Day 2

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  • Full Group Debrief: (7 minutes)What are some of your key reflections from yesterday?What are you most curious about learning today? Photo by: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ninjawil/2205949982/We are all participating an intense multi-day training. The morning after is a great time to generate “overnight reflections” about new insights from the previous day. We are also going to have you continue to practice your Twitter skills by taking twitter breaks to tweet your reflections using the hashtag #netngopk Agenda Review (3 minutes)
  • 3 min
  • 30 minutesWhat is the wiki?How we are using it to support the projectExpectationsTour of the WikiHow to set up an accountHow to edit your journal page
  • http://on.fb.me/netngopk
  • Include a mix of case studies that illustrate grassroots ruse
  • Incorporate examples of how social media can be used to reach journalists
  • Incorporate 1-2 in-country examples that focus on reaching local audiences
  • Goal: To be able to draw make connections from previous successful communications and link to social media strategyIcebreaker: Your most effective overall communications campaign – what made it work?
  • Handout exercise sheet info35 minutes Ask participants to pair up by organization discuss their most effective communications strategy or campaign. What did they do in the planning or implementation that lead to the success? What’s needed for success? What is the definition of success? (10 minutes)Ask each person then writes down on three index cards or index card size sticky notes phrases or elements of successful communications strategy with their name and organization. (3 minutes) Facilitator gathers index cards/sticky notes and randomly distributes two cards to each participant – leaving 16 on the table or puts sticky notes on the wall. (2 minutes)Participants need to circulate and gather, exchange, steal, or take sticky notes left on the table or the wall until they each end up with three index cards that match their experience. (5 minutes)Each organizational pair reports out on their phrases – facilitator summarizes, co-trainer flip charts. (15 minutes)Summary: A social media strategy is most effective when integrated in your overall communications strategy – we call this “Multi-channel” – Knowing the definition for success and what works will help your social media be more effective. Twitter Break
  • http://www.momsrising.org/MomsRising is one of the best living examples of a nonprofit born as Networked Nonprofit, a  simple, agile, and transparent organization that work more like a network than a single isolated institution.   Like all Networked Nonprofits,  Momsrising values simplicity and the ability to leverage its network while engaging and building relationships with people and organizations to get results.It comes as no surprise that Momsrising embraces measurement and learning.  It is embedded in the way they work and their organizational culture. It has fueled their growth from zero members in May of 2006, to over a million active members—moms, dads, grandparents, aunts, and uncles—today! And, they do not count “likes” on Facebook as victory.   Instead, they identify key organizational results areas and associated metrics to define successes and failures.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Their key results generally include:• increasing the movement size by increasing membership• garnering attention from all media through creative engagements• getting policies passed• working with aligned partner organizations• increasing capacity
  • They know that to get results they cannot solely rely on social media tools.  They use results as a guide for designing and implementing rapid responses as part of their multi-channel citizen engagement campaigns. They know how to gain attention in an age of media clutter and overload …. The importance of having an “integrated strategy” The media landscape today consists of four domains Traditional media …. (such as CNN, NY Times)Tradigital media … (includes mostly blogs with a lot of authority like the Huffington Post)Owned Media …. (this is your organization’s web site)Social Media … which includes social networks like Facebook, Twitter – increasingly being accessed on mobile devices What’s interesting is that the consumer does not make the distinction – they may get their news from reading a friend’s newsfeed or hear it on NPR or follow NPR on Facebook or get email alerts, etc.Momsrising has done a great job of this … they engage people and encourage them to share their stories – and they in turn share those stories through all four domains.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/Take for example how they responded over the summer to the ongoing budget negotiations, when  tens of billions of dollars in cuts to Medicaid and Medicare were put on the table.Momsrising wanted to demonstrate to Congress that there was a grassroots constituency that supported Medicaid and dispel a misperception that while Medicare has a strong constituency, Medicaid did not.
  • Momsrising knows from years of message testing and research, that to change minds about an issue, wonky stats fall flat.   But stories resonate.   They identified a rapid response goal of getting the stories dozens of moms who benefited from Medicaid and who could put out a strong defense for the program in the media.Using a story collection landing page on their site, they urged their members to share their stories.   They collected over 500 stories from 43 states about how Medicaid was helping families.   They curated the best ones that illustrated their message and re-purposed these stories in to all their action alerts across channels.  This generated over 100,000 letters to Congress about the debt ceiling and the importance of Medcaid.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-results/
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/Notes Kristen, “Social Media channels like Twitter and Facebook are important to us because we share those stories directly with targeted members of Congress. We post specific stories on targeted legislator’s Facebook Walls or we @reply them on Twitter. We’ve found that there are less filters between us and Congress when we use social media channels. While they can easily ignore our emails and phone calls, sharing the story directly with them through social media channels – they have to respond.”   Recent studies have shown that 64% of  Congressional offices use social media to gauge public opinion.)Another key result area is to bring about policy change to create a more family-friendly nation.  Last month, Momsrising was invited tobring moms to the White House to talk with policy staff about their experience with Medicaid.   The White House  blogged about power of people’s stories.
  • They also place these stories as letters to the editors in traditional newspapers.  
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/momsrising-key-r esults/https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150249212856610&set=a.10150249212851610.322274.8321461609&type=1Masters of the multi-channel approach, Momsrising’s other tactics included hand delivering “story books”, hard copy compilations of the stories to Congress and the White House.  
  • As a Networked Nonprofit, they understand  simplicity and have not built a complex nonprofit with its own policy department.   Momsrising  focuses on what they do best – outreach and organizing moms – but not in isolation.   Momsrising  works with dozens of advocacy groups to extend their network without pulling themselves off task. Kristin said, “Our expertise is in working with our moments and powering the movement.  We don’t go out on anything solo, we rely on partners for policy analysis and many other things.”
  • Image: http://www.blurgroup.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/twitter-vector-icon.gif / http://www.blurgroup.com/blog/tag/twitter
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • PYA is using all of the principles for this specific campaign. PYA uses online tools to ignite offline action in many instances – not just Unveiling Pakistan. This particular initiative is in collaboration with an other organization – tasks and responsibilities are shared which helps both of them balance their work flow. They are sharing image submissions to further engage – motivate others to participate, trigger conversations, and strengthen cultural pride.
  • Here are examples of initiative promoted online that promote their objectives + offline action.Fundraiser while watching a cricket matchThe Peace Parade in Lahore last August for Independence DayA graphic for their Facebook page & website that includes photos of many PYA members – great acknowledgement.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • It takes a unique person to recognize the correlation between adding personality to Facebook posts and an increase in exhibit attendance, but that is exactly what Lisa Leong, Program Manager at the Kearny Street Workshop (KSW), discovered as she poured over her monthly social media metrics spreadsheet. She regularly analyzed all the comments on KSW’s Facebook page and categorized them by topic. She compared those results to her Facebook Insights metrics to figure out what content resonated with their audience. “Who knew we could inspire all those online conversations about our artists, just by adding a bit of our own personality to our posts?” KSW’s mission is to produce, present, and promote art that empowers Asian American artists and communities. Founded in 1972 in San Francisco's Chinatown/Manilatown, its artistic programs both honor the community’s cultural heritage and nurture emerging artists and contemporary practices. The organization offers educational workshops, performances, and exhibitions that showcase stories of diverse individuals and communities in the Bay Area. It uses its website, email, print, local, and ethnic media channels to promote its programs. It had recently started to experiment with social media.Like any good measurement maven, Leong started out with clear objectives. “Our goal was to increase awareness, engagement, and participation in our programs both for audiences and artists. But we are a small nonprofit, with a two-person staff,” Lisa explained. “I am the social media manager, but it isn’t 100% of my job. We started with identifying our objectives and metrics that would help us improve our content and engagement strategy.
  • Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use best practices to:We tracked results by collecting several metrics from Facebook Insights, tracking participation in our events, and by adding some questions to our event surveys.” Their goals and metrics were: Increase exposure as measured by the number of likes on Facebook.TOOL: Facebook InsightsRESULT: We increased our fan base by 72% Increaseengagement by doubling comments/likes per post.TOOL: Facebook Insights RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%Increase participation of new people in classes and events.TOOL: Event Survey RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through Facebook“We had to think carefully about the workflow,” Lisa adds. “I spend an hour a month planning our editorial calendar with my executive director. It’s a simple spreadsheet that lists the different types of content, topics, and, of course, our success metrics. We look at that data to help us make more effective decisions the next month. In addition, I spend two hours per week on social media. I gather my data weekly so it isn’t overwhelming.”
  • Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use best practices to:We tracked results by collecting several metrics from Facebook Insights, tracking participation in our events, and by adding some questions to our event surveys.” Their goals and metrics were: Increase exposure as measured by the number of likes on Facebook.TOOL: Facebook InsightsRESULT: We increased our fan base by 72% Increaseengagement by doubling comments/likes per post.TOOL: Facebook Insights RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%Increase participation of new people in classes and events.TOOL: Event Survey RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through Facebook“We had to think carefully about the workflow,” Lisa adds. “I spend an hour a month planning our editorial calendar with my executive director. It’s a simple spreadsheet that lists the different types of content, topics, and, of course, our success metrics. We look at that data to help us make more effective decisions the next month. In addition, I spend two hours per week on social media. I gather my data weekly so it isn’t overwhelming.”
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • During workshop 2, you learned how to set up a couple of simple tools to monitor and track what people are saying about you and create a simple dashboard on iGoogle or NetVibes – like this example for a conference.This was a conference that was using a hashtag and they wanted to track who was talking about the conference before, during, and after and to be able to respond.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Gawaahi collaborates and uses various forms of media and campaigns to reach different audiences and deliver various messages. All of those messages are aligned with their mission that aims to archive digital stories of abuse, survival and resistance. They are interactive – have conversations with their audience + policy makers. Engaging - They welcome people to participate & join them at offline events. Relationships – They maintain integrity in maintaining someone’s anonymity if necessary.Integrated – They are well integrated between their website, blog, YouTube, Facebook & offline
  • The website makes it easy for the visitor to connect on other platforms and see how they are taking specific actions within their objectives. They thank people for stopping by and acknowledge contributors/supporters.
  • You can get started with curating on your organization social media presences – like Facebook or blogging. This example is from Twitter.Bruce Lesley is the CEO of Children First an child welfare organization. His curates content on his personal Twitter profile. He uses Twitter to curate information related to his organization’s mission and work as a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions. He also uses content curation for sources for his guest blogging.  His use of Twitter (and his organization’s use of Twitter and all communications channels for that matter) serve this intent:First Focus is working to change the dialogue around children’s issues by taking a cross-cutting and broad based approach to federal policy making. In all of our work, we seek to raise awareness regarding public policies impacting children and ensure that related programs have the resources necessary to help them grow up in a healthy and nurturing environment.If you take a look at Bruce Lesley’s Twitter stream, you will see that he is curating information on public policies impacting children. Bruce does his own curating, using Google Reader and FlipBoard.  Any individual or nonprofit organization can curate information using these tools.  They can make it strategic by linking the information to their mission.  We are going to have a session this afternoon that will tell you more about how to do content curation.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Brand champions are people who are the most passionate about your work that you’ve been able to connect with through social media channels or even offline. Influencers are people who other people listen to and are associated with your topic or field. These can be experts, well-known people, or people who have done a lot of work in this subject matter area.You probably already know who your champions are offline and it is fairly easy to identify them online as well. Who is responding to you on Facebook or your blog? Do you know them? Recognize them and then developed a formal way to work with them.
  • This story is about a large NGO but your organization doesn’t have to be large to use these techniques.USA for UNHCR  is a 501(c)(3) headquartered in Washington, D.C. They raise funds and awareness in the United States for the lifesaving work that more than 6,000 staffers of Geneva-based UNHCR undertake for refugees around the world, 24/7.   USA for UNHCR created the Blue Key campaign as a way to drive awareness of this global issue in the US. The $5 blue key pin or pendant symbolizes the one thing most of us have and that refugees don’t: a key to their own home.The Blue Key site was only launched in December 2010, and its social/digital aspects were relatively new, so there was not a lot of data to base KPIs on. Overall, when we went into the first phase of the campaign, we had two goals: to secure at least three Blue Key Champions, and  to get 6,000 keys ordered between May 9 and June 20 (World Refugee Day).These goals were important to USA for UNHCR first, because the entire Blue Key campaign revolves around more people purchasing keys, and second, because with a limited budget for traditional outreach, they relied on willing bloggers to help us get the word out.They recruited bloggers who write about this topic. They set up a private FB group to communicate with them and coordinate the campaign, share content, etc.
  • They organized a “Tweetathon” – an online event on Twitter. They asked their Champions signed up to tweetabout the refugee crisis and #bluekey (the campaign hashtag) from 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. on World Refugee Day In addition, RoyaHosseini, who manages the KhaledHosseini Foundation’s Twitter account, signed on as a “special guest” between 1 & 2 p.m. (KhaledHosseini is the author ofThe Kite Runner.)Each of their Champions helped get the message about the campaign out to their networks and it was very efficient and effective for the organizations.All told, there was a 169% increase in web traffic that day, compared to the previous high point a few weeks prior. We get real time confirmations every time someone orders a key, so we knew it was working. Finally, via campaign URLs in Google Analytics, we saw that Twitter was the main driver of traffic (for May 9 – June 20). This was not the case before the tweetathon.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • http://www.prathambooks.org/Pratham Books is a small civil society NGO in India. Its mission is to get high quality children’s books to rural villages. They publish their books and materials under a creative commons license. Everyone in the organization uses social media to spread their mission and serve as a bridge between the bottom of the pyramid and others. Recently, they wrote a blog post about a newspaper article on how some teenagers collected books and took them to a rural village. Someone left a comment and offered to purchase more books for the kids to take to the village. But, the newspaper did not know how to get in touch with them. So everyone at Pratham Books used Twitter and within a few hours they had the cell phone number.
  • How can your NGO integrate social media tasks into staff’s work flow? How would you divide the work?
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • grist.org is a Seattle-based nonprofit that supports a destination news website for environmental news, reports, and opinion with a wry sense of humor. Chip Giller launched grist.org in 1999 to counter the stereotype that all environmentalists were either dour doomsayers or holier-than-thou tree-huggers. grist.org’s editorial mission is to publish a new, positive form of green journalism with a comical twist. The vision is to spread independent environmental online content free of charge to a young and growing readership. grist.org reports on everything from climate change to the organic food movement, demonstrating how the environment intersects with critical issues like poverty, health care, and economic growth. What started as a quirky website with a hundred readers has grown to a leading news source that engages millions who might otherwise be turned off by the-bummer-of-the-day environmental news.Grist.org Uses Measurement to Learn How to Deepen Relationshipsgrist.org has succeeded in connecting with a younger audience that not only reads its content but is also inspired to take action. It has accomplished this by using measurement to learn what it takes to move readers from being passive consumers of content to taking offline action. grist.org operates on a modest budget but is highly effective at uncovering real meaning behind green stories and connecting big issues like climate change to daily life. While grist.org constantly attracts new readers, these are not the passive consumers typical of most media. They engage in the comments, share their own stories, take action, and, more importantly, are changing their personal behavior to benefit the environment and, ultimately, to save the planet. Grist.org Builds Its Own Ladder of Engagementgrist.org is a data-informed organization that uses a ladder of engagement not only to guide its content and social media integration strategy, but uses measurement at each rung of the ladder to ensure that they are getting results.
  • grist.org’s ladder of engagement is elegantly simple and illustrates how their audience makes the journey from passive consumers of information to sustainable living champions, see Figure 6.2. The steps include fun on-ramps, sharing stories of personal behavior change, personal calls to action, and calls to action on policy change. grist.org does not consider pageviews or other web traffic stats the end point, but only an indicator of success at the bottom rung of their ladder. Their real goal is higher up the ladder, and that is societal change. If they aren’t successful, the consequences are dire. Or as Giller says, “The planet will get it.” grist.org’s key results are:  Footprint: The reach of their activities, both online and offline.Engagement: How readers engage with their content by commenting, contributing content, and sharing their content with other people.Individual Behavior Change: Impact on users behaviors, including purchase decisions and daily routines that advance sustainable practices.Societal Change: Impact on society, policy discussions, and conversations that advance sustainable practices.  Grist.org’s Measurement: Engagement, Indices, Surveysgrist.org uses a combination of tools to measure along the ladder of engagement, including Google Analytics, surveys, real-time monitoring tools, and collecting anecdotal stories.
  • So I wanted to walk you through a few experiments we have been doing—specifically on Twitter.The first was based on a piece that Tom Philpott wrote about all of the horrific things in soda. We saw huge traction on this story and decided to jump on an opportunity.So within less than 24 hours we convened a twitter chat.I am sure most of you heard about the Obama twitter chat at the beginning of the month—basically they revolve around a hashtag where people can tweet questions, answers, comments. The cool thing is when people tweet to this hashtag, it shows up in their feed. So all of their followers see it and can get hooked into the content—it creates a resonance that doesn’t happen as easily via email, etc. So with a few hundred tweets to this chat, we actually reached 100s of thousands of people.
  • Interactive lecture: - Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives- Monitors, listens, and researches the people in their network- Get feedback and start conversations about their work- Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate- Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread their mission- Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow- Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • Handout exercise sheet info35 minutes Ask participants to pair up by organization discuss their most effective communications strategy or campaign. What did they do in the planning or implementation that lead to the success? What’s needed for success? What is the definition of success? (10 minutes)Ask each person then writes down on three index cards or index card size sticky notes phrases or elements of successful communications strategy with their name and organization. (3 minutes) Facilitator gathers index cards/sticky notes and randomly distributes two cards to each participant – leaving 16 on the table or puts sticky notes on the wall. (2 minutes)Participants need to circulate and gather, exchange, steal, or take sticky notes left on the table or the wall until they each end up with three index cards that match their experience. (5 minutes)Each organizational pair reports out on their phrases – facilitator summarizes, co-trainer flip charts. (15 minutes)Summary: A social media strategy is most effective when integrated in your overall communications strategy – we call this “Multi-channel” – Knowing the definition for success and what works will help your social media be more effective. Twitter Break
  • Images are all of Pakistani’s. The “Fly” is of ArfaKarim, the youngest female Microsoft ‘expert’ in Pakistan. She’s famous – recently passed away from complications of a seizure. She’s a hero of the Nation. http://i1.tribune.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/322376-ArfaKarim-1326734111-310-640x480.jpgWe have discussed what success looks like and what’s needed for an overall communications strategy. We understand that social media needs to be aligned with overall communications strategy to be successful. And, we’ve reviewed what makes social media use effective. . Now, let’s look at where your organizations are and then compare them to the “Maturity of Practice Model”.
  • Images are all of Pakistani’s. The “Fly” is of ArfaKarim, the youngest female Microsoft ‘expert’ in Pakistan. She’s famous – recently passed away from complications of a seizure. She’s a hero of the Nation. http://i1.tribune.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/322376-ArfaKarim-1326734111-310-640x480.jpgCrawl, Walk, Run, Fly Model: There are four different levels of social media maturity of practice. These are classified as “Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly.” One level is not better than another, it is just where the organization is at in its social media usage. 10 minutes - Be aware, that it takes months if not years to reach the highest level of practice. Not every nonprofit will go through the levels at the same pace due to organizational culture, capacity, or communications objectives and target audiences. The goal of training and technical assistance is to help NGOs improve by getting to the next level. If they can’t fly, then run. If they can’t run, then walk. If they can’t walk, then crawl. The idea is to keep improving.
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • Song to play coming in from break - 1947 - A Song by Mehdi Maloof - http://www.talentidols.com/mehdiCampfire Stories (50 minutes)Framing: One of the great things about social media is that it is relatively new and we’re all learning in real-time. As we pointed in the principles, learning from other NGOs is a best practice. So, we’re going to share some stories.*Presentation of four amazing case studies of Pakistan NGOs and others (need to illustrate reaching policy makers, journalists, and grassroots) (20 minutes)
  • Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crisis is a World Refugee Commission initiative. Mama connects workers to one another and to experts, creating a community where they can access information, support, and skills. Overall, they aim to improve maternal health care and reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in crisis-affected settings by recognizing and supporting clinical practitioners working on these issues.
  • Mama developed a robust Facebook app that aims to integrate sms messaging for their audience – midwives & doctors. Those using their platform are part of a community that shares stories, insight & advice with one another. Mama has some pivoting to do though. They developed this app on Facebook, but that isn’t where their intended audience is. Their sms tool is functioning very well but they are working to determine how they can maintain supporting their newfound audience while adjusting to engage their intended audience. The sms platform was built out for FB which was silly - the person who advised them (I know her) clearly doesn't understand third world Countries. But, I thought that given your look at sms initiatives, this may be useful.
  • Mama is posting contextual stories with photos – each from different areas they serve – to show who is affected within their scope of interest.Using Survey Monkey to listen to their audience.Responding to posts by FB supporters and giving thanks to their online audience.Using a tab to have conversations between field workers and mentors.
  • Khudi is a newer social movement that just recently got comfortable in the social media space and launched to 60,000 likes. While Likes don’t mean everything, they also have many supporters talking about them on Facebook. The engagement is increasing online, they have started to integrate blog posts with their magazine publication – The Laaltain – and have recently updated their website to look like the Laaltain Website so there is harmony. They are having conversations on their website – sharing media, acknowledging other likeminded entities, and not leaving a comment unacknowledged. There is a Twitter feed on their website, the photos load quickly, there is space to comment and share.They created an album of cover images for Facebook that are bilingual (English & Urdu) with their logo on it so other people can use them. The messages are powerful and are aligned with their mission.
  • Come, Clean Pakistan is a newer initiative to build community offline. They have a Facebook event, they talk about it on their main page + on Twitter, they share images from their convenings, and they regularly accredit inspiration to the initiative in India that goes by the same name.
  • They are having conversations on their website – sharing media, acknowledging other likeminded entities, and not leaving a comment unacknowledged. There is a Twitter feed on their website, the photos load quickly, there is space to comment and share. On Twitter, they are RTing, sharing news specifically with supporters, responding to inquiries. They have a page for a festival they organize – IYCF with albums.
  • The Citizens Archive of Pakistan is working to serve as the foremost library and museum of Pakistani oral histories, photography, art, culture and historical documentation, demonstrating the strength and spirit of the country through the perspective of its citizensAesthetically pleasing website. Podcasts available – download fast. Easy to share with plug-ins.Collaborative initiative with the Express Tribune on ending violence. Submissions online. Announced + with an event on Facebook. Seen on the Facebook pages of likeminded supporters.YouTube page with over 100 videos – resembles website & blog.
  • The 'Exchange for Change' project brought together 2400 students in Pakistan and India through letters, postcards and oral histories and seeks to bridge the divide and trust deficit that exists between the two neighbors.This is my Story: Dialogue with Pakistan was a huge initiative that started as a pilot and then expanded. It was the first time awareness campaign addressed issues pertaining to violence, displacement and reconciliation. Film, personal stories, and photography combined in a public exhibition and asocial media campaign. This opportunity marks the first time that artists will explore how conflict has impacted arts and culture, families and communities in Pakistan.Photographers, Videographers and New Media Artists all joined in to participate. This was in the press. . The aim was to initiate dialogue through these personal portraits.They have also done: The ‘School Outreach Tour’ educates one thousand children in low-income schools across Karachi, using a unique curriculum which focuses on inculcating critical thinking skills, tolerance and civic sense. We have also just adopted our own school, which will provide affordable education to children in a low-income industrial area and are running a summer camp for underprivileged students.AND'Oral History Project' interviews senior citizens about the creation of Pakistan and momentous events in its history. The Minority Project focuses on the experiences of religious minorities the country and documents their festivals and celebrations. The 1971 Project is creating a record of what happened during the 1971 war and subsequent independence of Bangladesh.
  • Citizens for Free and Responsible Media’s goal is not to get channels banned or to get TV hosts or journalists fired, but to encourage channels to evolve their own set of guidelines and code of ethics in conjunction with senior producers, journalists and concerned citizens, to ensure that privacy and human dignity are not violated. They urge them to make these guidelines public. They also urge them to incorporate a channel for media consumers to approach in case of complaint or redress, and appoint internal ombudsmen for this purpose. They also urge the industry to revise the current ratings system, and align the ‘quality of content’ with the ‘quantity of viewership.’CFRM declared five cardinal rules of media consumer movement, comprising:1. Transparency2. Accuracy3. Fairness4. Thoroughness5. Independence
  • This org was one of the ring leaders in stopping the recent attempt to heavily censor internet in PakistanExcellent use of petitionsChange.org petition- http://www.change.org/petitions/to-mr-zafar-siddiqi-ceo-samaa-tv-stop-subah-saverey-maya-kay-sath-vigilantism-like-lal-masjidSign-on petition - http://signon.org/sign/world-heritage-site-for.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1126035 (unrelated to this cause but still being used by them) Very well-versed in all forms of digital communicationFounder is a member of many Facebook groups and shares media relevant to the objectives of C4RM with supporting community leaders and causes.
  • Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7438870@N04/1709710149/
  • Walk through the strategy worksheet – and provide realistic expectations of what they will accomplish in the 45 minutes after lunch … Advice: go through this and figure out what you can decide now and what will need further discussion back in your organization
  • We’ve spent the morning doing some reflection and self-assessment of our NGOs are at and looking at examples from other NGOs. Now it is time to begin planning your social media strategy. It is important to have a strategy in place and to make sure that the learning project you’ll be doing from this session aligns to it. It is also important to understand that you may not complete this strategy today – it will require some input from others in your organization, so this afternoon is help you get started.Introduce the strategy worksheet and exercise. (very brief overview) (30 minutes)
  • Images: Cambodia4Kids Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cambodia4kidsorg/6329549059/in/set-72157628135873440/Each organization will begin to work through the strategy worksheets answering the questions and focusing on identifying SMART objectives and audiences and how to measure success. Each organization will create a post with their SMART social objective and tape to the wall. (30 minutes)Stephanie and Beth will roam; answer questions.“Social Media Strategy Practicum”  Framing: We’ve spent the morning doing some reflection and self-assessment of our NGOs are at and looking at examples from other NGOs. Now it is time to begin planning your social media strategy. It is important to have a strategy in place and to make sure that the learning project you’ll be doing from this session aligns to it. It is also important to understand that you may not complete this strategy today – it will require some input from others in your organization, so this afternoon is help you get started. Content: Introduce the strategy worksheet and exercise. (very brief overview) (30 minutes) Exercise: Each organization will begin to work through the strategy worksheets answering the questions and focusing on identifying SMART objectives and audiences and how to measure success. Each organization will create a post with their SMART social objective and tape to the wall. (30 minutes)Stephanie and Beth will roam; answer questions. Debrief: (30 minutes)Participants will walk around and review the posters and add sticky notes with feedback. (10 minutes)As a group, we will do a gallery group, with the facilitator interviewing each organization about their SMART objective and facilitating feedback from the other participants. (20 minutes)Tweet your SMART objectives using hashtag #netngopk
  • Debrief: (30 minutes)Participants will walk around and review the posters and add sticky notes with feedback. (10 minutes)As a group, we will do a gallery group, with the facilitator interviewing each organization about their SMART objective and facilitating feedback from the other participants. (20 minutes)
  • Tweet your SMART objectives using hashtag #netngopk
  • No details available
  • A home base is a place online that you own, that is your online ‘home’. Home is your web site or blog. Outposts are places that you have an online presence out in other parts of the web that you might not ‘own’. Outposts will mean different things to different NGOs – they select their outposts based on:-Their social media strategy-Their capacity – having an outposts takes time and effort – you want to do it well – it is better to engage deeply on one outpost and then spread yourself too thinThese ‘outposts’ are sites where you can:add contentbuild relationshipstest ideasgrow a profilelistenexperimentmake connectionstry to be usefulplayOut of this combination of activities many things come. Relationships, ideas, traffic, resources, partnerships, community and much more emerge from the outposts – much of it making yourhome base stronger.http://www.problogger.net/archives/2008/10/06/social-media-home-bases-and-outposts/
  • We are moving towards having the organization's web presence be less static information and more interactive or social. Not everyone needs a separate web site and a blog, some organizations consolidate. Free blogging platforms like blogger give you an easy way to update your content and if you already have a web site, you can easily add as an interactive part of your web site. You need to think about how to link or integrate your social media outposts. Benefits of a blog is that it helps with your search engine resultsEasy way to keep content updated and freshGives your NGOs brand visibility
  • NTEN is an organization that helps nonprofits and technology (http://www.nten.org).Their home Base (http://www.nten.org) is a web site, but they integrated a blog. They use the blog as an organizational newsletter and write about current events and activities. The blog is also shared on Facebook and Twitter and other social outposts. They also link to their social outposts on their web site.
  • Their blog content is also cross-posted on their Facebook page automatically. They get a lot of comments and conversations from their members because their members are on Facebook – and may not come to the web site to read the blog.
  • They also use their blog talk about the programs and summarize information about their members. They using a listening dashboard to monitor news and updates from their members and summarize them in a weekly blog post on their site.
  • On Twitter, they promote their members web sites as well as point back to content on their blog which is promoting their events.
  • Consist organizational brandingThis is the e-mediat blog from Morocco and it is using blogger which supporters three languages.. They use the e-mediat logo and colors consistently. The url includes the project name.Intuitive/ logical navigation and structureThe navigation bars are simple and clear. Notice that the “home” is on the far left and the “contact” is on the far right. The navigation bar for different languages is very clear and easy to use. They have also include a search button so content on the blog can be searched.Short content that is fresh and updated regularlyThey are posting regularly – news about the workshops and also including a series, like these the interviews with bloggers.Good visual designThe design is pleasing and uses a lot of white space.Links and integrates social outpostsThe blogger platform makes it easy to link to your social outposts.They also have included “share on facebook” and “tweet” widgets on each post – making the content easily shared by people who visit the blog.Sources:Web Site Check List:http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com/resources/online-marketing/10-point-basic-website-checklist-for-nonprofits/Effective Nonprofit Web Sites:http://gettingattention.org/articles/168/websites/effective-nonprofit-websites.htmlEffective Nonprofit Web Design:http://gettingattention.org/2010/06/nonprofit-website-content-above-the-fold.html 
  • Remember, home base can a web site or blog or combination. These are the principles for an effective presence.Sources: Add to the WikiWeb Site Check List:http://www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com/resources/online-marketing/10-point-basic-website-checklist-for-nonprofits/Effective Nonprofit Web Sites:http://gettingattention.org/articles/168/websites/effective-nonprofit-websites.htmlEffective Nonprofit Web Design:http://gettingattention.org/2010/06/nonprofit-website-content-above-the-fold.html 
  • image: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_dj7hueuj-U0/SzKOsC5LCyI/AAAAAAAABZ8/Um4e2Glzb60/s320/Tea+Cup.jpg
  • Content curation is the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information on the web and sharing the very best content with your audience.
  • http://www.contentmarketinginstitute.com/2011/09/food-pyramid-for-content-marketing/http://www.flickr.com/photos/oberazzi/974939987/in/photostream/A content strategy is the process of distributing created and curated content through different channels to reach your audience and move them to action to reach your goals. coordination, creativity, and curation.
  • Give a brief introduction
  • You can mix it up. You don’t have to create new content for every channel!
  • http://www.jarche.com/2010/10/network-learning-working-smarter/Seek: Is finding the information that is relevant to your social media objective and that your audience finds valuable.Sense: This is the process of creating a product based what you find. If we used the metaphor of a DJ, this is the play list. This could be as simple as an annotated link or a blog post.Share: This is the process of having a conversation with your audience about the content
  • It is important think about your content in terms of what you can plan ahead and what you need to be ready for when there is breaking news ..Breaking news – have to publish with short lead time – but you don’t have to be first. Quality comes first. There is a technique called “news-jacking”Newsjacking is piggy-backing on timely news or Meerman points out “the second paragraph of a news story.”    It is done by creating original content that takes advantage of timely events that are getting mainstream media attention and providing your organization’s view or take on the topic and sharing it with your audience, including journalists. Timely – Holidays, programs, events, and regular features “Facebook Fridays” – These should be in your editorial calendarAnytime – This is content related to your organization’s mission, can be about your organization or your topic area – but linked to a specific event. You can create this during slow times or have it on hand so it is efficient to share your content.Campaigns – This is content to support a specific organizational campaign.
  • Flickr Photo by drachenspinne & http://www.flickr.com/photos/sashamd/1413216979/
  • You need to plan out your content, ideally on a monthly basis.Many NGOs use an editorial calendar that is a simple spreadsheet that lists:-Date-Channel-Frequency-Content IdeaThe can be curated or created, but it has to be what your audience will respond to meet your objectives.Photo Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/peejeebee/4042966090/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/drydens/2349707107/sizes/l/in/photostream/You have to organize your ideas in a way that makes it easy to curate or create content
  • Get ideas and input from others, you don’t have to do it alone!
  • You can mix it up. You don’t have create new content for every channel!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/thelotuscarroll/sets/72157603809711727/with/2339070093/Be consistent – don’t share a bunch of content one day or one week and then stop for several weeks.
  • Photo of the Pakistani cricket team in a huddle from: SreelataYellamrazuReflection questions: How does your organization create content? What are the challenges to curating content?
  • Nearly everyone in Pakistan knows the character Gogi which is why I’m suggesting her as having a role in the ppt. She stands for women’s empowerment & social responsibility!eries of share pairsWhat was your biggest ah ha from the two days?What is still unclear?Leaders pair up with their social media person: What is the most important thing that you want the social media person to learn about over the next two days?

Transcript

  • 1. Becoming A Networked NGO Using Social Media Effectively Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyApril 16-19, 2012Dubai
  • 2. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Overnight Reflections What are some of your insights from yesterday? What are you most curious about learning today? Write it on a sticky note and add to wall
  • 3. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy IntroductionToday we are going to begin developing your effectivesocial media strategy!Successful social media depends on having an integratedsocial media strategy and applying principles of effectiveuse. All NGOs are at different levels of social mediapractice and the key to being effective is taking the rightnext small step. Social media is a new field and we’re alllearning best practices in real time.
  • 4. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Introduction AGENDA OUTCOMESIntroduction, Begin social mediaOverview & Icebreaker strategyPrinciples of Effective Social Media Be inspired and learn NGOs social mediaMaturity of Social Media Practice: storiesCrawl, Walk, Run, Fly Best practices for a strategic presence andInspiring NGO Success Stories from integrated contentPakistan and Beyond strategy FRAMINGSocial Media Strategy Practicum Balance of peer learning & expert sharingCreating A Strategic Presence and InteractiveIntegrated Content Strategy Fun! Don’t Be Shy!Reflection Laptops up/Laptops Down
  • 5. Post-Workshop SupportThe Wiki: What is there? How Do We Use It?
  • 6. Strategy Staff: Follow UpDate/Time Who ContentMay 23, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Policy Questions8:30 am Pakistan TimeMay 24, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project C9:00 am Pakistan TimeJune 25, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeJuly 10, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Strategy - Questions8:30 am Pakistan TimeAugust 30, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeOctober 4, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeNovember 1, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Strategy/Policy -8:30 am Pakistan Time CulminationNovember 1, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project Culmination9:00 am Pakistan Time
  • 7. Day Two: Strategy/Policy Communication Between Calls The Facebook Group The Facebook Grouphttps://www.facebook.com/groups/netngopk/
  • 8. Document Me to We Network on Facebook Group
  • 9. Day Two: About Your NGOsYour Communications Strategies Shorten these slides and also rethink the survey questions Ask the same questions in the exercise
  • 10. Greatest Value Using Social Media Can Bring to Your Organization4.5 43.5 32.5 21.5 10.5 0 Network & Relationship Collecting Feedback Stakeholder Involvement Disseminating Integrate with Existing Building (including Best Information Brick-and-Mortar Practices) Grassroots Programs
  • 11. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Brand Recognition and Reputation Raise Awareness Share Experiences/Best Practices Policy Partnerships Internal Communications across Borders Target Population notOtherwise Reached by Misison Mission-Related Objectives in Communication Plan
  • 12. Objectives relating to Education, Information & Engagement
  • 13. Action-related Objectives in Communications Plan OTHER •Sensitization •Information Sharing •Enthusing employees
  • 14. Who is their Audience?
  • 15. Who Are They Targeting? •CSR Representatives •Influential Leaders •Internal stakeholders - i.e organizations employees & the global partnership •Other partners and stakeholders in the field, including donors & researchers/academicia ns
  • 16. Geographic Audience
  • 17. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Icebreaker Combine this with the next slideAdd the image to the first day so people get to know the visual que for share pairs
  • 18. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Icebreaker – Share PairsWhat makes a communications strategy successful?• What made your most effective overall communications campaign work?• What did you do in the planning or implementation that lead to the success?• What’s needed for success?• What is the definition for success?
  • 19. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Icebreaker SummaryA social media strategy is most effective when integratedin your overall communications strategy – we call this“Multi-channel.”Knowing the definition for success and what works willhelp your social media be more effective. Alsounderstand how social media is different from traditionalcommunications techniques will help you be moresuccessful.
  • 20. How Integrated Strategy Works
  • 21. Key results generally include:• Increasing the movementsize by increasingmembership• Garnering attention fromall media through creativeengagements• Getting policies passed• Working with alignedpartner organizations• Increasing capacity
  • 22. Attention in An Age of Media Overload Traditional Social Tradigital Media OwnedSource: Steve Rubel
  • 23. Momsrising wanted to demonstrate to Congress that there was a grassrootsconstituency that supported Medicaid and dispel a misperception that whileMedicare has a strong constituency, Medicaid did not.
  • 24. • 500 Stories from 43 states• Curated best ones that illustrated their message• Repurposed across channels• 100K emails to congress
  • 25. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Twitter Break #netngopk
  • 26. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy• Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives• Monitors, listens, and researches the people in your network• Gets feedback and starts conversations about their work• Integrated Content Strategy: Create - Curate - Coordinate• Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread your mission• Scales social media by empowering everyone in Switch order, lead and the organization with the story first of integrating social into work flow a local organizations• Learns from: Experience - Data - Pilots
  • 27. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Pakistan Youth Alliance
  • 28. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPakistan Youth Alliance – additional examples.
  • 29. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #1Aligns social media with your communications strategy, results, audiences, and measurable objectives
  • 30. Day Two: Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy Alignment• What is your result?• Who do you want to reach? Results• What do you want them to do?• How will you measure success? • Awareness • Engagement • Education • Action S Specific M Measurable1. How many? A Attainable 2. By when? R Relevant T Timely
  • 31. KSWs mission is toproduce, present, andpromote art that empowersAsian American artists andcommunities.
  • 32. Focused on one channel (Facebook) to use bestpractices to:• Increase brand awareness RESULT: We went from 343 to 593 fans• Increase engagement RESULT: Our post feedback went up 269%• Increase participation of new people in classes and events RESULT: 10% new students /attenders say they heard about us through FacebookAudience: Artists and communityStrategy:• Show the human face of artists and remove the mystique• Get audience to share their favorites• Connect with other organizations
  • 33. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #2Monitors, listens, and researches the people in your network
  • 34. Most Have Baseline Tracking and Monitoring in Place Yes No
  • 35. Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy Listening – Uses A Dashboard
  • 36. Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy Brainstorm Keywords Listening: Knows Keywords • Nonprofit Name • Other nonprofit names in your space • Program, services, and event names • CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization • Other nonprofits with similar program names • Your brand or tagline • URLs for your blog, web site, online community • Industry terms or other phrases • Issue area, synonyms, geography • Your known strengths and weaknesses.
  • 37. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #3 Get feedback and start conversations about your work
  • 38. Engage: Conversation StartersAudience O BWhat are they saying that is relevant Jto/engages?LISTENING E CHow can you rework your message as a Tresponse or conversation starter? IFollow up Content Channels Vpoints E
  • 39. Principles of Social Media: Reflection What resonates? What is new?
  • 40. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #4 Integrated Content Strategy: Create, Curate, Coordinate
  • 41. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Gawaahi
  • 42. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Gawaahi
  • 43. He curates content related to hisorganization’s mission as an advocacyorganization dedicated to making children andfamilies a priority in federal policy and budgetdecisions. He writes blog posts using thelinks he curated.
  • 44. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #5Work with free agents, champions, and influencers to spread your mission
  • 45. Principle #5:How To Work With Champions Track: Who Are They? Recognize: Shout Outs, Tagging Cultivate: What do they want to do? Proposal/Tools: Ways to participate Engage and Amplify: Make it fun
  • 46. A Tweetathon was held on June 13th, aweek before World Refugee Day on June20th. Champions signed up to Tweet aboutthe refugee crisis and #bluekey. RoyaHosseini did a Twitter Chat.
  • 47. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #6Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow
  • 48. Why Important? Titles of People Managing •General Manager (and Manager) of Information and 25-50% Communication and Advocacy •Marketing and Communications Department •ICT Manager •IT “person” andLess than Communications and Advocacy “person”25% •Associate Coordinator No time Communication Unit •Advocacy and Communications Unit •Senior Manager Communications
  • 49. Day Two: Effective Social Media Strategy Pratham Books: Scales
  • 50. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Pratham Books: Scales
  • 51. Principles of Social Media: ReflectionHow can your NGO integrate social media tasks into staff jobs?
  • 52. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyPrinciples of an Effective Social Media Strategy Principle #7 Learns from experience, data, and pilots
  • 53. Most Are Not Using Measurement Techniques
  • 54. gristastic Ladder ‘o Engagement policy level discussions/calls to action personal calls to action stories of people making change fun on-rampsgrist sets the agenda by showing how green is reshaping our world. we cut through the noise and empower a new generation to make change.
  • 55. grist.org’s Key Results are:• Footprint: The reach of their activities, both online and offline• Engagement: Readers engage with their content• Individual Behavior Change: Impact on users behaviors, purchase decisions, and daily lives that are in line with sustainability• Societal Change: Impact on society, policy discussions, and conversations that advance sustainable practices.
  • 56. twitter chat: #sodawars quick and effective way to give content more legs
  • 57. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Principles of an Effective Social Media Strategy• Aligns social media with their communications strategy and measurable objectives• Monitors, listens, and researches the people in your network• Gets feedback and starts conversations about their work• Integrated Content Strategy: Create - Curate - Coordinate• Work with free agents , champions, and influencers to spread your mission• Scales social media by empowering everyone in the organization and integrating social into work flow• Learns from: Experience - Data - Pilots
  • 58. Day Two: Principles of Social MediaReflection Break:• What resonated?• What can be translated?• What ideas did you get for your• organization’s strategy?• What questions still remain?Write on a sticky and note andpost it on the wall. Make this into a “think and write”
  • 59. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Maturity of Social Media PracticeCrawl Walk Run Fly
  • 60. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Maturity of Social Media Practice Where is your organization at in accordance with this model? Crawl Walk Run Fly Scale Strategy Link Social or Integrated Strategy Integrated Multiple Program Emerging Tech Capacity ChannelsCommunication ObjectivesCulture Change Listening Engage Content Network Building Basics Small Pilots for Best Practices in Reflection, Insights Tactics, Tangible Continually Improve Results Results
  • 61. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Crawl, Walk, Run Fly – 4 CornersCRAWL WALK If you are crawling, what does it look like? What do you need to get to the next level? If you are walking, what does it look like? What do you need to get to the next level? If you are running, what does it look like? What do you need to get to the next level? If you are flying, what does it look like? FLY How can you keep flying? RUN
  • 62. BREAK!15 minutes to enjoy coffee, tea & snacks
  • 63. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyInspiring NGO Success Stories from Pakistan Campfire Stories! Photo: IYCF Pakistan
  • 64. Make the case studies match the frameworkHave each table or small group review the case studies and assign one for them toreflect and report onSet up – should be:What are the best practices?What ideas can you use for your strategy?
  • 65. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyLiving Case Study – Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crisis
  • 66. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyLiving Case Study – Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crisis
  • 67. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyLiving Case Study – Mama: Together for Safe Births in Crisis
  • 68. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Inspiring Case Study – Khudi
  • 69. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Inspiring Case Study – Khudi
  • 70. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Inspiring Case Study – Khudi
  • 71. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyInspiring Case Study – The Citizens Archive of Pakistan
  • 72. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyInspiring Case Study – The Citizens Archive of Pakistan
  • 73. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyInspiring Case Study – Citizens for Free & Responsible Media
  • 74. Day Two: Effective Social Media: StrategyInspiring Case Study – Citizens for Free & Responsible Media
  • 75. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Group Share from the Inspiring StoriesWhat did you identify as the best practices for each case study? What ideas did you get for your strategy?
  • 76. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Introduction to Social Media Practicum
  • 77. Lunch BreakEnjoy a buffet lunch over the next hour in The Promenade
  • 78. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Social Media Strategy PracticumLet’s begin planning your social media strategy!
  • 79. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Social Media Strategy PracticumSMART Objectives: Need to give them a Specific, Measureable, Attainable, worksheet that Relevant & Timely explains/defines SMART and what to do – incorporate the alignment slide here Photograph examples from Pakistan for future workshops Who is your target audience? What are your key metrics for success?
  • 80. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Social Media Strategy PracticumLet’s give our peers feedback!
  • 81. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Social Media Strategy Practicum Tweet your SMART objectives with #netngopk
  • 82. Day Two: Effective Social Media Strategic Online PresenceWhat is one thing you already know or want to learn about establishing an effective web presence?
  • 83. Social Strategy Should Integrate Online Presence and Content Strategy Informal Plan Formal Written Plan
  • 84. Home and Outposts Improve theexamples and the explanations Outpost Outpost Outpost Home Outpost Outpost Outpost
  • 85. Home Base: Blogs and Web Sites We are moving towards having the organizations webpresence be less static information and more interactiveor social. Not every NGO needs a separate web site anda blog, some organizations consolidate. The blog is part of the web site. Free blogging platforms like blogger give you an easy way to update your content and if you already have a web site, you can easily add it as an interactive part of your web site.You need to think about how to link or integrate your social media outposts.
  • 86. Examples: NTENhttp://www.nten.org
  • 87. Examples: NTEN Outposthttp://www.nten.org
  • 88. Examples: NTEN Blog http://www.nten.org
  • 89. Examples: NTEN – Outposthttp://www.nten.org
  • 90. An Effective Home Base for an NGO
  • 91. What Makes an Effective NGO Home Base? • Consistent organizational branding • Intuitive/ logical navigation and structure • Short content that is fresh and updated regularly • Good visual design • Links and integrates social outpostsSmall Group Exercise: Participants will work in groupsto evaluate their home base using the home baseworksheet. Better to do this pairs with NGOs – need toGroup Debrief: have a better slide to summarize the worksheet• What ideas did you get on how to improve your home base• What works well?• How might your organization integrate a blog?
  • 92. BREAK!15 minutes to enjoy coffee & tea
  • 93. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Creating an Integrated Content Strategy What is Content?
  • 94. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Creating an Integrated Content StrategyIntegrated Content Strategy: The coordinated process of distributing createdand curated content through different channels to reach your audience, andmove them to action to reach your goals. Creation Channels Audience Coordination Curation
  • 95. Content Strategy: 4 Simple Steps 3 41 2 Create Repurpose CurateOrganize
  • 96. Content Strategy: Share Pair• What step do you find the most challenging?• What step to you find the least challenging?
  • 97. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Content Curation Content curation is the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information on the weband sharing the very best content with your audience.
  • 98. Content Curation: How To Get Started SEEK SENSE SHAREFramework: Harold JarcheNetworked Learning Is Working Smarter
  • 99. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Creating an Integrated Content Strategy Who here doesdoes Content Curation? Who Content Curation? Photo: IYCF Pakistan 2011
  • 100. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Content Creation What Makes Great Content? Features News Where does it go?Highlights Breaking News NGO News BlogsReviewsStories Data FacebookCase Studies Reports Twitter How To Opinion NewslettersTips Idea PiecesTutorials Interviews WebsitesLists Opinion ReportsResources
  • 101. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Content CreationThink Of Your Content As Pieces of A Larger Whole
  • 102. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Organize ContentTool: The Editorial Calendar • Audience • Channel • Frequency What will you say? What does your audience want?
  • 103. Content Strategy: PlanYou must be organized! A few tools ….
  • 104. Content Strategy: Get Ideas from Others
  • 105. Content Strategy: Quality, Quality, Quality The quantity and speed does not matter…
  • 106. Content Strategy: Consistency
  • 107. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Creating an Integrated Content Strategy Organizing Your Content: Editorial Calendar
  • 108. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Creating an Integrated Content StrategyBrainstorm! Create a month of content for your organization Debrief: How would you introduce this into your organization?
  • 109. Strategy Staff: Follow UpDate/Time Who ContentMay 23, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Policy Questions8:30 am Pakistan TimeMay 24, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project C9:00 am Pakistan TimeJune 25, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeJuly 10, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Strategy - Questions8:30 am Pakistan TimeAugust 30, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeOctober 4, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project9:00 am Pakistan TimeNovember 1, 2012 Strategy Staff Social Media Strategy/Policy -8:30 am Pakistan Time CulminationNovember 1, 2012 Social Media Staff Action Learning Project Culmination9:00 am Pakistan Time
  • 110. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy End of Day Reflection What is your biggest ah-ha moment over the past two days? What is the most important thing that you want the social media person to learn about over the next two days? Image by: Nigar Nazar, Gogi Studios
  • 111. Day Two: Effective Social Media: Strategy Debrief, Awards, and a Photo! What is your biggest ah ha from the last two days? What is still unclear? Leaders Pair Up with Social Media person: • What is the most thing you want the social media person to learn about over the next two days? Index Cards: • One thing you’ll put in practiceFull group debrief to hear this month. both sides • Ideas for experiment
  • 112. ADJOURNED! Have a wonderful evening.We will only be seeing some of you in the morning. To those departing, thank you for joining us!