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Council on Foundations
 

Council on Foundations

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  • Social media has broken free from the marketing and fundraising silos and is changing how nonprofits deliver programs, lead, manage, and even govern. Beth Kanter, one of the most influential women in technology, will show you what Networked Nonprofits do to create and adopt a networked mindset and organizational culture. http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/2928413885/sizes/l/in/set-72157603639863828/
  • Networks, Virus Joke I’ve worked in the nonprofit sector for the past 32 years as a trainer and capacity builder –working on how nonprofits reach their missions through the use of effective technology Been blogging since 2002 – author of Beth’s Blog, write about how nonprofits can leverage a networked approach for social change and use Social media tools. Named Visiting Scholar at the David and Lucile Packard Fdn in 2009 where I one of my projects was to co-author the book, The Networked Nonprofit with Alison Fine Examples - -Capacity Building in the Middle East
  • A lot of ideas transcend
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words. Founder and CEO of Shabakat , Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat , translates into the word “network.” Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/ ounder and CEO of Shabakat , Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat , translates into the word “network.” Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/soyignatius/5544750526/sizes/l/in/photostream/ The  Parkinson’s Association  is doing just that.   They have organized a fundraiser called “ Summit4Stemcell .”  The goal is to fund  non-embryonic stem cell research  that will result in a treatment for Parkinson’s while inspiring people with the disease to move beyond their physical limitations.     A group of 17 passionate mountain climbers is raising money for this project by climbing Mt. Kiilimanjaro (19,340 ft high!) in September. You might be wondering why I’m writing about this?  It’s personal. My cousin,  Rebecca Kanter  (a millennial) is one of the climbers.   She is doing the climb in honor of my  Dad  who is suffers from Parkinsonism – there is no cure.    You can treat the symptoms and my Dad is working very hard on doing physical therapy which has allowed him to walk, with a walker.    Having been a competitive swimmer and  surfer , he knows the discipline of working hard for a goal.  It was not unlike how he has worked hard as a doctor and  in the Navy during WW2 . Here’s why Rebecca is taking on this challenge   Uncle Earl has Parkinsonism, and was in the hospital for his health-related issues. His family has since brought him home, but as my father described to me, they’re having to make adjustments to the house to accomodate my uncle’s physical challenges. Listening to the NPR report, especially the voices of the people (who I would later learn were Ken and Brad) taking on this enormous undertaking of sumitting Kilimanjaro while dealing with Parkinson’s, made me think about my Uncle Earl, the challenges he is facing in his life, and the opportunities — like summiting a mountain — that are no longer available to him. I was overwhelmed by the inspiration to do something.
  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile … Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live. Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/porternovelli/3212919866/sizes/l/in/set-72157611483862906/
  • The transition of how a nonprofit goes from institution to looking like and working more like a network is what our book is about The transition isn’t an easy, flip a switch – and it happens – it takes time Some nonprofits, newer ones like Mom’s Rising have networked nonprofit in their DNA, while others – institutions – make the change slowly. Way of being transforms into a way of doing
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/file/view/CFSCC_SocialMediaPolicy_08%2017%2011.pdf
  • Trust is cheaper than control Tell story
  • It is a good idea to have some formal community participation guidelines for the Facebook which are similar to online community guidelines. These can be a brief and simple reminder about civility and respect and deleting in appropriate comments.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook. A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • But along with these traditional means of public discourse and public relations a newer, louder mouthpiece inserted itself into the debate – social media, particularly Facebook. A torrent of vitriolic Facebook updates, both on the DSO page as well as the musician’s newly formed page, began to rain down like fire-tipped arrows as the two sides failed to come to an agreement. After some time, there was a sense that the Symphony had lost its footing in the battle over the hearts and minds of its community. Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • Ethan Allen, orchestra librarian and card-carrying member of the musician’s union, is the administrator of the musicians’ Facebook page. He says that it was a slow process getting their social media presence organized (the musicians also maintain a website and Twitter account), but once they were up and running it became a huge help in their cause. “Television news and newspapers write what they want, mostly one-sided,” says Allen. “Now we were able to get our message out to so many people.”
  • The musicians were able to organize some 15 concerts – some free, some fundraisers, and many of them sellouts. The group mobilized 200 – 300 people to demonstrate at a recent Symphony board meeting. And they were able to shut down many of the ongoing, non-orchestral, programs at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Hall, as many out of town musicians refused to cross the picket line. Clearly, social media has emerged as a powerful mobilizing tool, particularly for issues like labor disputes, where political passions run high.
  • Not only were many of the updates on the Symphony’s Facebook page negative, the musicians created their own Facebook page that soon surpassed the Symphony’s in number of fans.
  • The bitter, six-month strike cancelled 75 percent of the orchestra’s season, and “left deep institutional scars while symbolizing a turbulent era of change and economic uncertainty among American orchestras,” according to the Detroit Free Press . It’s hard not to believe that some of those scars cut deeper because of the widespread use of Facebook as a platform for the debate. The lightening fast, and sometimes anonymous, postings at times seemed to fuel the fire rather than clarify a position.
  • [social media] is a conversation. It’s not a war or a monologue.” When things go wrong – and things will go wrong – Andresen has several rules of thumb that organizations should live by: Listen. Monitor your online presence. Hear what people are saying about you. Use Google Alerts or search Twitter for mentions of your organization When you find something wrong or inaccurate, first look at who’s saying it and how big the audience is. This will help determine if a response is needed. Err on the side of engagement. Act quickly, on the spot, in the same medium where the problem first surfaced. This kind of thinking is a psychological shift for many, says Hoffman of See3 Communications. The use of social media forces nonprofits to engage as a member of a community in a way they may not yet be used to. More and more, constituents and donors expect immediacy and accountability in their relationships to nonprofits. Hoffman says we are living in the age of a new kind of transparency. And this is changing the way organizations need to do business. “People realize that anyone with a phone can do all this!” says Hoffman. Unfortunately, he says, most organizations haven’t caught up with this notion.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarhiccuphiccup/4612331648/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shuri_/5736150735/
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  • The guy in the t-shirt, a free agent These are people like Mark Horvath, Shawn Ahmed and many others .. Who want to work with nonprofits …
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigtallguy/139143816/ We wrote this book because we saw a landscape of free agents and nonprofit fortresses crashing into one another ….
  • We witnessed this collision first hand during our session on the Networked Nonprofit at the NTEN NTC Conference as Shawn’s frustration with traditional organizations spilled over. He grabbed the microphone to address the room full of nonprofit professionals and said, “the problem isn’t social media, the problem is that YOU are the fortress. Social media is not my problem: I have over a quarter million followers on Twitter , 10,800 subscribers on YouTube, and 2.1 million views. Yet, despite that, I have a hard time having you guys take me seriously . “ : I have over a quarter million followers on Twitter , and 2.1 million views on YouTube. I have a hard time having you guys take me seriously .
  • He turned and pointed a finger at Wendy Harman from the Red Cross who was in the room. He told the room full of nonprofits staffers ….. When the Haiti earthquake struck, I contacted the Red Cross. I offered to connect the community supporting my work with your efforts in Haiti. But I was dismissed as ‘just a guy on YouTube’”.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
  • Amy Boroff (@njdevmgr), development manager for Junior Achievement of NJ in Princeton [emphasis added], discovered one of her new Twitter followers was Kate Specchio (@ecsfoundation), co-founder of Morris County-based The Emily C. Specchio Foundation. Through their tweets, Amy recognized the potential for working together. They continued to communicate on Twitter in real-time, after working hours, to learn more about each respective organization. After several weeks, JANJ submitted a proposal to ECS for funding for an inaugural event: the Women's Future Leadership Forum. The ECS Foundation accepted the proposal and granted funds to help support aspiring female high school students become future leaders.
  • http://disruptology.com/10-social-media-tasks-for-summer-interns/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photo http://www.slideshare.net/jeremiah_owyang/career-social-strategist?from=embeds/jeremiah_owyang/5162385707/ The culture of a company directly influences how they develop their organizational formation. We identified five models for how companies organize for social media, and asked Social Strategists how they’re currently formed. Nearly 60% of surveyed Social Strategists classified their organizational model as “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke” (also known as “Dandelion”), in which a central hub provides guidance, resources and coordination to business units (See Figure 5). We found that 82% of those in these organizational models had reached sophistication, self-identifying their programs as Formalized, Mature, or Advanced. Expect more companies to model in either “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke,” as these formations are best equipped to scale to meet demands from both internal and external stakeholders 4
  • Rewards learning and reflection Try it and fix it approach – fail fast Appreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caring Trusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidly
  • Rewards learning and reflection Try it and fix it approach – fail fast Appreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caring Trusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidly http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Vo4M4u5Boc Fail:  Some experiments bomb.    Momrising staff gives themselves permission to kill each other’s projects  or tactical ideas that were brilliant at the time but simply don’t work.  They do this with humor to remove the failure stigma and call it a “ Joyful Funeral ”  Before they bury the body, they reflect on why it didn’t work. Any staff person can call a Joyful Funeral on anyone else’s idea. Incremental Success Is Not A Failure:  They do a lot of experiments and set realistic expectations for success.   Many times victories happen in baby steps.   They know from experience that many of their campaigns that incorporate social media lead to incremental successes, small wins or small improvements. Soaring Success :     Some experiments, actions, or issues will see dramatic results – beyond the organization’s wildest dreams.   For example, an interactive educational video ended up garnering over 12 million views and hundreds of comments and lead to thousands of new members signing up or taking action. Kristen says, “That type of success does not happen every day, but we need to try for that kind of success every day. We can only do it if we kill things that don’t work.”  They also analyze game changing successes to make sure it can be replicated or wasn’t an accident. Momsrising also understands that learning leads to success. Fail: Some experiments bomb.    Momrising staff gives themselves permission to kill each other’s projects  or tactical ideas that were brilliant at the time but simply don’t work.  They do this with humor to remove the failure stigma and call it a “ Joyful Funeral ”  Before they bury the body, they reflect on why it didn’t work. Any staff person can call a Joyful Funeral on anyone else’s idea. Incremental Success Is Not A Failure: They do a lot of experiments and set realistic expectations for success.   Many times victories happen in baby steps.   They know from experience that many of their campaigns that incorporate social media lead to incremental successes, small wins or small improvements. Soaring Success :     Some experiments, actions, or issues will see dramatic results – beyond the organization’s wildest dreams.   For example, an interactive educational video ended up garnering over 12 million views and hundreds of comments and lead to thousands of new members signing up or taking action. Kristen says, “That type of success does not happen every day, but we need to try for that kind of success every day. We can only do it if we kill things that don’t work.”  They also analyze game changing successes to make sure it can be replicated or wasn’t an accident. What are your organization’s key results?  What are the best metrics to measure those?  How do you use this data to guide design and implementation of your communications strategies?
  • Their key results generally include: • increasing the movement size by increasing membership • garnering attention from all media through  creative engagements • getting policies passed • working with aligned partner organizations • increasing capacity
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
  • “ I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said. Rewards learning and reflection Try it and fix it approach – fail fast Appreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caring Trusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidly It is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • Steve Norris, ex-Tory Mayoral contender and adviser to Boris Johnson, says: “Not only do I not want the Southbank Centre to be listed — I think the National Theatre should have a Compulsory Demolition Order!” The Londoner, however, has a soft spot for Sir Denys Lasdun’s National. So there.