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Assignment One …

Assignment One
Annotations of 10 articles and Critical reflection of ICT use.

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  • 1. Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Defining Multiliteracies. In M, Anstey & G, Bull(Eds.), Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing times, changingliteracies (pp. 19-55). vol: 10.This chapter explains what literacy itself is. It discusses the wayin which multiliteracies emerged throughout literacy programs inclassrooms. Cazden (1967) and Gee (1992) are examined as totheir involvement in the creation of multiliteracies. The centraltopic of the chapter is the influences of multiliterary practiceswithin the education environment and its benefits to allstudents. Luke and Freebody’s, Four resources model is alsoexamined within this particular chapter to discuss its use in themultiliteracies pedagogy. It is also learnt that to be multiliterate,you must recognize certain qualities and be able to use differentand new practices in literacy. WORDLE
  • 2. Henderson, R. (2004). Recognising difference: One of the challenges of using amultiliteracies approach? Practically Primary, 9 (2), 11-14 Retrieved from A-Education database.This article discussed the New London Group and how appropriate andimportant it is that the learning processes engage with the backgroundand socio ergonomic changes with students rather than disregard orremove of them. The article focused on the significance of teachersbeing aware of student differences and strengths, making themobservable in the literacy learning. Robyn refers to a lens analogy tobreak down a teacher’s vision of a child, as it is made apparent thatshe believes teachers decide their own view of learning that takesplace, rather than accommodating for the difference which is oftenover looked and complex to recognise. The article talks about theMultiliteracies approach and how simply it can be integrated into theLens analogy, allowing teachers to observe literacy learning as itsextensive socio cultural learning context. WORDLE
  • 3. The New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. HarvardEducational Review, 66 (1), 60-92. Retrieved fromhttp://wwwstatic.kern.org/filer/blogWrite44ManilaWebsite/paul/articles/A_Pedagogy_of_Multiliteracies_Designing_Social_Futures.htmIt is evident that Multiliteracy is the major focus of this article just byreading the title. The article provides a theoretical overview of theconnections between social environments altering and the need for adifferent approach to literacy. The authors discuss the boundaries oftraditional literacy and how those are conquered with multiliteracies.Multiliteracy is believed to be achieving two goals; students’ access toevolving language and critical engagement. It is evident that the articleis attempting to expand the readers understanding of literacy, teachingand learning. The authors argue that literacy pedagogy must includethe ever increasing assortment of text this includes technology. Thisarticle goes into great detail of the four components of pedagogysuggested by the authors of situated practice, overt instruction, criticalframing and transformed practice, though is lengthy and in placecomplex to gain greater understanding. WORDLE
  • 4. Waller, M. (2009) ‘Multiliteracies and meaningful learning contexts in the primaryclassroom’ Proceedings of the 45th United Kingdom Association Internationalconference – Making connections Building Literate Communities in and beyond theclassrooms, 10th – 12th July 2009, London: University of Greenwich.It is evident that the main focus of this article is multiliteraciespedagogies as they are discussed and defined as being a positivedistinct learning experience that fulfils learning without the useof a generalised learning approach. The article reflects on a yearlong journey that was undertaken to launch multiliteracies intothe curriculum, by collaborating with multiple modes ofcommunication methods. The journey was completed byestablishing a multiliteracies learning pedagogy whichincorporated a critical literacy approach, resulting in an overallsuccessful focus on literacy as a critical practice in the classroom. WORDLE
  • 5. Goodin, S. (2006). Multiliteracies and the school library [Electronic Version]. CSLAJournal, 30 (1), 23-25.The key focus of this article is on multiliteracies and the part it playsamongst student learning. The author discusses the role of the libraryand how libraries accommodate multi-modal literacies. The schoollibrary has the ability to provide for old and new literacies this includesnew technologies which are aligned with multiliteracies. The articledescribes the New London Groups pedagogy of multiliteracies andadvocates schools embracing a variety of texts and diverse textualforms. The author of this article enlightens a broader view of literacythat allows for a more inclusive vision of what literate text andpractices are. The reader is made accustomed to the abundance ofcommunication modes which includes visual, aural, linguistic anddiverse semiotic modes all available to supply the individuals’information needs. WORDLE
  • 6. Educational Opportunities and Challenges - Multiliteracies: Exploring new learning .Multiliteracies: Exploring new learning - Home. Retrieved March 13, 2012, fromhttp://www.multiliteracies101.weebly.com/educational-opportunities-and- challenges.htmlIt is evident that this article pin points the change of globalisation andhow important it is for citizens to become accustomed tomultiliteracies changes in today’s society in order to accomplish. Thearticle recognises that Multiliteracies will not however replacetraditional literacy, but simply adopt as its importance is so high. Thearticle discusses the significance multiliteracies has on teachingmulticulturalism in the classroom, focusing on The New London Groupas its multiliteracies pedagogy provides opportunities for students tounderstand global cultures within a classroom environment. Threecommon forms of literacy’s were discussed; recognition, reproductionand reflection literacy focusing generally on critical literacy and itschallenges connected with multiliteracies. WORDLE
  • 7. Stein, P., & Newfield, D. (n.d). Multiliteracies and multimodality in English in educationin Africa: mapping the terrain. English studies in Africa 49 (1). 1-18. Johannesburg:University of the Witwatersrand.This article is concerned with the significance of a multiliteraciespedagogy in our schools particularly within the English classroom. Itdiscusses the surfacing of new relationships between ways ofrepresentation and communication which have caused a change inteaching and learning styles. Although the text positively strengthensthe need for this learning. What makes this text considerable is that issympathises with teachers who struggle to acclimatize to this new wayof teaching as major pressure and complexity can be met by teachersin developing inventive opportunities for students that use a feasiblemetalanguage for teaching and assessing multimodal texts. Regardlessof being an African Journal, very little mention is made to thechallenges faced with readily accessing and using digital literacies inthe majority of African schools. Its main focus is on encouragingteachers, who in working purposefully with students’ creativity cangenerate an pleasant educational experience with the use of multi-modes of literacy to appoint within the English curriculum. WORDLE
  • 8. Mills, K. (2009), Multiliteracies: interrogating competing discourses [Electronic version] Language and Education (Vol. 23, No. 2) 103-116 Retrieved 02 March, 2012.This article is paying particular attention to the alteration of Literaciespedagogy to embrace the changes in communication needs of ourculturally diverse societies and global trends. The argument amongnew literacies such as popular culture and multimedia as opposedclassic, time honoured literature were highlighted. The author givesthe examples of multi-modal texts that children will come across andrequire the knowledge about in order to function as a part of society.Discussions on the new approaches to pedagogy and multiliteracies bythe New London Group give substance to the findings of the studies onthe application of the multiliteracies pedagogy with students fromdiverse ethnic backgrounds. WORDLE
  • 9. Beyond technology for technology’s sake: Advancing multiliteracies in the twenty-firstcentury. By C. Borsheim, K. Merritt & D. ReedThis article argues the significance of a pedagogical change awayfrom the traditional teaching to embrace multiliteracies learningfor the twenty-first century students. It is argued thattechnology should not be taught just for technology sake butrather as transformative literacy. Digital natives need to beoccupied in literacy learning through several modes ofcommunication including web 2.0 applications and additionaldigital technologies. This article is based on Beers work movingfrom traditional literacy learning to multiliteracies. WORDLE
  • 10. Fellows, J., & Oakley, G. (2010). Visual and Critical Literacy. In Fellows, J., & Oakley, G.(eds.), Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education (pp. 488-508) SouthMelbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.The main discussion of this chapter is the utilisation of visual andcritical literacies within the multiliteracies pedagogy. The authorspropose that this approach, which involves analysing and questioning,should be used throughout all educational settings this includes theearly years. Importance of visual and critical literacy is discussed inregards to the multimodality needed by students to consult existingmodes of literacy. Deconstruction, reconstruction and juxtaposition arethree extensive approaches that are explained in detail. Fellows andOakley present activities and suggestions that would be useful forearly childhood educators who are teaching critical literacies. WORDLE
  • 11. Critical Reflection on ICT’s“ICT are at the core of learning and teaching in the 21st century. Queensland’s future depends on how successfully we integrate ICT in the curriculum and daily learning and teaching.’ (State of Queensland, 2002)I believe that a deep knowledge of ICT’s is extremely essential for educators to be familiar with. This is why for the purpose of this assignment my aim was to familiarize myself with and extend my technological repertoire, whilst also engaging with social networking sites which children are familiar with. I did this via the use of a two different websites the first being facebook which is extremely familiar to me and provided me the opportunity to use this site in an educational manner, the next is the slideshare presentation, which I found quite complex. The easy part was creating the PowerPoint presentation, the more complicated part was the editing and hyperlinking the Wordle.As a future educator I will strive to employ a variety of pedagogical and Multiliteracy frameworks by implementing various forms of ICTs. My future goal is to develop an extensive knowledge of multiliteracies and will continue to grow throughout the process of implementing age appropriate uses for ICTs.When trying to locate articles I found it quite easy to identify the ones that I wanted to use for the purpose of this assessment. To do this I accessed reputable textbooks from the local library, access to the University journal database and online journals’. Reading these article was extremely interesting and assisted to broaden my knowledge of Multiliteracies.
  • 12. Critical Reflection on ICT’sOverall, I am extremely happy with what I have achieved with the technological part of this assessment, I implemented the ICT component via accessing prior knowledge which transformed the knowledge into another design element; Prezi.I believe this assignment has highlighted my understanding of the four components of pedagogy, my ability to think critically demonstrated transformed practice, overt instruction, situated practice and critical framing.
  • 13. References.• Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Defining Multiliteracies. In M, Anstey & G, Bull (Eds.), Teaching and Learning Multiliteracies: Changing times, changing literacies (pp. 19-55). vol: 10.• Beyond technology for technology’s sake: Advancing multiliteracies in the twenty-first century. By C. Borsheim, K. Merritt & D. Reed• Educational Opportunities and Challenges - Multiliteracies: Exploring new learning . (n.d.). Multiliteracies: Exploring new learning - Home. Retrieved March 13, 2012, from http://www.multiliteracies101.weebly.com/educational-opportunities-and-challenges.html• Fellows, J., & Oakley, G. (2010). Visual and Critical Literacy. In Fellows, J., & Oakley, G. (eds.), Language, Literacy and Early Childhood Education (pp. 488-508) South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.• Goodin, S. (2006). Multiliteracies and the school library [Electronic Version]. CSLA Journal, 30 (1), 23-25.• Henderson, R. (2004). Recognising difference: One of the challenges of using a multiliteracies approach? Practically Primary, 9 (2), 11-14 Retrieved from A-Education database.• Jan, L. (2009). Literacy and Language. Write ways: modelling writing forms (3rd ed., pp. 1-16). South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press• Luke, A. & Freebody, P. 1999, ‘A map of possible practices: further notes on the Four Resources Model’, Practically Primary, June, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 5-8.• McDaniel, C. (2004). Critical literacy: A questioning stance and the possibility for change. The reading teacher, 57, 472-481.• Mills, K. (2009), Multiliteracies: interrogating competing discourses [Electronic version] Language and Education (Vol. 23, No. 2) 103- 116 Retrieved 02 March, 2012.• State of Queensland 2002, Information and communication technologies for learning: school information kit (2002-2003), Queensland Government, Brisbane.• Stein, P., & Newfield, D. (n.d). Multiliteracies and multimodality in English in education in Africa: mapping the terrain. English studies in Africa 49 (1). 1-18. Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand.• The New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1), 60-92. Retrieved from EJS database.• Waller, M. (2009) ‘Multiliteracies and meaningful learning contexts in the primary classroom’ Proceedings of the 45 th United Kingdom Association International conference – Making connections Building Literate Communities in and beyond the classrooms, 10th – 12th July 2009, London: University of Greenwich.• Wink, J. (2000). Critical pedagogy: Notes from the real world (2nd ed.). New York: Longman.