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Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results
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Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results

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Nada K. Kakabadse, Professor in Management and Business Research at Northampton Business School, gave this presentation 'Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results' at the 10th International …

Nada K. Kakabadse, Professor in Management and Business Research at Northampton Business School, gave this presentation 'Women in the Boardroom: Why and Research Results' at the 10th International Conference on Corporate Governance at the World Council for Corporate Governance, Royal Overseas League, London on 10 October 2009

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  • Monday 26 October 2009 Group name goes here
  • Transcript

    • 1. Nada K. Kakabadse Professor in Management and Business Research Northampton Business School [email_address] http://www.kakabadse.com Women in the Boardroom : Why and Research Results 10th International Conference on Corporate Governance World Council for Corporate Governance, Royal Overseas League, London, 9-10 October 2009
    • 2. Why Women in the Boardroom? Page © N.K. Kakabadse <ul><li>Problems are so complex and difficult that boards need all the talent available to solve them </li></ul><ul><li>Absence of diversity (gender, ethnicity, age, skills, etc) from top strategic decision-making bodies, is among the most important problems that face boardrooms. </li></ul><ul><li>Having talented women in the boardroom in sufficient numbers, has potential to changes board dynamics for the better. </li></ul><ul><li>Do we have a sufficient talent pool? </li></ul>
    • 3. Facts and Research Page © N.K. Kakabadse <ul><li>Facts: </li></ul><ul><li>Financial sector has lowest proportions of female directors (5:1), followed by utility companies. </li></ul><ul><li>In hospitality 1/3 of directors are female; in education 40 per cent. </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Having </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One female director on the board appears to cut a company&apos;s chances of bankruptcy by about 20 per cent (in family-run businesses) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2-3 female directors lower the chances of bankruptcy even farther, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>50:50 gender split tapers off benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Study of the Fortune 500 (2006) found that companies with </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest proportion of women directors far outperformed those with the lowest proportion. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More women achieved higher sales and a higher return on their investments, and showed “good governance”. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Some evidence that women </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take on a bit less debt and are better at managing cash flow. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May be stronger at people-management: a lot of HR directors are women . </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. Our Research Page © N.K. Kakabadse <ul><li>Gender and behaviour research inconclusive – difference between man and woman exist, but performance varies within each board and strategic context (same person can behave differently in each situation). </li></ul><ul><li>Boardrooms need: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity of skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talented women and men </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attention to context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attention to competitive advantage/differentiation of organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interpretation of governance risk, reputation, and vulnerability according to context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity profile of skills/competencies linked to company purpose/strategy </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Need for Diversity Page © N.K. Kakabadse <ul><li>IJV with Indian companies: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Of 25 major IJVs established 1993-2003 in India only 3 survived in 2005 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 2009 no major IJV in India </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Significant mismatch in expectation between partners/falling out </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Since 2005 increasing number of Indian acquisitions outside India </li></ul><ul><ul><li>TCS (retail) and Tata Steel both have more than 50 per cent of non-Indian board directors (i.e. diversity). </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. Conclusion Page © N.K. Kakabadse <ul><li>More women on the boards: </li></ul><ul><li>Will not solve global problems at a stroke, BUT </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled experienced women will contribute to problem solution - by increasing the reservoirs of human ingenuity, imagination, insight – necessary for addressing problems. </li></ul><ul><li>How power/influence is exercised in the boardroom makes the difference - no difference between men and women. </li></ul><ul><li>Critical is to read context accurately! </li></ul>

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