4s4 electrolysis( Part 1)

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4s4 electrolysis( Part 1)

  1. 1. ELECTROCHEMISTRY<br /><ul><li> Electrolyte Vs Non-electrolyte
  2. 2. Conductor Vs electrolyte
  3. 3. Electrolysis
  4. 4. Electrolytic cell</li></ul>30/06/2010<br />
  5. 5. Learning outcomes<br />At the end of the lesson, you should able to:<br />state the meaning of electrolyte.<br />Differentiate between the conductor and electrolyte.<br />classify substances into electrolytes and non-electrolytes.<br />relate the presence of freely moving ions to electrical conductivity.<br />
  6. 6. Electrolyte in daily life<br />Why the athletes drink 100-plus drinks or other electrolyte drinks <br />after their vigorous training? <br />What is the function of electrolyte to the body?<br /> <br />Sweating is the way in which the body maintains its core temperature at 37°C. This results in the loss of body fluid and electrolytes (minerals such as chloride, calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium) and if unchecked will lead to dehydration and eventually circulatory collapse and heat stroke.<br />Electrolytes, especially sodium and potassium, in a drink will reduce urine output, enable the fluid to empty quickly from the stomach, promote absorption from the intestine and encourage fluid retention.<br />
  7. 7. Experiment<br />Previous<br />C. To Investigate the Electrical Conductivity of Compounds<br />Title:<br />To compare the properties of ionic and covalent compounds<br />Problem statement:<br />Do electrical conductivity of ionic compounds and covalent compounds differ in solid state and molten state?<br />
  8. 8. Carbon<br />electrodes<br />Molten NaCl conducts electricity<br />
  9. 9. NaCl solution<br />NaCl solution conducts electricity<br />
  10. 10. Electrical conductivity<br />MoltenNaCl, <br />NaClsolution<br />They can conduct electricity<br /> - due to <br /> the presence of free moving / mobile ions <br /> in the electrolytes<br /> are electrolytes<br />
  11. 11. -<br />-<br />+<br />Electrolytes can conduct electricity<br /><ul><li> due to the presence of</li></ul>free moving ions in the electrolytes<br />Eg.: NaCl solution<br />+<br />electrolyte<br />-<br />_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _<br />+<br />-<br />_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _<br />+<br />_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _<br />-<br />+<br />_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _<br />-<br />_ _ _ _ _<br />+<br />_ _ _ _ <br />
  12. 12. Electrolyte Vs Non-electrolyte<br />
  13. 13. Molten<br />Melted in high temperature.<br />A metal in its liquid state.<br />
  14. 14. Think……<br />Electricitycan passes through a Cu wire but there is NO chemical reaction taking place.<br />Do you classify Cu wire as an electrolyte?<br />Answer: No. Copper wire is not an electrolyte. It is a conductor. <br />Because copper wire is in solid state and it does not undergo chemical reaction.<br />
  15. 15. Conductor Vs Electrolyte<br />Conductor Electrolyte<br />
  16. 16. Electrolyte ? Non-electrolyte ?<br />Electrolyte<br />HClsolution<br />NH3solution<br />Glucose solution<br />Molten lead, Pb<br />AgClsolution<br />Tetrachloromethane, CCl4<br />Zinc wire<br />Copper penny<br />Non-electrolyte<br />Non-electrolyte<br />Non-electrolyte<br />Electrolyte<br />Non-electrolyte<br />Conductor<br />Conductor<br />
  17. 17. Explanation<br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Electrolysis<br />A process whereby a compound <br /> in molten or aqueous state<br /> are broken down into its constituent elements by passing electricity through an electrolyte.<br />
  20. 20. Electrolytic cell<br />Battery<br />Ammeter(A device used to measure current) / Light bulb<br />Wire<br />Switch<br />Electrodes (Carbon / metal)<br /> - a conductor in the form of wire, rod or plate which carries electric current in and out of the electrolyte during electrolysis.<br />Electrolyte<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22. Cations & Anions<br />Cations are pawsitive. <br />or<br />= positive<br />Cations are + ve. <br />AnionisaNegative ion<br />
  23. 23. C-<br />A+<br />
  24. 24. Cations Cathode<br />(+ve ions)<br />Anions Anode<br />(-ve ions)<br />
  25. 25. Form 5<br />“AnOX chases a Red CAT “<br />(Reduction-Cathode)<br />(Anode-Oxidation)<br />or<br />(both start with vowels)<br />(both start with consonants). <br />
  26. 26. Oxidation Vs Reduction: <br />Form 5<br />“ L E O goes G E R ”<br />(lose electron-oxidation, gain electron-reduction)<br />“O I L R I G ”<br />(Oxidation is Losing e-, Reduction is Gaining e- )<br />“ ELMO”<br />(Electron Loss Means Oxidation )<br />“LEO the lion. GER! “ or “ LEO says GER”<br />(Losing Electrons Oxidation, Gaining Electrons Reduction)<br />
  27. 27. Why can only conduct electricity in molten state? But not in solid state?<br />Molten Lead (II) bromide<br />Solid Lead (II) bromide<br />* Please watch the video clip that I have posted in FB...<br />
  28. 28. Popular Q<br />Why can only conduct electricity in molten state? But not in solid state?<br />Lead (II) bromide, PbBr2 is an ionic compound.<br />It consists of +ve Pb2+ ions and –ve Br- ions.<br />In solid PbBr2,<br /> these ions do not move freely <br /> but are held in fixed positions in lattice.<br />When PbBr2 melts (When in molten state), the ions are free to move. <br /> Hence, it can conduct electricity in molten state.<br />
  29. 29. Summary<br />Have you understood these?<br /><ul><li>Conductor
  30. 30. Electrolyte
  31. 31. Non-electrolyte
  32. 32. Electrolysis
  33. 33. Cations
  34. 34. Anions
  35. 35. Cathode
  36. 36. Anode</li>

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