Usability Testing
Monday, November 15, 2010
If your audience finds your
document difficult to use, it
doesn’t mean that
they’ve failed.
Monday, November 15, 2010
It means that you failed them.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Creating usable
documents involves
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Designing with end-users in mind
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Companies are paying more and
more attention to their audiences.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Types of usability testing
Monday, November 15, 2010
•Focus Groups
•Contextual Inquiry
•Controlled Studies
•Follow-up Surveys
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
In a sense, you already did
this when you entered
the design phase of the
project.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Potential approaches to the task
Discuss...
Monday, November 15, 2010
Discuss...
Potential strengths of any given
approach or product
Monday, November 15, 2010
Discuss...
Potential problems of any possible
process / product
Monday, November 15, 2010
Discuss...
Goals for both process and
product
Monday, November 15, 2010
The purpose of a focus
group is to determine a
rough idea of what the
user’s needs are.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Once those needs have
been brought out, they
must be quantified in a
way that they can be
tested.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Now, on to the instructions...
Monday, November 15, 2010
Instructions should lead to a
completed task.
Monday, November 15, 2010
The task, from the user’s
perspective, should be
rewarding and satisfying.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Instructions are not satisfying if
people don’t understand them.
Monday, November 15, 2010
or
Monday, November 15, 2010
if they take too much
effort to follow.
Monday, November 15, 2010
It’s your job to make
sure things work and
are satisfying.
Monday, November 15, 2010
•Contextual Inquiry
•Controlled Observation
Monday, November 15, 2010
These documents are used
in varying contexts.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Monday, November 15, 2010
Ideally, testing is done in the context
the document will be used in.
Monday, November 15, 2010
(Obviously, that’s not possible in this class.)
Monday, November 15, 2010
• Most usability testing is done under
“lab” conditions where more factors
can be controlled and careful
observations can ...
The act of observing people
can’t help but affect the results.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Adopt a
participant / observer
stance.
Monday, November 15, 2010
The difference between strictly
observing a person navigating a
document or using a product
and participating in what they...
But it is also a matter of degree–
decide in advance just how much
you will interact with your test
subjects.
Monday, Nove...
• Develop a “protocol” which you will
follow for observing your test subjects
• Take careful notes, or make recordings,
so...
•Silent observation
•Talk-aloud protocol
•Entrance/exit interviewing
Monday, November 15, 2010
Testing can be done without interaction
with the participant.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Observe and take notes on every action.
Monday, November 15, 2010
•A “protocol” is merely a sort of
shorthand for recording those
observations– a code that is easier
for you to write down....
• You might write “T” when the subject stops
reading and does not perform any action to
signify that they were thinking
• ...
To use this method, start a table
with the elapsed time in one
column and the action which occurs
in the other.
Monday, No...
By carefully noting what the subject does at
each stage, you can locate the difficult parts.
Monday, November 15, 2010
To use the “talk aloud”
protocol, instruct your user to
say out-loud what they are
thinking as they attempt to
follow your...
(This is actually quite difficult.)
Monday, November 15, 2010
• You must take careful notes or record
the subjects comments to provide an
adequate report of the findings.
• You cannot r...
It’s possible to use both approaches
at the same time.
Monday, November 15, 2010
but
Monday, November 15, 2010
you’ve got to have a plan.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Make sure you standardize your
method of noting your observations,
especially if more than one group
member is recording r...
• It is often useful to have some background
knowledge about your test subjects.
• You can prepare a questionnaire with
qu...
Exit polls, such as satisfaction
surveys, can give you overall
feedback on your document/
product.
Monday, November 15, 20...
Solid test results balance the
needs of all the users involved
to achieve more uniform results
in real world circumstances...
Monday, November 15, 2010
Nobody produces a perfect product the first time.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Difficulties don’t mean that you suck.
Monday, November 15, 2010
Test results tell you how to target revisions.
Monday, November 15, 2010
This project is designed to
give you experience in
getting better results.
Monday, November 15, 2010
• Facilitate error recognition and recovery
• Try to make it easier for a user to spot when
they have gone wrong
• Give th...
Design with users in mind.
Monday, November 15, 2010
• Set design goals
• Test those goals and reevaluate them
• Redesign your document and adjust the goals
accordingly
• Test...
Your report should be
full of details.
Monday, November 15, 2010
•Details of your design goals
•Details of your testing procedure
including all iterations of the
product/design
Monday, No...
Remember that the testing
phase is a significant part of
your final report on the
instructions project.
Monday, November 15,...
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Usability Testing

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Introductory lecture on usability testing.

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Usability Testing

  1. 1. Usability Testing Monday, November 15, 2010
  2. 2. If your audience finds your document difficult to use, it doesn’t mean that they’ve failed. Monday, November 15, 2010
  3. 3. It means that you failed them. Monday, November 15, 2010
  4. 4. Creating usable documents involves Monday, November 15, 2010
  5. 5. Monday, November 15, 2010
  6. 6. Designing with end-users in mind Monday, November 15, 2010
  7. 7. Monday, November 15, 2010
  8. 8. Monday, November 15, 2010
  9. 9. Companies are paying more and more attention to their audiences. Monday, November 15, 2010
  10. 10. Types of usability testing Monday, November 15, 2010
  11. 11. •Focus Groups •Contextual Inquiry •Controlled Studies •Follow-up Surveys Monday, November 15, 2010
  12. 12. Monday, November 15, 2010
  13. 13. In a sense, you already did this when you entered the design phase of the project. Monday, November 15, 2010
  14. 14. Potential approaches to the task Discuss... Monday, November 15, 2010
  15. 15. Discuss... Potential strengths of any given approach or product Monday, November 15, 2010
  16. 16. Discuss... Potential problems of any possible process / product Monday, November 15, 2010
  17. 17. Discuss... Goals for both process and product Monday, November 15, 2010
  18. 18. The purpose of a focus group is to determine a rough idea of what the user’s needs are. Monday, November 15, 2010
  19. 19. Once those needs have been brought out, they must be quantified in a way that they can be tested. Monday, November 15, 2010
  20. 20. Now, on to the instructions... Monday, November 15, 2010
  21. 21. Instructions should lead to a completed task. Monday, November 15, 2010
  22. 22. The task, from the user’s perspective, should be rewarding and satisfying. Monday, November 15, 2010
  23. 23. Instructions are not satisfying if people don’t understand them. Monday, November 15, 2010
  24. 24. or Monday, November 15, 2010
  25. 25. if they take too much effort to follow. Monday, November 15, 2010
  26. 26. It’s your job to make sure things work and are satisfying. Monday, November 15, 2010
  27. 27. •Contextual Inquiry •Controlled Observation Monday, November 15, 2010
  28. 28. These documents are used in varying contexts. Monday, November 15, 2010
  29. 29. Monday, November 15, 2010
  30. 30. Monday, November 15, 2010
  31. 31. Monday, November 15, 2010
  32. 32. Monday, November 15, 2010
  33. 33. Ideally, testing is done in the context the document will be used in. Monday, November 15, 2010
  34. 34. (Obviously, that’s not possible in this class.) Monday, November 15, 2010
  35. 35. • Most usability testing is done under “lab” conditions where more factors can be controlled and careful observations can be made. • This is the type of observation you should do to improve your instructions. Monday, November 15, 2010
  36. 36. The act of observing people can’t help but affect the results. Monday, November 15, 2010
  37. 37. Adopt a participant / observer stance. Monday, November 15, 2010
  38. 38. The difference between strictly observing a person navigating a document or using a product and participating in what they do is significant. Monday, November 15, 2010
  39. 39. But it is also a matter of degree– decide in advance just how much you will interact with your test subjects. Monday, November 15, 2010
  40. 40. • Develop a “protocol” which you will follow for observing your test subjects • Take careful notes, or make recordings, so that you can collate and report those results. Monday, November 15, 2010
  41. 41. •Silent observation •Talk-aloud protocol •Entrance/exit interviewing Monday, November 15, 2010
  42. 42. Testing can be done without interaction with the participant. Monday, November 15, 2010
  43. 43. Observe and take notes on every action. Monday, November 15, 2010
  44. 44. •A “protocol” is merely a sort of shorthand for recording those observations– a code that is easier for you to write down. Monday, November 15, 2010
  45. 45. • You might write “T” when the subject stops reading and does not perform any action to signify that they were thinking • You might write “F” when the subject flips back and forth to locate something within your instructions • You might write “A” when the subject performs the assembly. Monday, November 15, 2010
  46. 46. To use this method, start a table with the elapsed time in one column and the action which occurs in the other. Monday, November 15, 2010
  47. 47. By carefully noting what the subject does at each stage, you can locate the difficult parts. Monday, November 15, 2010
  48. 48. To use the “talk aloud” protocol, instruct your user to say out-loud what they are thinking as they attempt to follow your instructions. Monday, November 15, 2010
  49. 49. (This is actually quite difficult.) Monday, November 15, 2010
  50. 50. • You must take careful notes or record the subjects comments to provide an adequate report of the findings. • You cannot rely on your memory to reconstruct this afterwards, especially since you will be working with multiple test-subjects. Monday, November 15, 2010
  51. 51. It’s possible to use both approaches at the same time. Monday, November 15, 2010
  52. 52. but Monday, November 15, 2010
  53. 53. you’ve got to have a plan. Monday, November 15, 2010
  54. 54. Make sure you standardize your method of noting your observations, especially if more than one group member is recording results. Monday, November 15, 2010
  55. 55. • It is often useful to have some background knowledge about your test subjects. • You can prepare a questionnaire with questions about their preferences such as visual, verbal, or hands-on learning styles. • This way you can better weight conflicting needs of different users. Monday, November 15, 2010
  56. 56. Exit polls, such as satisfaction surveys, can give you overall feedback on your document/ product. Monday, November 15, 2010
  57. 57. Solid test results balance the needs of all the users involved to achieve more uniform results in real world circumstances Monday, November 15, 2010
  58. 58. Monday, November 15, 2010
  59. 59. Nobody produces a perfect product the first time. Monday, November 15, 2010
  60. 60. Difficulties don’t mean that you suck. Monday, November 15, 2010
  61. 61. Test results tell you how to target revisions. Monday, November 15, 2010
  62. 62. This project is designed to give you experience in getting better results. Monday, November 15, 2010
  63. 63. • Facilitate error recognition and recovery • Try to make it easier for a user to spot when they have gone wrong • Give them the means to recover from such errors without feeling stupid Monday, November 15, 2010
  64. 64. Design with users in mind. Monday, November 15, 2010
  65. 65. • Set design goals • Test those goals and reevaluate them • Redesign your document and adjust the goals accordingly • Test again! Monday, November 15, 2010
  66. 66. Your report should be full of details. Monday, November 15, 2010
  67. 67. •Details of your design goals •Details of your testing procedure including all iterations of the product/design Monday, November 15, 2010
  68. 68. Remember that the testing phase is a significant part of your final report on the instructions project. Monday, November 15, 2010

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