Baltic report graphs_8_v_crxhn_yeryee_bal_s13_demo_eng

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The Baltic Salary Report, Demo version, August 2013, The Salary Information Agency

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Baltic report graphs_8_v_crxhn_yeryee_bal_s13_demo_eng

  1. 1. The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States (Demo-version) Spring 2013 1
  2. 2. The Salary Information Agency specialises in: • Salaries offered by employers by occupation • Employees’ salary expectations by occupation • Reward and benefit packages by job group • Comparison of remuneration systems • Salary adjustments and forecasts, and their causes • Application of smart work arrangements The Salary Information Agency organises: • Employers’ and Employees’ Salary Surveys • Interpretation and analysis of salary statistics • Round tables, seminars and conferences • Advice to employers and employees on matters of salary and work organisation • Publications: salary survey reports, compilations of articles Unique Evolving and engaging Representative Reliable Quick and immediate Sound methods Participant-friendly Smart investment The Agency's mission is to generate useful information for employers to help them create competitive remuneration packages and for employees to develop adequate salary expectations. Activities of the Agency 2
  3. 3. Publications available from the Salary Information Agency Report name Description Date of publication Price (EUR without VAT) Price for participants (EUR witout VAT) The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States contains the conclusions of employers’ and employees’ salary surveys from all three countries. 1.08.2013 790 590 Employers’ and Employees’ Salary Survey Country Report (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania separately) The report contains comparative conclusions of Employers’ Salary Survey and Employees' and Job Seekers Salary Survey for each country: basic salary adjustments and employers’ forecasts for adjustments, reasons behind adjustments, employees’ gross salary adjustments, changes in labour demand and how organisations react to these changes, work organisation and working conditions in organisations, employers’ and employees’ views on work organisation and working conditions, forms of employee representation and employees’ participation in these representations, salaries in April 2013 (statistical average, median, 1st and 3rd quartiles, 10th and 90th percentiles), including salary components and employees’ salary expectations, in 30 job sectors. 1.07.2013 390 195 The Employers’ Salary Survey Report The report contains the conclusions of the Employers' Salary Survey in each country: basic salary adjustments, forecasts and reasons for adjustments, changes in labour demand and how organisations react to these changes, work organisation and working conditions in organisations, forms of employee representation, salaries in April (statistical average, median, 1st and 3rd quartiles, 10th and 90th percentiles), including salary components, in 30 job sectors. 1.07.2013 250 150/0* Participant Report for Employer Similarly to the Employers’ Salary Survey Report this report contains summaries of basic salary adjustments, work organisation and other related topics, as well as average salaries (statistical average, median, 1st and 3rd quartile, 10th and 90th percentile) by occupation in April 2013 in those sectors that the particular participant submitted salary data about. If the participant submitted data for more than two job sectors, the Employers’ Salary Survey Report will be free of charge for them. 1.07.2013 not available 0 Sector report on employers’ and employees’ salary survey outcomes The report contains a short summary of the main conclusions of the salary surveys, and April 2013 salaries in one sector (eg manufacturing, transport, trade etc.) of the relevant country, incl. salary components and employees’ salary expectations. 1.07.2013 150 75 3
  4. 4. PROFILE OF SURVEY RESPONDENTS The Employers’ Salary Survey 4
  5. 5. Number of respondents 283 243 179 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Estonia Latvia Lithuania Employers 9227 7488 3163 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 10000 Estonia Latvia Lithuania Employees 5
  6. 6. Need for relevant salary information 23% 45% 26% 4% 3% 25% 46% 23% 4% 2% 21% 41% 32% 6% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Very rarely – once a year Rarely – once a quarter Regularly – once a month Often - once a week Very often – daily Need for salary information Estonia Latvia Lithuania 0% 50% 100% 150% Official statistics Fontes’ salary survey Hay Group’s salary survey Mercer’s salary survey Other Sources used for salary market information Estonia Latvia Lithuania See the full version of The Salary Survey report on The Baltic States 6
  7. 7. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Agriculture, forestry and fishing Mining and quarrying Manufacturing Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning… Water collection, treatment and supply Construction Wholesale and retail trade Transportation and storage Accommodation and food service activities Information and communication Financial and insurance activities Real estate activities Professional, scientific and technical activities Administrative and support service activities Public administration and defence,… Education Human health and social work activities Arts, entertainment and recreation Other service activities Other Estonia Latvia Lithuania Responding organisations by economic activity 7
  8. 8. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 1-9 employees 10-19 employees 20-49 employees 50-99 employees 100-249 employees 250-499 employees more than 500 employees Estonia Latvia Lithuania Responding organisations by employee range 8
  9. 9. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Harju county ... Tallinn Hiiu county Ida-Viru county Jõgeva county Järva county Lääne county Lääne-Viru county Põlva county Pärnu county Rapla county Saare county Tartu county Valga county Viljandi county Võru county Spring 2013 Autumn 2012 Spring 2012 42% 36% 26% 14% 85% 0%20%40%60%80%100% Only Tallinn and/or Harju county Harju county, Tallinn and abroad Outside Tallinn and Harju county Estonia and abroad Only Estonia Spring 2013 Autumn 2012 Spring 2012 Respondents’ region of activity – Estonia 9
  10. 10. 86% 42% 39% 37% 32% 34% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Riga region Greater Riga area Vidzeme region Kurzeme region Zemgale Latgale region Respondents’ region of activity - Latvia 10
  11. 11. 30% 41% 49% 47% 29% 33% 36% 25% 25% 27% 42% 73% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Alytus county Kaunas county Kaunas Klaipeda county Marijampoles county Panevezys county Šiauliai county Tauragės county Tent county Utena county Vilnius county Vilnius Respondents’ region of activity - Lithuania 11
  12. 12. PROFILE OF SURVEY RESPONDENTS The Employees‘ Salary Survey 12
  13. 13. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Sales and marketing Finance and accounting Information and telecommunication… Industry and manufacturing Transportation, storage and logistics Clerical and administrative work Construction and real estate Banking and insurance State and public administration Education and training Energy, electricity and electronics Health care and medicine Accommodation and food service Human resources and employment Management and business services Law Advertising and PR Humanities and the creative sector Protective and emergency services Social work and welfare Agriculture, forestry and fishing Personal services Earth and engineering sciences Cleaning works Information workers Representative organisations and other… Sports, culture and leisure Environmental protection and waste… Mining Estonia Latvia Lithuania Area of work 13
  14. 14. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% Sales and marketing Clerical and administrative work Finance and accounting Industry and manufacturing Information and telecommunication… Management and business services Transportation, storage and logistics State and public administration Construction and real estate Banking and insurance Human resources and employment Education and training Advertising and PR Accommodation and food service Humanities and the creative sector Energy, electricity and electronics Sports, culture and leisure Law Health care and medicine Social work and welfare Personal services Information workers Agriculture, forestry and fishing Earth and engineering sciences Cleaning works Environmental protection and waste… Protective and emergency services Representative organisations and other… Mining Estonia Latvia Lithuania See the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States Desired area of work 14
  15. 15. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Top managers Professionals Technicians and associate professionals Supervisors Excecutive directors and project managers Clerical support workers Service and sales workers Craft and related trades workers Plant and machine operators Assemblers Drivers and mobile plant operators Elementary occupations Estonia Latvia Lithuania Occupation group 15
  16. 16. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Entrepreneur Full-time salaried employee Part-time salaried employee Apprentice Voluntary worker Studying at school or university Conscript Pensioner On pregnancy or maternity leave On parental leave Registered unemployed Do not work or study Labour status Estonia Latvia Lithuania 0% 10% 20% 1-9 employees 10-19 employees 20-49 employees 50-99 employees 100-249 employees 250-499 employees more than 500 employees Range of employees – current employer Estonia Latvia Lithuania Labour status and size of company 16
  17. 17. 19% 43% 0% 5% 1% 1% 1% 3% 1% 5% 2% 1% 12% 1% 2% 1% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Harju county ... Tallinn Hiiu county Ida-Viru county Jõgeva county Järva county Lääne county Lääne-Viru county Põlva county Pärnu county Rapla county Saare county Tartu county Valga county Viljandi county Võru county Estonia Place of residence 59% 10% 10% 9% 9% 4% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Riga region Greater Riga area Vidzeme region Kurzeme region Zemgale Latgale region Latvia 2% 8% 16% 8% 2% 4% 5% 0% 2% 1% 6% 48% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Alytus county Kaunas county Kaunas city Klaipeda county Marijampoles county Panevezys county Šiauliai county Tauragės county Tent county Utena county Vilnius county The city of Vilnius Lithuania 17
  18. 18. 0% 19% 18% 18% 13% 15% 12% 2% 3% 1% 30% 27% 16% 8% 9% 8% 1% 1% 1% 37% 43% 8% 4% 4% 2% 1% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Doctoral degree Master’s degree Bachelor’s degree Vocational higher education Post-secondary vocational education General secondary education Vocational secondary education Vocational education after basic education Basic education Less than basic education Education of respondents Estonia Latvia Lithuania Education 18
  19. 19. 61% 39% 62% 38% 59% 42% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Female Male Gender of respondents Estonia Latvia Lithuania Gender 19
  20. 20. 0% 11% 38% 25% 18% 8% 1% 0%0% 9% 41% 25% 18% 7% 0% 0%0% 12% 53% 21% 12% 3% 0% 0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 15 or younger 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 or older Age of respondents Estonia Latvia Lithuania Age 20
  21. 21. CHANGES IN BASIC SALARIES The Employers’ Salary Survey 21
  22. 22. The Employers’ Salary Survey - changes in basic salaries Slides 34-52 of the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States: • Share of respondents who had not changed, had changed or were planning to change basic salaries • Share of respondents who raised basic salary during Nov.2013-Apr.2013 or were planning to raise basic salary in May2013-Oct.2013 - by economy sector • Share of respondents who raised basic salary during Nov.2013-Apr.2013 or were planning to raise basic salary in May2013-Oct.2013 - by number of employees • Share of respondents who raised basic salary during Nov 2012 – Apr 2013, by occupation group • Average basic salary increase during Nov 2012 – Apr 2013, by occupation group • Share of respondents who were planning to raise basic salary in May – Oct 2013, by occupation group • Average planned basic salary increase in May – Oct 2013, by occupation group • Share of employees whose basic salary was raised during Nov 2012 – Apr 2013, by occupation group • Share of employees whose basic salary rise is planned for May – Oct 2013 • Reasons behind adjustments in Nov.2013-Apr.2013 • Reasons behind adjustments in May2013-Oct.2013 22
  23. 23. NET SALARY CHANGES The Employees‘ Salary Survey 23
  24. 24. Net salary changes Slides 34-52 of the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States: • Changes in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of respondents (%) • Changes in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of respondents by area of work • Average rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013 (%) • Net salary changes Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by occupation group of respondents • Net salary changes Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by size of employing organisation • Average rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, by size of employing organisation • Net salary changes Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by gender • Average rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, by gender of respondents • Changes in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by age group of respondents • Avarage rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, Changes in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by education level of respondents by age group of respondents • Avarage rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, by education level of respondents • Changes in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013, share of responses by years in service • Average rise in net salary Apr 2012 – Apr 2013,by years in service 24
  25. 25. LABOUR MARKET 25
  26. 26. Labour market indicators 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 Employment rate % Estonia Latvia Lithuania Finland Sweden Norway Source: Eurostat 0 5 10 15 20 25 Unemployment rate % Estonia Latvia Lithuania Finland Sweden Norway Source: Eurostat 26
  27. 27. Labour market indicators 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Minimum wage, EUR Estonia Latvia Lithuania Source: Eurostat 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 2008 2009 2010 2011 Labour costs, EUR Estonia Latvia Lithuania Source: Eurostat 27
  28. 28. JOB SEEKING The Employees‘ Salary Survey 28
  29. 29. Job seeking Slides 57-62 of the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States: • Job seeking – all respondents • Job seeking – share of respondents who were full-time salaried employees • Job seeking activities by area of work – TOP 10 • Job seeking activities by years in service • Job seeking activities by size of employing organisation • Job seeking activities by age group • Job seeking activities by level of education 29
  30. 30. CHANGES IN LABOUR DEMAND & ASSESSMENT OF LABOUR MARKET SITUATION The Employers’ Salary Survey 30
  31. 31. CHANGES IN LABOUR DEMAND & Assessment of labour market situation Slides 64-73 of the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States: • Employers’ forecast for labour demand • Increased demand, number of employees required in 2013 • Increased demand, number of employees required in 2013–2015 • Assessment of labour market situation by organisation’s area of activity • Assessment of labour market situation by size of organisation • Dealing with labour shortage 31
  32. 32. WORK ORGANISATION 32
  33. 33. Work organisation Slides 75-85 of the full version of The Salary Survey Report on the Baltic States: • Work organisation – employees’ views: Autonomy in work organisation • Work organisation – employers’ views: Employees’ autonomy in work organisation • Work organisation – employees’ responses: Teleworking possibilities • Work organisation – employees’ responses: Teleworking possibilities and satisfaction with work organisation • Work organisation – employers’ responses: Teleworking possibilities in organisation • Work organisation – employees’ views: Working conditions and environment • Work organisation – employees’ views: Working conditions and environment • Work organisation – employers’ views: Working conditions and environment 33
  34. 34. 36% 31% 29% 43% 36% 34% 38% 38% 35% 51% 42% 43% 39% 43% 34% 30% 27% 38% 36% 32% 40% 31% 23% 32% 29% 24% 37% 17% 30% 46% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% If the nature of the work does not require fixed hours in the office then it is pointless to enforce it. LV LT Managers should spend more time on assessing performance rather than enforcing fixed working hours. LV LT Organisations that offer flexible working, including teleworking, are more attractive as employers. LV LT Employees are better motivated and more efficient when they have more say in their work organisation. LV LT In order for flexible working to be successful it would have to be a natural part of the organisation's work culture and not just an… LV LT Pros of flexible work organisation 4- agree 5- strongly agree Work organisation – employees’ views 34
  35. 35. 38% 36% 43% 35% 30% 33% 20% 25% 30% 51% 37% 40% 17% 21% 25% 15% 16% 21% 5% 6% 12% 29% 22% 25% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Many employees lack sufficient self-discipline and sense of responsibility to work independently. LV LT Teleworking at home presents various risks for the employee – responsibility for their work equipment and covering the costs… LV LT Allowing teleworking damages team work and causes tension due to unfairness. LV LT Flexible working makes it more difficult to keep work and private life apart. LV LT Cons of flexible work organisation 4- agree 5- strongly agree Work organisation – employees’ views 35
  36. 36. 32% 35% 35% 41% 38% 41% 43% 30% 36% 47% 42% 48% 38% 48% 27% 57% 47% 57% 19% 15% 20% 21% 8% 23% 25% 18% 27% 43% 33% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% With non-manual employees it is more important to assess their performance rather than enforce fixed working hours. EE LV LT Giving employees more autonomy allows managers more time to deal with organisational matters instead of checking adherence to fixed… LV LT Offering flexible working, including teleworking, improves the employer’s reputation, which in turn helps to recruit better… LV LT Giving employees more freedom and responsibility to organise their own work improves their motivation and performance. EE LV LT In order for flexible work organisation to be successful it would have to be a natural part of the organisation's work culture and not just an… LV LT Pros of flexible work organisation 4- agree 5- strongly agree Work organisation – employers’ views 36
  37. 37. 24% 23% 34% 21% 28% 37% 16% 32% 37% 26% 37% 41% 4% 4% 9% 8% 10% 11% 7% 8% 12% 10% 13% 23% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% The majority of employees cannot be trusted with managing their own work organisation as they lack sufficient self-discipline and sense of… LV LT Allowing teleworking presents various risks for the employer, such as security risk, health and safety risk and loss of assets risk. EE LV LT Allowing teleworking damages team work and causes tension due to a sense of unfairness. EE LV LT Allowing flexible work organisation makes people and work process management significantly more complex. EE LV LT Cons of flexible work organisation 4- agree 5- strongly agree Work organisation – employers’ views 37

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