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Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
Chapter4 job costing
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Chapter4 job costing

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  • 1. CHAPTER 4Job Costing
  • 2. Basic Costing Terminology Several key points from prior chapters:  Cost Objects – anything for which a measurement of costs is desired.  Direct Costs and Tracing – costs related to a particular cost object that can be traced in an economically feasible way. (i.e. materials and labor)  Indirect Costs and Allocation – costs related to a particular cost object that cannot be traced in an economically feasible way. (overheads)
  • 3. Basic Costing Terminology Cost Pool – a grouping of individual cost items. That is; Direct material, Direct manufacturing labor and manufacturing overhead costs. Cost-allocation Base – i) a cost driver is used as a basis upon which to build a systematic method of distributing indirect costs. OR ii) ways to allocate costs to different products.
  • 4. Costing Systems Job-Costing system: accounting for distinct cost objects called Jobs. Each job may be different from the next, and consumes different resources.  Medicines, aircraft, advertising. As the products and services are distinct, job costing systems accumulate costs separately for each product or service. Process-Costing system: accounting for mass production of identical or similar products.  Oil refining, juice.
  • 5. Costing Approaches Actual Costing –It allocates indirect costs based on theactual indirect cost rates (X) the actual activity consumption Normal Costing – allocates:Indirect costs based on thebudgeted indirect-cost rates (X) the actual activity consumption Both methods allocate indirect costs to a cost object the same way: by using INDIRECT-cost rates (X) actual consumption
  • 6. Seven-step Job Costing1. Identify the Job that is the chosen cost object.2. Identify the Direct Costs of the Job (DM/DL).3. Select the Cost-Allocation base(s) to use for allocating Indirect Costs to the Job.4. Match Indirect Costs to their respective Cost-Allocation bases.5. Calculate an Overhead Allocation Rate: • Budgeted OH Costs ÷ Budgeted OH Allocation Base. • Actual OH Costs ÷ Actual OH Allocation Base.6. Allocate Overhead Costs to the Job: • OH Allocation Rate x Actual Base Activity For the Job.7. Compute Total Job Costs by adding all direct and indirect costs together.
  • 7. Journal Entries Journal entries are made at each step of the production process The purpose is to have the accounting system closely reflect the actual state of the business, its inventories and its production processes. All Product Costs are accumulated in the Work-in- Process Control account  Direct Materials used  Direct Labor incurred  Factory Overhead allocated or applied Actual Indirect Costs (overhead) are accumulated in the Manufacturing Overhead Control account
  • 8. Accounting for Overhead Recall that two different overhead accounts were used in the preceding journal entries:  Manufacturing Overhead Control was debited for the actual overhead costs incurred.  Manufacturing Overhead Allocated was credited for estimated (budgeted) overhead applied to production through the Work-in-Process account.  If Overhead Control > Overhead Allocated, this is called Under allocated Overhead  If Overhead Control < Overhead Allocated, this is called Over allocated Overhead
  • 9. Adjusting the Over/Under applied SituationsWrite-Off Approach – the difference is simply writtenoff to Cost of Goods Sold. Under allocated over head: added in cost of goodssold. Over allocated over head: subtracted from cost ofgoods sold.

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