Teaching Digital Composition with Blogs

3,141 views
3,018 views

Published on

A guest lecture on teaching digital composition with blogs that I delivered to Prof. Richard Beach's graduate seminar on Teaching Digital Writing.

Note: It originally included a student podcast on the "Podosphere Blues" slide; the mp3 is not included here.

9/25/07

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,141
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Teaching Digital Composition with Blogs

  1. 1. Teaching Digital Composition with Blogs Krista Kennedy Dept. of Writing Studies
  2. 2. Why teach with blogs?
  3. 3. How does all this improve student writing?
  4. 4. Why should you go to all this trouble?
  5. 5. The Lofty Pursuit of
  6. 6. Multimodal Literacy
  7. 7. Network Literacy
  8. 8. Network literacy is “writing in a distributed, collaborative environment. Weblogs are the first native web genre. Serial, unstable, networked...”
  9. 9. “Bringing network literacy to the classroom means jolting students out of the conventional individualistic, closed writing of essays only ever seen by their professor.” From Jill Walker's talk at Brown, http://huminf.uib.no/~jill/archives/blog_theorising talk_at_brown.html
  10. 10. The blog is your playground.
  11. 11. Web 2.0 is your erector set.
  12. 12. Both are tools to teach them to compose...
  13. 13. and share what they make.
  14. 14. • Sparklit • Flickr • Second Life • Meez (avatars) • Comic Life • Tabblo • YouTube • Odeo (podcasting)
  15. 15. The podosphere blues
  16. 16. Also...
  17. 17. college is about the public exchange of ideas.
  18. 18. Blogs are a space to write in public.
  19. 19. Public Writing = Public Responsibility
  20. 20. Public Writing = Real Participation in the Network
  21. 21. In order to accomplish all that...
  22. 22. You have to know exactly what you want.
  23. 23.  Class news?  Individual reflective journal?  Responses to assigned reading?  Building a learning community?  Filter for media coverage of course topics?  Building network literacy?  Engaging the larger blogosphere?  Portfolio for all writing done in the course?
  24. 24. How will goals drive your superstructure?
  25. 25. 1. How many blogs?
  26. 26.  Individual blog by instructor  Individual student blogs  Small group blogs  Class blog
  27. 27. Instructor Blog • Alternative Course Management System • Class announcements • Lecture notes • Syllabi, policies
  28. 28. (Take note: This can be an excellent CV peripheral for you.)
  29. 29. Problems
  30. 30. Preserves traditional classroom hierarchy
  31. 31. Monologic
  32. 32. Individual Blogs • Promotes ownership of work • Encourages reflection • Unconstrained by community norms • Demands some technological responsibility
  33. 33. Problems
  34. 34. Makes community more difficult
  35. 35. Demands a certain sort of personality
  36. 36. Requires more time for assessment
  37. 37. Small Group Blogs  Encourage collaborative reflection  Are conducive to peer review  Are a good communication tool for group projects
  38. 38. Problems
  39. 39. Usual collaboration issues
  40. 40. Overfamiliarity
  41. 41. Sometimes better served by a wiki
  42. 42. Often better served by a wiki
  43. 43. The Class Blog
  44. 44. Greater sense of community
  45. 45. Promotes ongoing discussion
  46. 46. Frequent post turnover
  47. 47. More conducive to comments
  48. 48. Easier assessment
  49. 49. Nearly automatic tech support
  50. 50. Problems
  51. 51. Individual voices can be subsumed
  52. 52. Lack of individual ownership
  53. 53. Universal Issue:
  54. 54. Forced Blogging
  55. 55. 1. Building community is never a waste of time.
  56. 56. 2. You must model the behavior you want to see.
  57. 57. 2a. You must be a functional part of the community.
  58. 58. 3. Provide clear motivation.
  59. 59. 4. Offer prompts.
  60. 60. 5. Offer incentives.
  61. 61. 5. Bring the blog into the classroom.
  62. 62. 6. Force options. Be dangerous.
  63. 63. Sirc, Geoff. English Composition as a Happening. Utah State UP, 2002.
  64. 64. Instructor responsibilities
  65. 65. People will find your blog.
  66. 66.  Search engines  Blog indexes  Uthink “Recently Updated Blogs” listing  Technorati  Blo.gs, weblogs.com  Referral logs  Links, trackbacks  Personal referrals IRL
  67. 67. FERPA compliance
  68. 68. Remind students of privacy issues
  69. 69. Use pseudonyms
  70. 70. Approve comments
  71. 71. Assessment
  72. 72. Provide specific criteria and rubrics in the syllabus.

×