Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Me retention12
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply
Published

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
111
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Kanaan  Kanaan   Portland  State  University  Middle  East  Student  Reten6on  Specialist  
  • 2. Quick Notes•  The  majority  of  M.E.  students  are  from  the  Gulf  countries  (GCC).    •   Cultural  adjustment  and  culture  shock  to  life  in  the  United  States  is   massive  for  them.  •   Many  are  guided  by  their  peers  –  a  paGern  that  can  lead  to  disastrous   results.  •   There  can  be  pressure  from  families  and  individual  cultural  missions  to   choose  a  career  path  that  may  not  work  for  the  student(s).  •   Some  students  bring  “baggage”  with  them  to  the  U.S.  (cultural,  tribal,   religious,  family  feuds,  etc.).  •   In  general,  this  genera6on  has  grown  up  indulged  and  privileged,  from   affluent  circumstances.  Most  students  have  not  needed  to  work  prior   to  coming  to  the  U.S.  They  have  been  dependent  on  their  families  for   their  livelihood.  
  • 3. Quick Notes•  This  privileged  lifestyle  leads  many  GCC  students  who  come  to   Portland  State  University  to  expect  to  be  served  here  in  the  same   manner  they’ve  grown  up  with  at  home.  Furthermore,  their  parents   send  them  to  PSU  with  the  expecta6on  that  faculty  and  staff  will  take   care  of  their  children  in  the  same  manner  as  they  have.  •  Local  and  global  poli6cs  back  home  play  a  major  role  in  how  these   students  behave  and  perceive  the  world  around  them.  They  were   brought  up  in  a  conserva6ve  society,  with  non-­‐democra6c  poli6cal   systems.  •  M.E.  students  are  passive  learners  due  to  the  way  educa6onal  systems   are  structured  in  their  home  countries.  
  • 4. Quick Notes•   There,  these  students  are  not  allowed  to  challenge  the  teacher  (who   represents  an  authority  figure)  or  think  independently  for  themselves.  •   They  have  been  indoctrinated  with  approved  material  by  their   governments.  Crea6ve  and/or  cri6cal  thinking  is  not  encouraged.  If   students  there  disagree  with  someone  in  a  posi6on  of  authority,  they   will  be  retaliated  against,  punished,  etc.  
  • 5. Quick Notes  There  is  a  lack  of:   There  is  an  inability  to:  •   Ambi6on,  mo6va6on   •  Adjust  to  college  and  academic  life  •   Seeing  the  “big  picture”   despite  comple6ng  IELP  •   Accessing  resources   •  Fully  understand  college  academic  •   Engagement   life,  focus,  be  inspired  and  take  •   Accountability   their  studies  seriously  •   Trust  and  having  faith  in  the   •  Enjoy  the  freedom  they  have  by   system   making  wise  choices;  alcohol  and  •   Self-­‐reliance  and  self-­‐assurance   substance  abuse  cases  are  not  •   Self-­‐confidence  and  a  sense  of   uncommon   purpose   •  Have  friendships  with  women  and  •   Understanding  legal  issues  and   understand  gender  equality   ramifica6ons   •  See  that  college  life  is  not  a  •   Planning  in  advance   vaca6on  in  the  U.S.   All  of  the  above  factors  contribute  to  the  reten6on  issues  we  have   experienced  when  serving  M.E.  students.  
  • 6. Why are undergraduate M.E. students leaving PSU?•  Low  IELS  scores.  •  Failing  IELP,  which  forces  them  to  aGend  other  English  language   schools.  In  repea6ng  the  same  basic  English  courses,  at  the  same   levels,  their  overall  academic  6meline  is  stretched  out.  This  can   result  in  suspension  of  their  scholarships  because  of  6me  limits.  •  Failing  and  repea6ng  sta6s6cs  classes  (the  Math  department  is  the   gateway  to  the  Schools  of  Business  Administra6on  and   Engineering).  •  Mul6ple  academic  warnings  and  lower  GPAs  while  enrolled  in   academic  courses  at  PSU  result  in  scholarship  suspensions.  •  Admission  restric6ons:  GPA  below  3.0  for  freshmen  and  below  2.25   for  transfer  students.  •  Cultural  adjustment  (one  of  the  major  factors  for  failing).  
  • 7. Why are potential M.E. graduate students leaving PSU?  •  Graduate  applica6on  restric6ons.  •  Not  enough  6me  and  skills  to  prepare  for  the  applica6on.  •  No  condi6onal  admission.  •  TOEFL  score  requirements  for  IELP  students.  •  GRE  requirements.  
  • 8. Goals  •  Inspire,  encourage,  engage,  empower,  s6mulate,  and  develop  leadership   skills.  •  Build  a  formalized  reten6on  program.  •  Create  consistency,  offer  clear  guidance,  and  streamline  students’  needs   with  a  wide  range  of  resources  and  connec6ons  with  the  community.  •  Create  core  M.E.  student  leader  posi6ons  for  students  who  can  serve  as   role  models  to  inspire  their  peers  to  have  high  academic  standards.  •  Provide  support,  build  trust,  and  make  these  students  feel  at  home  and   welcomed.  •  Build  personal  rela6onships  with  current  M.E.  students  –  they  represent   future  PSU  alumni.  •  Encourage  cultural  sharing  and  understanding,  i.e.,  aim  for  M.E.  students   to  understand  America’s  cultural  affinity  for  apple  pie  .  .  .or  the  humor  of   “Seinfeld.”  
  • 9. Successful Retention Strategy (Program) ➡ Posi6ve  Experience   ➡     Successful  Students   ➡     Loyal  Alumni    
  • 10. NAFSA numbersAssocia6on  of  Interna6onal  Educators  es6mates  that  foreign  students  and  their  dependents  contributed  approximately  $20.23  billion  to  the  U.S.  economy  during  the  2010-­‐2011  academic  year.  
  • 11. Net Contribution to State Economy by Foreign Students (2010-2011)
  • 12.  Contribution to State Economy by Foreign Students Dependents (2010-2011)
  • 13. Foreign Student Contribution from Tuition/ Fees and Living Expenses (2010-2011)M.E.  students  represent  roughly  1/3  of  PSU’s  interna6onal  student  popula6on.  
  • 14. CONFIDENTIAL  DRAFT   Summary  Proposal  for  M.E.  student  reten6on  project   3/29/2012    
  • 15. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project1-­‐  Recruitment  and  marke6ng  strategies,  and  pre-­‐arrival  orienta6on   in  Arabic  •  Market  PSU,  the  City  of  Portland,  and  Oregon  as  a  safe  and   welcoming  environment.  •  Interview  prominent  PSU  alumni  in  M.E.  countries  about  the  impact   PSU  has  had  on  their  lives  and  careers,  and  showcase  these   tes6monials  in  brochures,  on  video,  on  the  Web  site,  and  more.  •  Assist  in  pre-­‐university  decisions  and  registra6on/admission/ orienta6on.  •  Encourage  PSU  administra6on  at  high  levels  –  president,   chancellors,  etc.  –  to  par6cipate  in  communica6on  M.E.  cultural   missions.  
  • 16. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project2-­‐  FY-­‐Path  to  college     a-­‐  Life  Balance  •  Orienta6on  in  Arabic  •  Smooth  entry  into  American  college  life  •  Life  stability  •  Balanced  exposure  to  American  culture  (community   engagement  throughout  their  study  at  PSU/different  phases   in  different  years)  •  Housing  (food,  RAs  and  cultural  competence)  
  • 17. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project2-­‐  FY-­‐Path  to  college   b-­‐  Academic  Success  Starts  with  English  (IELP/ESL)  •  Con6nue  introductory  courses  offered  in  American   experience,  educa6onal  system  and  cultural  understanding.  •  Evaluate  progress  mid-­‐term,  each  term.  •  Create  and  staff  mentoring  and  tutoring  programs.  
  • 18. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project2-­‐  FY-­‐Path  to  college   c-­‐  College  Transi6on  •  Create  a  “hands-­‐on,”  in-­‐depth  course  that  addresses  American   life  and  culture,  as  well  as  American  law,  and  that  would  offer   extracurricular  volunteer  opportuni6es  for  students  to  get  an   “up  close  and  personal”  academic/working  experience.  This   course  builds  on  the  introductory  courses  offered.  •  Create  a  strategic,  long-­‐term  plan  of  ac6on/program  geared  to   improving  GPAs  and  preparing  students  for  college.  This   includes  an  academic  module  featuring  college  preparedness   courses.  
  • 19. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project2-­‐  FY-­‐Path  to  college   d-­‐  Professional  Development  and  Networking  •  Develop  professional  networks  with  U.S.  companies.  •  Arrange  for  leadership  training,  skills  training,  and  internships   or  OBT/CPT.  
  • 20. Summary Proposal for M.E. student retention project2-­‐  FY-­‐Path  to  college   e-­‐  Open  Graduate  Admission  Discussion   •  Help  students  with  applica6on  prepara6on.   •  Reserve  graduate  spots  for  interna6onal  students  by  gran6ng           condi6onal  admission.   •  Remove  TOEFL  requirements  and  subs6tute  with  full   comple6ons  from  IELP.   •  Make  adjustments  to  IELP  classes  to  accommodate  for  graduate   students.   •  Prepare  students  for  GRE  or  GMAT.