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Community keynote

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Transcript

  • 1. COMMUNITY: THE FAQ
  • 2. ME C42 Engineering & TrustedRishta.com @ponnappa github.com/kaiwren
  • 3. ME Founding moderator: BRUG ! Founding organizer: RubyConf India ! Founding member: Devcamp India ! Member: Barcamp Bangalore, BangPypers, etc. ! ! !
  • 4. WHY TALK COMMUNITY?
  • 5. WHY TALK COMMUNITY? Good tech communities create immense value.
  • 6. Community is a decisive factor in the success of a technology. ! (or philosophy)
  • 7. An excellent example is the global Ruby community.
  • 8. This doesn’t happen “automatically.” This conference is an example.
  • 9. Creating a valuable community takes commitment.
  • 10. Creating a valuable community takes resources.
  • 11. Most importantly, it takes time. Years.
  • 12. UNDERSTANDING Understanding how valuable tech communities were built help us replicate those successes.
  • 13. CAVEAT: IMHO
  • 14. CREATING VALUE
  • 15. CREATING VALUE Why, how and for whom?
  • 16. WHY
  • 17. WHY Time. Effort. Money. Entertainment.
  • 18. Somewhere, a hacker creates something valuable.
  • 19. Somewhere, another hacker has the same problem. Even if it’s boredom.
  • 20. Somewhere, a customer is willing to pay for something valuable.
  • 21. This, and everyone in-between, is the community.
  • 22. COMMUNITY == ECOSYSTEM
  • 23. ECOSYSTEM MEMBERS Hackers.
  • 24. ECOSYSTEM MEMBERS Businesses.
  • 25. ECOSYSTEM MEMBERS Customers.
  • 26. HOW: MOVING VALUE
  • 27. Hackers Hackers Customers Businesses Fun, Learning, Contracts, Employment.
  • 28. Hackers Businesses Customers Businesses Recruiting, Tools, Products, Partnerships, Revenue.
  • 29. Hackers Customers Businesses Contractors, Tools, Products.
  • 30. EXCHANGING VALUE A valuable community facilitates bartering value.
  • 31. FACILITATING BARTERING
  • 32. BARTERING Bartering depends on trust. Trust depends on reputation.
  • 33. REPUTATION A valuable community facilitates tracking reputation of its members.
  • 34. DIGITAL REPUTATION
  • 35. PERSONAL REPUTATION What opinion do we have of each-other?
  • 36. These two contribute to the reputation of the community as a whole, attempting to answer the question: ! What is this community good at?
  • 37. FOR EXAMPLE Math Web apps Scientific computing
  • 38. BUILDING COMMUNITY
  • 39. GETTING STARTED
  • 40. STEP #1 Solve a stakeholder’s problem.
  • 41. For a new community, it’s easy: Focus on education.
  • 42. STEP #2 Dedicate time. Be systematic.
  • 43. Regular meetups. Active lists. ! Keeping to a regular schedule is critical.
  • 44. STEP #3 Identify and promote contributors.
  • 45. Remember, it’s about reputation and value. Hackers that educate. OSS contributors. Businesses that contribute money or meet up space. Customers that swear by your technology.
  • 46. TAKING OFF
  • 47. STEP #4 Identify the value chain. Who are the stakeholders? How do they benefit?
  • 48. STEP #5 Marketing. Stakeholders don’t always realise how much they can benefit from actively participating. ! Help them understand. Bring them into the fold.
  • 49. STEP #6 Facilitate bartering value. Help members of the ecosystem work together. Reputation and transitive trust is critical.
  • 50. STEP #7 Encourage face-to-face interaction. The internet is nice, but meeting people is great for trust.
  • 51. STEP #8 BE WILLING TO PASS ON THE BATON
  • 52. A NOTE ON PATIENCE
  • 53. Communities are never perfect.
  • 54. Ecosystems naturally seek…
  • 55. Systems in equilibrium change slowly.
  • 56. Therefore, communities change slowly.
  • 57. Most successful communities take years to build.
  • 58. A NOTE ON CULTURE
  • 59. The most visible examples are the ones that are followed.
  • 60. Rude people beget rude communities.
  • 61. Elitists beget elitist communities.
  • 62. Nice people beget nice communities.
  • 63. Personal favourite: MINSWAN Matz is nice, so we are nice.
  • 64. Nice people make the best value transfer facilitators, IMO.
  • 65. The larger the community, the more entrenched the culture.
  • 66. There is no superuser. Be flexible. Avoid ego-trips. xkcd.com/149
  • 67. Set the right example, early.
  • 68. A NOTE ON MARKETING
  • 69. “Build it and they will come” is a fallacy.
  • 70. Constantly strive to understand stakeholder problems. Maybe they don’t have learning resources. Maybe they can’t hire. Maybe they can’t find customers.
  • 71. Express how these problems can be solved. Clearly. Concisely. Rails’ scaffolding demo from 2005.
  • 72. IN CONCLUSION
  • 73. Communities exist for and because of stakeholders.
  • 74. Businesses and customers are a part of the community too.
  • 75. Communities facilitate the barter of value among stakeholders.
  • 76. Effective facilitation depends on creating trust.
  • 77. Trust depends on reputation.
  • 78. Building a reputation takes time. ! (and marketing)
  • 79. QUESTIONS @ponnappa github.com/kaiwren