says Vineet, “Our hope is to solve the burning problem of a lack of donors (especially from South Asian and other ethnicities) in the bone marrow registry in the United States and even in countries like India and Indonesia. We also hope to educate people about how, thanks to new technologies, bone marrow donation is not dissimilar to blood donation. Over the past year, I have had the honor and privilege of leading a truly remarkable team of student volunteers.”And they’ve gotten results. By 2011, they had inspired 100,000 people to swab their cheek and register as potential donors in the National Bone Marrow Registry. How did they do this? They ran a crowdsourcing campaign on OpenIDEO, an online platform that engages creative and passionate problem solvers from around the world and all walks of life to solve social and environmental challenges 290 Ideas from People in 175 CountriesIn March, 2011, the OpenIDEO platform encouraged everyone and anyone to participate in contributing ideas for 100K Cheeks.The 100K Cheeks Team and their partners reached out to their networks using social media and mainstream press to encourage participation. Individuals were invited to contribute in a variety of different ways, from inspirational observations, photos, and sketches of ideas, to business models and snippets of code. Some contributions came in the form of comments, while others built off a previous contributor’s work. As Vineet notes, “We learned that there are barriers to bone marrow donation, including people’s fear of needles and a misunderstanding of the donation process, and we used crowdsourcing to overcome those barriers.” 100K Cheeks is also assisting individual patient campaigns, including the recent “Amit Gupta Needs You” campaign. 100K Cheeks is collaborating with DoSomething.org on the “Give A Spit About Cancer” Campaign to inspire college students on campuses around the country to act.100K Cheeks Measures the CrowdThe 100K Cheeks team met their goal of adding 100K potential donors into the National Marrow Donor Program. But their ultimate impact will be the number of lives saved by transplants found by matches in the registry. Could they have done it without crowdsourcing? It’s difficult to prove exactly how many of those 100K were recruited thanks to the crowd, there is no doubt that the technique provided tangible value. In total, 100K Cheeks received 290 ideas from people in 175 countries. From these, the team synthesized the best concepts into ten ideas that they have used to guide their strategy.The benefits of crowdsourcing have been two-fold: They’ve gotten more ideas on how to reach their goals, and have also begun to build a global movement around this important issue.Through the power of crowdsourcing, 100K Cheeks was able to save on the costs of hiring outside consultants to generate ideas, do research, and provide strategy suggestions. One invaluable yet difficult-to-value innovation that emerged from the OpenIDEO challenge was “Swab Parties,” swab-testing events to which individuals invited their friends to get tested and register. Previously, calls to action had been made to inspire individuals to register, but these Tupperware-style Swab Parties dramatically increased the effectiveness of the project by registering groups of people at one time.Aaker, Jennifer and Smith, Andy. [September, 2010}. The story of Sameer and Vinay [blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.dragonflyeffect.com/blog/dragonfly-in-action/case-studies/the-story-of-sameer-and-vinay/Aaker, Jennifer and Veneet, Singal, private email correspondence with Beth Kanter, October, 2011Open Ideo. (December, 2011) Bone Marrow Donor Challenge [Web site]. Retrieved from http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/brief.html http://www.openideo.com/open/how-might-we-increase-the-number-of-bone-marrow-donors-to-help-save-more-lives/winners-announced/swab-parties-on-the-basis-of-tupperware-parties/
  • How can your NGO integrate social media tasks into staff’s work flow? How would you divide the work?
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • grist.org is a Seattle-based nonprofit that supports a destination news website for environmental news, reports, and opinion with a wry sense of humor. Chip Giller launched grist.org in 1999 to counter the stereotype that all environmentalists were either dour doomsayers or holier-than-thou tree-huggers. grist.org’s editorial mission is to publish a new, positive form of green journalism with a comical twist. The vision is to spread independent environmental online content free of charge to a young and growing readership. grist.org reports on everything from climate change to the organic food movement, demonstrating how the environment intersects with critical issues like poverty, health care, and economic growth. What started as a quirky website with a hundred readers has grown to a leading news source that engages millions who might otherwise be turned off by the-bummer-of-the-day environmental news.Grist.org Uses Measurement to Learn How to Deepen Relationshipsgrist.org has succeeded in connecting with a younger audience that not only reads its content but is also inspired to take action. It has accomplished this by using measurement to learn what it takes to move readers from being passive consumers of content to taking offline action. grist.org operates on a modest budget but is highly effective at uncovering real meaning behind green stories and connecting big issues like climate change to daily life. While grist.org constantly attracts new readers, these are not the passive consumers typical of most media. They engage in the comments, share their own stories, take action, and, more importantly, are changing their personal behavior to benefit the environment and, ultimately, to save the planet. Grist.org Builds Its Own Ladder of Engagementgrist.org is a data-informed organization that uses a ladder of engagement not only to guide its content and social media integration strategy, but uses measurement at each rung of the ladder to ensure that they are getting results.
  • grist.org’s ladder of engagement is elegantly simple and illustrates how their audience makes the journey from passive consumers of information to sustainable living champions, see Figure 6.2. The steps include fun on-ramps, sharing stories of personal behavior change, personal calls to action, and calls to action on policy change. grist.org does not consider pageviews or other web traffic stats the end point, but only an indicator of success at the bottom rung of their ladder. Their real goal is higher up the ladder, and that is societal change. If they aren’t successful, the consequences are dire. Or as Giller says, “The planet will get it.” grist.org’s key results are:  Footprint: The reach of their activities, both online and offline.Engagement: How readers engage with their content by commenting, contributing content, and sharing their content with other people.Individual Behavior Change: Impact on users behaviors, including purchase decisions and daily routines that advance sustainable practices.Societal Change: Impact on society, policy discussions, and conversations that advance sustainable practices.  Grist.org’s Measurement: Engagement, Indices, Surveysgrist.org uses a combination of tools to measure along the ladder of engagement, including Google Analytics, surveys, real-time monitoring tools, and collecting anecdotal stories.
  • So I wanted to walk you through a few experiments we have been doing—specifically on Twitter.The first was based on a piece that Tom Philpott wrote about all of the horrific things in soda. We saw huge traction on this story and decided to jump on an opportunity.So within less than 24 hours we convened a twitter chat.I am sure most of you heard about the Obama twitter chat at the beginning of the month—basically they revolve around a hashtag where people can tweet questions, answers, comments. The cool thing is when people tweet to this hashtag, it shows up in their feed. So all of their followers see it and can get hooked into the content—it creates a resonance that doesn’t happen as easily via email, etc. So with a few hundred tweets to this chat, we actually reached 100s of thousands of people.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Handout exercise sheet info35 minutes Ask participants to pair up by organization discuss their most effective communications strategy or campaign. What did they do in the planning or implementation that lead to the success? What’s needed for success? What is the definition of success? (10 minutes)Ask each person then writes down on three index cards or index card size sticky notes phrases or elements of successful communications strategy with their name and organization. (3 minutes) Facilitator gathers index cards/sticky notes and randomly distributes two cards to each participant – leaving 16 on the table or puts sticky notes on the wall. (2 minutes)Participants need to circulate and gather, exchange, steal, or take sticky notes left on the table or the wall until they each end up with three index cards that match their experience. (5 minutes)Each organizational pair reports out on their phrases – facilitator summarizes, co-trainer flip charts. (15 minutes)Summary: A social media strategy is most effective when integrated in your overall communications strategy – we call this “Multi-channel” – Knowing the definition for success and what works will help your social media be more effective. Twitter Break
  • Images are all of Pakistani’s. The “Fly” is ofThe “Fly” is famous Bollywood actor Shan Rukh Khan photo: ibtimes.comWe have discussed what success looks like and what’s needed for an overall communications strategy. We understand that social media needs to be aligned with overall communications strategy to be successful. And, we’ve reviewed what makes social media use effective. . Now, let’s look at where your organizations are and then compare them to the “Maturity of Practice Model”.
  • A Images are all of Pakistani’s. The “Fly” is famous Bollywood actor Shan Rukh Khanphoto: ibtimes.comCrawl, Walk, Run, Fly Model: There are four different levels of social media maturity of practice. These are classified as “Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly.” One level is not better than another, it is just where the organization is at in its social media usage. 10 minutes - Be aware, that it takes months if not years to reach the highest level of practice. Not every nonprofit will go through the levels at the same pace due to organizational culture, capacity, or communications objectives and target audiences. The goal of training and technical assistance is to help NGOs improve by getting to the next level. If they can’t fly, then run. If they can’t run, then walk. If they can’t walk, then crawl. The idea is to keep improving.
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • Song to play coming in from break - 1947 - A Song by Mehdi Maloof - http://www.talentidols.com/mehdiCampfire Stories (50 minutes)Framing: One of the great things about social media is that it is relatively new and we’re all learning in real-time. As we pointed in the principles, learning from other NGOs is a best practice. So, we’re going to share some stories.*Presentation of four amazing case studies of Pakistan NGOs and others (need to illustrate reaching policy makers, journalists, and grassroots) (20 minutes)
  • Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crisis is a World Refugee Commission initiative. Mama connects workers to one another and to experts, creating a community where they can access information, support, and skills. Overall, they aim to improve maternal health care and reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in crisis-affected settings by recognizing and supporting clinical practitioners working on these issues.
  • Mama developed a robust Facebook app that aims to integrate sms messaging for their audience – midwives & doctors. Those using their platform are part of a community that shares stories, insight & advice with one another. Mama has some pivoting to do though. They developed this app on Facebook, but that isn’t where their intended audience is. Their sms tool is functioning very well but they are working to determine how they can maintain supporting their newfound audience while adjusting to engage their intended audience. The sms platform was built out for FB which was silly - the person who advised them (I know her) clearly doesn't understand third world Countries. But, I thought that given your look at sms initiatives, this may be useful.
  • Mama is posting contextual stories with photos – each from different areas they serve – to show who is affected within their scope of interest.Using Survey Monkey to listen to their audience.Responding to posts by FB supporters and giving thanks to their online audience.Using a tab to have conversations between field workers and mentors.
  • Breakthrough uses innovative media & technology to change the world: producing video games, music videos, animations, and films for human rights. They address critical global issues including violence against women, sexuality and HIV/AIDS, racial justice, and immigrant rights. Breakthrough's campaign Bell Bajao (Ring the Bell in Hindi) urges men and boys to take a stand against domestic violence because one out of every three women worldwide faces violence behind closed doors. Based in New Delhi, this program aims to engage men & boys in their effort to end domestic violence against women. They provide guidance on safely reporting domestic violence, tips on how to address it, and provide resources to everyone affected by abuse.Bell Bajao is using social media to influence and empower everyone affected by domestic violence. They have a presence on virtually every platform, with a consistent look & feel. There are plug-ins on the website, infographics with statistical data relevant to their mission, information for those seeking help, and guides for those who want to help. They are having conversations with their Twitter followers, leveraging the option to have aesthetically pleasing and relevant tabs on their Facebook Timeline and integrate material on each social media channel. The website has both a Twitter Feed and a Facebook plug-in but also provides buttons so that their visitors can find them on the other channels they use. They have also integrated the Share This widget.All web pages are available for translation in Chinese, Hindi, Spanish and English by using the Google Translate widget.Twitter: @Ball_BajaoWebsite: http://www.bellbajao.orgFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/BellBajao
  • Katha is a nonprofit organization working with and in story and storytelling since 1988. Their mission is to help every child in urban slums realize their full potential through community based quality learning.Katha is a unique model that seamlessly connects grassroots work in education, urban resurgence and story. Their credo: Uncommon creativities for a common good. The operate under the idea that childrencan bring change that is sustainable and real. They run 71 schools in slum communities and work with the government to bring the joy of reading to more than 200,000 children. Katha is working tirelessly towards literacy programs through their innovative integrated educational system and are very proud that their schools, schools on wheels and preschools develop a social, artistic and culturally rich awareness in children who live in urban slums and streets or in tribal villages.Their website loads quickly, they offer a digital bookstore, and it is very simple to navigate through dense material. On Facebook, they share many photos – including images of their publications – and include an Events button so it’s easy for guests to find out what is going on next.They opted to simply use their logo as their profile image as the size of their entire logo would not fit in a thumbnail. There is continuity in the overall look and feel.Katha is on YouTube – their main video is on the main page of the website. The website has buttons for guests to easily visit them on social media channels on their website. While they are not on Twitter, the Twitter button activates a window for guests to share about Katha on their Twitter feed.Katha is transparent with their financials, has an elaborate online photo gallery, makes it easy for people to register to volunteer with a tab on their website & a link on their Facebook page.
  • The mission of Music Basti is to strengthen the voices of children-at-risk, while raising awareness also on social global issues such as control and management of natural resources, food sufficiency, gender equity, sustainable environment, health and education. MusicBasti does this by establishing and strengthening an egalitarian socio- economic order based on the democratic values of equality, sharing, non-violence, cooperation and common good.They promote music for community building and development, with a focus on work with children-at-risk through creating participative music education programs & life-skills.The Music Basti program focuses on children-at-risk and urban youth through creating participative music education programs and life-skills. Its aim is to create and promote self- confidence and creativity through interaction and sharing in and through music actively, also involving the youth and music community in consultation, creation, implementation and evaluation.To build credibility, Music Basti mentions many of their program partners and awards on their Facebook page. They have a plethora of photo albums from various events and tag people & other organizations as appropriate.Their website includes a Facebook plug-in for ease in “Liking” their Facebook page. The tabs within the landing page direct visitors to the various areas of their website. Their website is in a simple blog format and it is easy for people to comment or contribute to posts.
  • Bhumi is one of India’s largest youth volunteer non-profits working for the holistic development of under-privileged children by bringing together talented community leaders to volunteer andhelp educate under-privileged children.The Bhumi website has a Facebook plug-in so it is easy for visitors to “Like” their Facebook page, the website loads quickly although the images for the “Featured Child” plug-in are missing. The blog feed scrolls as do the highlights of the organizations. Volunteers can log-in to view volunteer opportunities and anyone can apply to volunteer on their website or by way of a button on the Facebook Timeline.The Facebook page is rich with videos, photo albums, and conversation. They have a lot of activity on each post and engage with their Facebook audience. While they use a different logo on the website versus the Facebook page, they are still a variation of one another so the look and feel are aligned. All events are posted on Facebook – they use Facebook events to help organize as well as create flyers that can be found posted on the walls of their supporters. They use colorful graphics on their marketing materials and have them color coordinate with events and the overall color scheme of the organization. Many of their marketing materials are found in their Facebook photo albums.They acknowledge sponsors and partner organizations by posting their logo, including images of their participation at events, and expressing gratitude in Facebook posts. They ask volunteers and participants for feedback, get permission to quote them, and use that content for marketing purposes. These quotes are often used for posts within their Facebook page. In the description of albums featuring their marketing materials, they include a shortened url that allows anyone to download a pdf file of their brochure. ie.: Download full souvenir @ http://bit.ly/s11souv Website: http://www.Bhumi.org.in
  • Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7438870@N04/1709710149/
  • Walk through the strategy worksheet – and provide realistic expectations of what they will accomplish in the 45 minutes after lunch … Advice: go through this and figure out what you can decide now and what will need further discussion back in your organization
  • We’ve spent the morning doing some reflection and self-assessment of our NGOs are at and looking at examples from other NGOs. Now it is time to begin planning your social media strategy. It is important to have a strategy in place and to make sure that the learning project you’ll be doing from this session aligns to it. It is also important to understand that you may not complete this strategy today – it will require some input from others in your organization, so this afternoon is help you get started.Introduce the strategy worksheet and exercise. (very brief overview) (30 minutes)
  • Images: Cambodia4Kids Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cambodia4kidsorg/6329549059/in/set-72157628135873440/Each organization will begin to work through the strategy worksheets answering the questions and focusing on identifying SMART objectives and audiences and how to measure success. Each organization will create a post with their SMART social objective and tape to the wall. (30 minutes)Stephanie and Beth will roam; answer questions.“Social Media Strategy Practicum”  Framing: We’ve spent the morning doing some reflection and self-assessment of our NGOs are at and looking at examples from other NGOs. Now it is time to begin planning your social media strategy. It is important to have a strategy in place and to make sure that the learning project you’ll be doing from this session aligns to it. It is also important to understand that you may not complete this strategy today – it will require some input from others in your organization, so this afternoon is help you get started. Content: Introduce the strategy worksheet and exercise. (very brief overview) (30 minutes) Exercise: Each organization will begin to work through the strategy worksheets answering the questions and focusing on identifying SMART objectives and audiences and how to measure success. Each organization will create a post with their SMART social objective and tape to the wall. (30 minutes)Stephanie and Beth will roam; answer questions. Debrief: (30 minutes)Participants will walk around and review the posters and add sticky notes with feedback. (10 minutes)As a group, we will do a gallery group, with the facilitator interviewing each organization about their SMART objective and facilitating feedback from the other participants. (20 minutes)Tweet your SMART objectives using hashtag #netngopk
  • Debrief: (30 minutes)Participants will walk around and review the posters and add sticky notes with feedback. (10 minutes)As a group, we will do a gallery group, with the facilitator interviewing each organization about their SMART objective and facilitating feedback from the other participants. (20 minutes)
  • Tweet your SMART objectives using hashtag #netngoin
  • A home base is a place online that you own, that is your online ‘home’. Home is your web site or blog. Outposts are places that you have an online presence out in other parts of the web that you might not ‘own’. Outposts will mean different things to different NGOs – they select their outposts based on:-Their social media strategy-Their capacity – having an outposts takes time and effort – you want to do it well – it is better to engage deeply on one outpost and then spread yourself too thinThese ‘outposts’ are sites where you can:add contentbuild relationshipstest ideasgrow a profilelistenexperimentmake connectionstry to be usefulplayOut of this combination of activities many things come. Relationships, ideas, traffic, resources, partnerships, community and much more emerge from the outposts – much of it making yourhome base stronger.http://www.problogger.net/archives/2008/10/06/social-media-home-bases-and-outposts/
  • We are moving towards having the organization's web presence be less static information and more interactive or social. Not everyone needs a separate web site and a blog, some organizations consolidate. Free blogging platforms like blogger give you an easy way to update your content and if you already have a web site, you can easily add as an interactive part of your web site. You need to think about how to link or integrate your social media outposts. Benefits of a blog is that it helps with your search engine resultsEasy way to keep content updated and freshGives your NGOs brand visibility
  • NTEN is an organization that helps nonprofits and technology (http://www.nten.org).Their home Base (http://www.nten.org) is a web site, but they integrated a blog. They use the blog as an organizational newsletter and write about current events and activities. The blog is also shared on Facebook and Twitter and other social outposts. They also link to their social outposts on their web site.
  • Their blog content is also cross-posted on their Facebook page automatically. They get a lot of comments and conversations from their members because their members are on Facebook – and may not come to the web site to read the blog.
  • They also use their blog talk about the programs and summarize information about their members. They using a listening dashboard to monitor news and updates from their members and summarize them in a weekly blog post on their site.
  • On Twitter, they promote their members web sites as well as point back to content on their blog which is promoting their events.
  • Remember, home base can a web site or blog or combination. These are the principles for an effective presence.Sources: Add to the WikiWeb Site Check List:http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com/resources/online-marketing/10-point-basic-website-checklist-for-nonprofits/Effective Nonprofit Web Sites:http://gettingattention.org/articles/168/websites/effective-nonprofit-websites.htmlEffective Nonprofit Web Design:http://gettingattention.org/2010/06/nonprofit-website-content-above-the-fold.html 
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • Content curation is the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information on the web and sharing the very best content with your audience.
  • http://www.contentmarketinginstitute.com/2011/09/food-pyramid-for-content-marketing/http://www.flickr.com/photos/oberazzi/974939987/in/photostream/A content strategy is the process of distributing created and curated content through different channels to reach your audience and move them to action to reach your goals. coordination, creativity, and curation.
  • Give a brief introduction
  • You can mix it up. You don’t have to create new content for every channel!
  • http://www.jarche.com/2010/10/network-learning-working-smarter/Seek: Is finding the information that is relevant to your social media objective and that your audience finds valuable.Sense: This is the process of creating a product based what you find. If we used the metaphor of a DJ, this is the play list. This could be as simple as an annotated link or a blog post.Share: This is the process of having a conversation with your audience about the content
  • It is important think about your content in terms of what you can plan ahead and what you need to be ready for when there is breaking news ..Breaking news – have to publish with short lead time – but you don’t have to be first. Quality comes first. There is a technique called “news-jacking”Newsjacking is piggy-backing on timely news or Meerman points out “the second paragraph of a news story.”    It is done by creating original content that takes advantage of timely events that are getting mainstream media attention and providing your organization’s view or take on the topic and sharing it with your audience, including journalists. Timely – Holidays, programs, events, and regular features “Facebook Fridays” – These should be in your editorial calendarAnytime – This is content related to your organization’s mission, can be about your organization or your topic area – but linked to a specific event. You can create this during slow times or have it on hand so it is efficient to share your content.Campaigns – This is content to support a specific organizational campaign.
  • Flickr Photo by drachenspinne & http://www.flickr.com/photos/sashamd/1413216979/
  • You need to plan out your content, ideally on a monthly basis.Many NGOs use an editorial calendar that is a simple spreadsheet that lists:-Date-Channel-Frequency-Content IdeaThe can be curated or created, but it has to be what your audience will respond to meet your objectives.Photo Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/peejeebee/4042966090/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/drydens/2349707107/sizes/l/in/photostream/You have to organize your ideas in a way that makes it easy to curate or create content
  • Get ideas and input from others, you don’t have to do it alone!
  • You can mix it up. You don’t have create new content for every channel!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/thelotuscarroll/sets/72157603809711727/with/2339070093/Be consistent – don’t share a bunch of content one day or one week and then stop for several weeks.
  • Photo of the Indian cricket team in huddle: cricketgallery.oneindia.inReflection questions: How does your organization create content? What are the challenges to curating content?