How the Other Half Lives
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

How the Other Half Lives

  • 648 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
648
On Slideshare
648
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Essential QuestionWhat were some of the living and working conditions during the late 1800s, and what did people do to try to improve those circumstances?
  • 2. Early industrial labor system in whichworkers produced goods at home.
  • 3. Mrs. Battaglia with Tessie, age 12 and Tony, age 7 work athome on a Saturday. Earn from $1 to $1.50 for the day.
  • 4. Family and neighbors working at night sewing garters.
  • 5. Method of production in which goodsare made by workers and machines inone location (a factory) outside theirhomes.
  • 6. 9pm in an Indiana glass factory
  • 7. Oyster shuckers working in a canning factory. Began at 3:30am and worked to 5pm.
  • 8. Mill Girl, Lancaster, S.C., November 30, 1908
  • 9. 1) What is “progress”?2) What is the best way to make progress?3) What should the government do to improve society?4) Is there a need for more government involvement?5) Is there a need for more private competition?6) What should business do to improve society?7) What should “common” people do to improve society?8) Do Americans need the government to protect them from corporate abuse?
  • 10. Home of Andrew Carnegie, New York, NY, c1903
  • 11. Carnegie Steel Company,“Lucy” furnace, Pittsburgh, PA Carnegie blast furnaces, Between 1900-1915 Homestead, PA 1905
  • 12. Carnegie LibrariesCarnegie Library,Montgomery, ALc1906 Carnegie Library, Tuskegee Institute c1906
  • 13. Carnegie Libraries Carnegie library,Washington, D.C. c1906 Carnegie Library, Burlington, VT c.1907
  • 14. Carnegie Libraries Carnegie had two main reasons for donating money to the founding of librariesFirst, he believed that libraries added to the meritocraticnature of America. Anyone with the right inclination anddesire could educate himself.Second, Carnegie believed that immigrants like himselfneeded to acquire cultural knowledge of America; which thelibrary allowed immigrants to do.
  • 15. Residential street, Chicago, c. 1901. A backyard shared by five houses, Chicago, c. 1910.
  • 16. Packinghouses c. 1909. Making sausage
  • 17. “Young Miners,”South Pittston PA, January 6, 1911 “Breaker boys,” Hughestown Borough Coal Co. Pittston, PA
  • 18. Residence of Cornelius Vanderbilt, New York, NY, 1901 Vanderbilt Hall, Yale College, New Haven, CN, 1901
  • 19. Adolescent girls from Bibb, Mfg. Co. in Georgia
  • 20. Young cigar makers in Engelhardt and Co.
  • 21. Mill workers mending broken threads on bobbins.
  • 22. John D. Rockefeller’sresidence, Cleveland, OH, c1908 Forest Hill Lodge, entrance to Rockefeller’s home, Cleveland, OH, c1905
  • 23. Rockefeller Hall, Brown University Rockefeller Hall, Vassar College
  • 24. Breakerboys – Pennsylvania Coal Company Young Driver - West Virginia, September 1909.
  • 25. Francis Lance, 5 years old,jumps on and off trolleys tosell newspapers. Tony Casale, 11, has been selling newspapers for four years.
  • 26. Breaker boys, Woodward Coal Mines,Kingston, PA, 1900
  • 27. Home of J.P. Morgan, New York, NY, 1907J.P. Morgan & Co.’s offices,[Drexel Building], New York, NY, 1905
  • 28. Striking workers rally at 47th and Ashland, Chicago, 1904.
  • 29. What is the definition of “democracy”?
  • 30. Do these pictures show a democratic society?
  • 31. What is the differencebetween a democratic and a capitalist society?
  • 32. In the early 1900s, some people wereconcerned that there were “people” withpower in the U.S. but that the majority ofthe “people” had no power.
  • 33. This is a Senate Of the MonopolistsBy the Monopolists and For the Monopolists
  • 34. Entrance forMonopolists
  • 35. People’sEntranceClosed
  • 36. 1) What is “progress”?2) What is the best way to make progress?3) What should the government do to improve society?4) Is there a need for more government involvement?5) Is there a need for more private competition?6) What should business do to improve society?7) What should “common” people do to improve society?8) Do Americans need the government to protect them from corporate abuse?
  • 37. Andrew Carnegie – was a strict Social Darwinist. He believed that accumulation of wealth by a few was inevitable in any capitalistic society. Further, this concentration of wealth in the hands of a few was necessary for democracy and freedom to prevail and for the whole of society to be prosperous. Anyattempt to circumvent this system would lead to anarchy and tyranny. However, Carnegie believed that those who did make it had amoral obligation to use their fortune to give back to society (The“Gospel of Wealth”). In particular, this money was to be spent in away that did not encourage laziness (charities that only dealt withsymptoms and not the problem) but that created institutions thatmade opportunities for anyone with the right character to besuccessful and rich. Carnegie gave money to build 2,509 libraries.
  • 38. Jacob Riis – became a policereporter in New York City,where he documented the grimrealities of tenement life. Hisdetailed accounts of the city’spoor and of their struggles atwork and at home argued theneed for public housing and lawsto control landlords.
  • 39. Ida Tarbell – revealed the illegalmeans used by John D.Rockefeller to monopolize theearly oil industry in her mostfamous work, The History ofthe Standard Oil Company. Sheargued the need for the federalgovernment to enforce theSherman Anti-Trust Act andcontrol corruption.
  • 40. Jane Addams - was a selflessgiver of assistance to thepoor. She showed the needfor individual volunteers togive of their time andresources to aid thedowntrodden.
  • 41. The central questions are:Can society create a systemwith winners and no losers? & If so, how?
  • 42. In your opinion, which of these people (orsolutions) would have made the U.S. (around 1900) a more democratic society? •Carnegie - the wealthy should give back to the community. •Riis - need public housing and laws to control landlords. •Tarbell - government needs to enforce the Sherman Anti- Trust Act and control corruption. •Addams - individual volunteers must give of their time and resources to aid the downtrodden