Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
1
Multipl...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
2
because...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
3
intelli...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
4
best wa...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
5
differe...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
6
intelli...
Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching
Kamila Bohacova
Goddard College
PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013
7
Gardner...
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Multiple intelligences and teaching

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Multiple intelligences and teaching

  1. 1. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 1 Multiple Intelligences; New Horizons It is of the utmost importance that we recognize and nurture all of the varied human intelligences, and all of the combinations of intelligences. We are so different largely
  2. 2. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 2 because we all have different combinations of intelligences. If we recognize this, I think we will have at least a better chance of dealing appropriately with the many problems that we face in the world. – Howard Gardner A Harvard psychologist named Howard Gardner proposed in the book Multiple Intelligences; New Horizons the existence of at least seven basic intelligences. Most recently, he added an eight. In his theory of multiple intelligences, Gardner seeks to broaden human potential beyond the confines of an IQ score. He opposes the idea that intelligence can be measured simply by a score and suggests that intelligence has more to do with the capacity to solve problems and being productive in a rich and naturalistic setting. I have presented the eight intelligences through a visual presentation (Prezi) that accompanies this essay. As a current student and future educator, learning about the different types of intelligences is beneficial to me in understanding the different learning styles of the children I plan to teach. In addition to understanding learning styles, knowing and understanding how different people learn is essential in creating a curriculum and lessons that adhere to all learning styles. The multiple intelligence theory provides knowledge by looking through different lenses on the potentials and abilities people possess. It is important to remember that each person has the capacities in all eight intelligences. Gardner suggests that most people can develop each intelligence to an adequate level of competency. Intelligences are always interacting with each other. For example, a student is asked to perform an experiment in science class. First, the student must read the directions, which involves the use of his linguistic
  3. 3. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 3 intelligence. Second, the student must measure the appropriate amounts of materials needed to perform the experiment, representing his logical-mathematical intelligence. Third, the student must physically conduct the experiment in which involvement of his bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is required. If the student is working alone, intrapersonal intelligence is present, and if working in a group, interpersonal intelligence is present. In just one lab experiment, the student presents multiple intelligences that he utilizes. In addition, there are many ways to be intelligence within each category. There is no standard set of attributes that one must have to be considered intelligent. For example, a person may not be able to read well, yet be highly linguistic because he can tell a terrific story or possesses a large oral vocabulary. Similarly, a person may be a terrible basketball player, yet possess superior bodily-kinesthetic intelligence when weaving a scarf or planting flowers. It is important for teachers to not classify students with just one or two intelligences and to understand that they are able to learn everything at a basic level of competency. Also, teachers should be sensitive to the fact that students will be good at one thing but not necessarily another. Instead of pushing them to excel at everything, encourage them to focus on skills that they are good at, that they enjoy and that they find passion in. By the time children begin school they have already developed inclinations towards specific intelligences. From a very early age, children have established their dominant ways of learning. It is a teacher’s responsibility to be able to describe and examine students’ most developed intelligences so that more of their learning in school can take place through their preferred intelligences. The single
  4. 4. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 4 best way to assess students’ multiple intelligences is by simple observation. A good indicator of a students’ intelligence is observing what they do in their free time. What activities do students pick when they have choice time? Teachers should consider keeping a notebook or journal of observations for each student so that it can easily be referred back to. As far as an activity the teacher can do to find out specific intelligences, having students express their preferred intelligence through different types of media such as writing, drawing, personal or group discussions, etc. is helpful. Also, meetings with other teachers as well as parents allows for the teacher’s insight into the lives of these children outside the classroom and outside of school. The multiple intelligence theory has a different type of underlying structure than do many of the most current learning-style theories. “The MI theory is a cognitive model and seeks to describe how individuals use their intelligences to solve problems and fashion products” (p. 18). Gardner goes on to explain that unlike other models that are primarily process oriented, his approach is geared toward how the human mind operates on the contents of the world. This means focusing on encounters with people and objects. The MI theory suggests that it is not tied to the senses. “It is possible to be blind and have spatial intelligence or to be deaf and be quite musical”(p.34). This concept is valuable for teachers because students may struggle in one area but be proficient in another. It is imperative to not classify students based on their inabilities, rather to stimulate interests in other similar categories. Just because a student is not doing well in one aspect of a math problem, such as problem solving, does not mean that he will not do well in a
  5. 5. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 5 different aspect of math, such as fractions. In other words, the MI theory explores multiple facets of learning and their potentials. “The theory of multiple intelligences is a good model for looking at teaching strengths as well as for examining areas needing improvement” (p. 120). Teachers can identify these strengths and weaknesses by seeing what students are lacking in their work. For example, a student may avoid drawing pictures or including graphic materials in a presentation. This illustrates that the student is not fully developed in spatial intelligence. Because we know that all intelligences can be learned at least to a competent level, the teacher should then encourage the student to draw more or request that the student work closely with other’s who enjoy drawing. The ability to distinguish student’s strengths and weaknesses enables teachers to provide an individualized lesson that caters to the personal needs of that student. In addition, the theory aids students in working cooperatively as they can benefit from one another’s intelligences. The MI theory was not initially established by Gardner to be of value to educators. It was the educators who read the theory and found it effective for teaching. Teachers and administrators developed curriculum, assessments and other practices based on the MI theory. This holds true in many schools that have adopted the belief that all children learn through different means and hold vast capacities for learning. Teachers who take into consideration multiple intelligences and create lesson plans based on different learning styles create a learning experience that is suited for every child. By close encounters with students and observations, teachers can pick up on clues that expose children’s unique
  6. 6. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 6 intelligences. Having the ability to create a challenging and meaningful learning experience to all children is what we as educators strive for everyday. Teaching is not about presenting rote facts in hopes of passing on standardized tests. Teaching is about getting to know your students, being inspired by them and for creating a life-long learning within them. When children understand how to do something, they think it is fun. Our goal as educators is for children to find all activities that enhance learning as pleasant, enjoyable and instructional. References
  7. 7. Book Annotation- Multiple Intelligences and Teaching Kamila Bohacova Goddard College PSTP Packet 2 October, 2013 7 Gardner, H. (2006). Multiple Intelligences; new horizons (Completely rev. and updated. Ed.) New York: BasicBooks.

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