Compasspoint: Silicon Valley Peninsula Nonprofit Forum

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rg-b/3243840206/
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  • Free Agents and Nonprofits in A Networked World
  • SHABAKAT youth integrate information and communication technologies in the day-to-day lives of their communities to positively transform our families, education, businesses, environment and community. Rami Al-Karmi will share a few words.Founder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
  • http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-day2/ounder and CEO of Shabakat, Al Ordon (JordanNet) and is serving as the E-Mediat Strategic Adviser for the Jordan In-Country Team shared some lessons about working as networked ngo. His organization’s name, Shabakat, translates into the word “network.”Shabakat Al Ordon trains young people in technical, professional and facilitation skills who then go out and create programs to train people in their communities. Rami shared how his organization works in a transparent way, open sourcing its program materials and processes. They also work many different partners to spread the program so that his organization isn’t doing everything. They’ve simplified and focused on what they do best.
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  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile …Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ANboUjG6GQ&feature=player_embeddedFacebook has become a forum to get people’s questions answered about public healthIf someone asks a question, and they didn’t get to it in time – other people answer itBooking an appointment, couldn’t make it appointment, taking two weeksAsking people for advicePaying attentionQuestion about the two different types of flu vacines ..Person answered, manager put a clarifying answer onTwitter: Helpful, esp. with h1n1 – real-time input – real time conversation, get people’s updates fastConversation – re: h1n1 – help me understand why it is so much more dangerous than regular flu?Helpful to reach reporters – first day h1n1 – fox 13 was camped outside city clinic – getting people to go another clinicReporter had tweeted he was sitting outside at one – and she suggested an alternativeSee you thereDid not take any effort
  • http://pulseandsignal.com/interview/salt-lake-valley-health-department-one-year-later/
  • Our social media strategy focuses on brand awareness and engagement and is part of an integrated communications strategy.    We spend time identifying and building relationships with  super-advocates online and engage them — similar to the way you engage major donors or champion advocacy constituents. “but we are seeing social media become very important in helping with public policy efforts – like the recent Child Nutrition Bill.   We saw a lot of interest and click thrus from Twitter particularly.” They used Google Analytics to see where traffic is coming from specifically to their advocacy pages surrounding the bill and looked at Twitter retweets.
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  • So November (diabetes awareness month) is over and the Big Blue Test event we held this year is also behind us. We are so proud and happy about the results that I wanted to share them here, so we could all celebrate together as a TuDiabetes family!Maybe you know the story by now, but in case you don't, the video has accumulated more than 123,000 views and we passed 100,000 views some time between Nov. 13 and Nov. 14 (depending on where in the world you live). So we reached the goal!As a result of this, Roche will soon be sending their donation of $75,000 to the Diabetes Hands Foundation. Of these funds, $74,000 will be regranted to two charities:* Half will go to Insulin For Life.* The other half, to International Diabetes Federation, earmarked for their Life for a Child program.Both are humanitarian programs that assist children with diabetes in need in third world countries (at times, Insulin For Life works with Life For a Child to source particular needs). Based on their past record track and their past financial reports, we estimated that roughly each of the first 100,000 views (the ones that counted towards the donation) translated into approximately one week's worth of insulin given to a child in need.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photohttp://www.slideshare.net/jeremiah_owyang/career-social-strategist?from=embeds/jeremiah_owyang/5162385707/The culture of acompany directly influences how they develop their organizational formation. Weidentified five models for how companies organize for social media, and asked SocialStrategists how they’re currently formed. Nearly 60% of surveyed Social Strategistsclassified their organizational model as “Hub and Spoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke”(also known as “Dandelion”), in which a central hub provides guidance, resources andcoordination to business units (See Figure 5). We found that 82% of those in theseorganizational models had reached sophistication, self-identifying their programs asFormalized, Mature, or Advanced. Expect more companies to model in either “Hub andSpoke” or “Multiple Hub and Spoke,” as these formations are best equipped to scale tomeet demands from both internal and external stakeholders4
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  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • “I made a mistake.”   Those are hard words for some people to utter when there has been a screw up and they’re responsible for it.   It is especially hard given the blame game culture that exists in most workplaces and work relationships.  That’s where people are quick to point a finger at you and make you feel shame.  After all, nothing focuses the mind as like a hanging as Samuel Johnson once said.Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • Compasspoint: Silicon Valley Peninsula Nonprofit Forum

    1. The Networked Organization:Leveraging Social Media to Serve Your Mission<br />Beth Kanter, Visiting ScholarDavid and Lucile Packard FoundationBreaking-Through with What WorksSilicon Valley/Peninsula Nonprofit Forum 2011<br />
    2. The Networked Organization<br />AGENDA<br />OUTCOMES<br /><ul><li> Introduction/Ice Breaker
    3. Overview of Networked Nonprofit Framework
    4. Theme 1: Social Culture
    5. Theme 2: Simplicity
    6. Theme 3: Public Learning
    7. Reflection</li></ul>Leave the room with a basic understanding of being a networked organization and one small step<br />FRAMING<br /><ul><li>Senior Leaders
    8. Interactive
    9. http://bit.ly/svp-np-forum</li></li></ul><li>Photo by sveeta<br />Be warned: Don’t just sit back and passively listen<br />
    10. Share Pairs<br />
    11. Speedy Introductions<br />Name, Title, Organization<br />Two words that come to mind when you think about social media and your nonprofit organization<br />Flickr Photo by John K <br />Report: Popcorn and Twinkle<br />
    12. Quick Poll<br />RoleType of Org<br />How many are monitoring what people say on social channels about your organization or issue area?<br />How many have a social media policy?<br />Does your organization use ….<br />Facebook, Twitter.Blog.YouTube<br />Other<br />
    13. Networked NGOs in the Arab World<br />
    14. “When the technology becomes boring, it becomes socially interesting …” Clay Shirky<br />The connectedness of living in a networked, mobile world has become more a part our daily lives. <br />These disruptive technologies are having a profound impact on the way arts organizations do their work, communicate with audiences, and programs.<br />Remember: Disruption is can be our friend ….. <br />
    15. Not at all<br />Very<br />How comfortable are you personally social media?<br />Social media can help us achieve results that support our mission<br />No<br />Not sure<br />Yes<br />Human Spectragram<br />
    16. What is a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
    17. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
    18. Always moving forward in social media practice….<br />Integrated Social Media Strategy<br />EngagementIntegrated Content<br />Best Practices Tactics<br />Build Capacity<br />Multiple Channels<br />Institutionalized<br />Network Building<br />Measurement/KPI<br />Reflection/Improvement<br />Marketingor Audience Development<br />Plan<br />Culture Change<br />Social Media Strategy<br />SMART Objectives<br />Audience<br />Listening<br />Experiments/Pilots<br />Based on Visiting Scholar, Packard Foundation, 2010<br />
    19. Benefits<br />Value<br />Costs<br />Math<br />The ROI Puzzle<br />
    20. Executive Directors and Pot Hole Problem<br />
    21. What were the results? What’s the value?<br />How much time?<br />Photo by edyson<br />
    22. ROI: Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly<br />Results<br />Impact<br />$<br />Investment<br />Interaction<br />Insight<br />Number of Months Strategy, Measure, Improve<br />
    23. Local Copy<br />Youtube Video<br />
    24. “People regard our program as honest and informative. After almost two years on the social media front, we’ve developed a good system to get timely and accurate public health messaging to our communities. We firmly believe that our presence on social media sites has really enhanced our communication with the media and public.<br />Executive Director, Gary Edwards said it best in our 2010 Annual Report; that during tough economic times, SLVHD rose to the occasion and found innovative, cost effective ways to communicate with our community. “ - VannaLivaditis, New Media Coordinator<br />
    25. Objectives:1.    To promote Independent Sector with “non-attending audiences” through attendees’ social media mentions2.    To capture summaries of the 2010 conference to show the richness of the content as a means to promote the event for 20113.    To test pilot social media at the conference and to capture lessons learned and ideas for future social media efforts<br />Metrics for Success1.    Seven bloggers and seven Tweeters are identified and recruited to cover the event2.    Content from seven sessions is posted to the IS blog or other blogs3.    The number of retweets using the hashtag #ISconf increases from 20094.    The team gains social media  experience and insights about social media practice <br />Crawl<br />
    26. Social Media strategy is part of integrated communications strategy.<br />Track Awareness: Share of Conversion About Hunger<br />Conversions for advocacy <br />(Child Nutrition Bill) and donations<br />Cross Department Dashboard<br />KPI: Linked to Job Performance<br />FLY<br />
    27. Share Pair: What resonated? What insights did you gain that you can apply to your organization? What have you thought about before?<br />
    28. Theme 1: Social Culture<br />
    29. Conversation starters, not stoppers<br />
    30. Sharing control of branding and marketing messages<br />Dealing with negative comments<br />Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)<br />Make mistakes<br />Make senior staff too accessible<br />Privacy and security concerns<br />Perception of wasted of time and resources <br />Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more<br />
    31. The Rule Book: Social Media Policy<br /><ul><li> Encouragement and support
    32. Why policy is needed
    33. Cases when it will be used, distributed
    34. Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    35. Guidelines
    36. Identity and transparency
    37. Responsibility
    38. Confidentiality
    39. Judgment and common sense
    40. Best practices
    41. Tone
    42. Expertise
    43. Respect
    44. Quality
    45. Additional resources
    46. Training
    47. Operational Guidelines
    48. Escalation
    49. Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com</li></ul>Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group<br />
    50. Pilot Road Show<br />Low Risk Experiments: Did anything bad happen?<br />
    51. One Minute Reflection: What does your nonprofitorganization need to do to become more social?<br />
    52. You want me to start Tweeting too? <br />Simplicity: From scarcity to abundance …<br />
    53. Leverage the Network <br />
    54. Who will do the work?<br />
    55. Want to see the video?<br />Volunteers and Interns<br />
    56. Integrate into job description<br />
    57. Wendy Harman<br />Director, Social Media<br />Create ROI MeasurementsDevelop Internal Education and Training<br />Apply Social Insights to the Strategic Plan<br />Get Buy-In from Stakeholders<br />Develops Listening and Monitoring Strategy<br />Gets Tools and Technologies in place<br />Facilitate policy and procedures<br />Community manager<br />Two Full-Time Staff Members<br />
    58. Strategy for Scale: Internal/External<br />
    59. Share Pair:What could your organization do less of to allow for more capacity to implement social media? How will your organization do the work? <br />
    60. Handling Mistakes<br />x<br />“MisTweet” – A tweet intended to come from a personal account but sent out on an organizational account by mistake. <br />
    61. This “MisTweet” by a Red Cross employee was out for an hour before Wendy Harman got a call in the middle of the night.<br />
    62. Disaster recovery on the tweet …. <br />
    63. Apologized and share on their blog<br />
    64. Employee confessed on Twitter<br />
    65. Got picked up by mainstream media and blogs<br />
    66. What are your takeaways about social media mistakes from this story?<br /><ul><li>You can’t hide or not respond
    67. Act quickly
    68. Admit the mistake, stakeholders are forgiving
    69. Use humor when appropriate
    70. Build your network before you need it
    71. Employees should use different Twitter apps for personal/organizational tweeting
    72. If the mistake had been damaging to the organization, a social media policy would have been critical if taking appropriate action</li></li></ul><li>Reflection and Raffle<br />What is one idea that you can put into practice?<br />What resources do you need to be successful?<br />What are the challenges?<br />What is one small step you can take tomorrow? <br />
    73. Thank you<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />

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