Why So Few Women in STEM

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AAUW’s latest report: Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.

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  • First, the implicit.harvard test on slide 16...VERY FUN!!!

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    Just yesterday I checked out Alexis for the top internet sites. Next I checked who the founder/ CEO’s of these sites were. I was disappointed because they were all men.
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  • Supporting women and girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics has been a part of AAUW’s mission since its founding in 1881. Throughout its history, AAUW has encouraged women to study and work in these traditionally male fields, investing millions of dollars in graduate fellowships and grants and engaging in research, programming and advocacy to break through the barriers for women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.   Today, I am pleased to share with you AAUW’s latest report Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. On the cover of the report is a picture of a former AAUW fellow, Esther Ngumbi.
  • AAUW thanks the National Science Foundation for a grant to conduct this study. We also thank the Letitia Corum Memorial Fund and the Mooneen Lecce Giving Circle for generous contributions to this project. The Eleanor Roosevelt Fund which supports all of AAUW research activity is also an important funder. Together, these contributors made the research and production of this report possible.
  • Women have made tremendous progress in education and the workplace during the past 50 years, including in scientific and engineering fields. However, women are underrepresented in many science and engineering occupations. This chart shows the percentage of women in selected STEM professions, and although women make up more than half of working biological scientists, they make up less than 7% of mechanical engineers.
  • Based on interviews with top researchers and a review of the large body of academic research literature on gender and science, Why So Few? presents 8 separate research findings on the nurture side of the nature-nurture debate. Each of these findings demonstrates that social and environmental factors clearly contribute to the underrepresentation of women in science and engineering. The research findings are organized into three areas: How social and environmental factors shape girls’ achievements and interest in math and science; How the climate of university science and engineering departments affect women’s –both students and faculty - experience in STEM fields; and The continuing role of bias in limiting women’s success in STEM in education and the workplace. [OPTIONAL] We all know that there are biological differences between men and women, but as yet, there is no clear link between any of these differences and the underrepresentation of women in science and engineering. In contrast, we have a lot of evidence that culture can make a difference. For example, an ongoing study of mathematically precocious youth finds that thirty years ago there were 13 boys for every girl who scored above 700 on the SAT math exam at age 13; today that ratio has shrunk to about 3:1. So that’s a shift from 13:1 boys to girls to 3:1 boys to girls in just 30 years. This rapid rise in the number of girls identified as “mathematically gifted” suggests that culture, specifically how we cultivate math and science achievement in girls, makes a difference in girls’ achievement in these areas.
  • I will first describe the findings presented in the report that show how girls’ achievements and interest in math and science are shaped by social and environmental factors.
  • The first finding is research by Dr. Joshua Aronson, a psychologist at New York University that shows that negative stereotypes about girls’ and women’s abilities in math and science persist and can adversely affect their performance in these fields through a phenomenon known as stereotype threat. Stereotype threat arises in situations where a person fears that their performance will be evaluated based on a negative stereotype. For example, a female student taking a difficult math test might experience an extra cognitive and emotional burden of worry that if she performs poorly her performance will reinforce and confirm the stereotype that women are not good at math. This added burden of worry can adversely affect her performance. [Explain chart.] [Explanation of chart: In one experiment, researchers gave a math test to female and male college students with similar math abilities . Half the group was told that men generally perform better than women on the test (the “stereotype threat” condition) and the other half was told that there were no gender differences (the “no stereotype threat” condition). The results are shown in this figure. Women performed significantly worse than men in the “threat” situation, but women and men performed equally well in the non- threat condition. ]   If gender differences in performance were due to innate gender differences in math, then women would perform worse than men even in the no stereotype threat condition. This result has been shown hundreds of times in other experiments, not just with gender but with race and ethnicity as well. Fortunately, because stereotype threat is linked to the learning environment there are some simple ways to lessen its negative impact by changing the environment. These include: Recommendations Exposing girls to successful role models in math and science to combat the negative stereotype, and Explicitly talking to students about stereotype threat has resulted in improved performance.
  • The next finding addresses beliefs about intelligence. Believing in the potential for intellectual growth, in and of itself, improves outcomes. The research of Carol Dweck, a psychologist at Stanford University, provides evidence that a “growth mindset” as opposed to a “fixed mindset” is likely to lead to greater persistence in the face of adversity and ultimately success in any realm. The table shown here lays out the differences between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset. Individuals with a fixed mindset believe that intelligence is static and inborn. In contrast, individuals with a growth mindset believe that intelligence can be developed through effort. Individuals with a fixed mindset are susceptible to a loss of confidence when they encounter challenges because they believe that if they are truly “smart,” things will come easily to them. If they have to work hard at something, they tend to question their abilities and lose confidence, and they are likely to give up because they believe they are “not good” at the task and, because their intelligence is fixed, will never be good at it. Individuals with a growth mindset, on the other hand, show a far greater belief in the power of effort, and in the face of difficulty, their confidence actually grows because they believe they are learning and getting smarter as a result of challenging themselves. These research findings are especially important for women in science and engineering, because encountering obstacles and challenging problems is in the nature of scientific work. When girls and women believe they have a fixed amount of intelligence, they are more likely to lose confidence and disengage from science and engineering when they inevitably encounter difficulties in their course work. This is true for all students, but it is particularly relevant for girls in STEM subjects, where negative stereotypes persist about girls’ abilities. There are a number of steps we can take to foster a growth mindset in children: Recommendations Parents and teachers should teach children that intellectual skills can be acquired. When girls are taught that their intelligence can expand with experience and learning, girls do better on math tests and are more likely to want to continue to study math in the future. Praise children for effort Rather than saying “Oh, you’re so smart!”, when children do something well, say “Wow, you worked really hard at that and you did it!” It is especially important to praise the most able students for their effort. These students have often coasted along, gotten good grades, and been praised for their intelligence and may be the very students who opt out when the work becomes more difficult. Highlight the struggle. Parents and teachers can communicate to students that we value and admire effort and hard work. This will teach children the values that are at the heart of scientific and mathematical contributions: love of challenge, love of hard work, and the ability to embrace and learn from our inevitable mistakes. Talented and gifted programs should send the message that they value growth and learning, not just being “gifted” with intelligence.
  • Another finding presented in the report is in the area of spatial skills. One of the largest gender differences in cognitive abilities is found in the area of spatial skills, with boys and men consistently outperforming girls and women, especially on measures of mental rotation, an example of which is shown here. See if you can answer this question. Does anyone want to volunteer what the answer is? D. Spatial skills are considered by many people to be important for success in engineering and other scientific fields and are often considered to be “innate”. Research conducted by Sheryl Sorby over a decade with first year engineering students at Michigan Tech, however, documents that individuals’ spatial skills consistently improve dramatically in a short time with a simple training course. If girls grow up in an environment with opportunities to develop their spatial skills, they are more likely to consider a future in a science or engineering field. Recommendation Playing with building toys as well as drawing can help children develop their spatial skills.
  • The final research finding profiled in the report on how social and environmental factors affect girls’ achievement and interest in science and math is by sociologist Shelley Correll at Stanford University. Dr. Correll’s research finds that women are “harder on themselves” compared to their male peers when assessing their abilities in math and science. Dr. Correll first became interested in gender differences in self-assessment when she taught chemistry to high school students. She realized that no matter how well the girls in her classes did, she had trouble convincing them that they had any scientific ability. At the same time, she found that no matter how poorly the boys in her classes did, they continued to believe that they were very good at chemistry. Once she went to graduate school, she delved into this issue, analyzing a dataset of over 16,000 high school students, and found that, in fact, girls do assess their mathematical abilities lower than boys with similar past mathematical achievements. In a lab experiment on gender differences in self-assessment, Dr. Correll found that women assess themselves as less competent in “male” fields, even when the “male” field is fictitious. Here we have an example from this experiment. See if you can answer this question: Does this rectangle have more black or more white? [Pause] We won’t spend too much time here because it’s not actually important how much black or white there is, but what the results of the study showed. The answer is that there are equal amounts of black and white in the rectangle. In Dr. Correll’s experiment, she identified this fictitious ability to detect correct proportions of black and white as “contrast-sensitivity ability”. When participants were told that men were more likely to have high levels of “contrast-sensitivity ability”, women assessed their contrast-sensitivity ability lower than men did. When this ability was described as equally strong in men and women, gender differences in self-assessment were not found.
  • This gender difference in self-assessment is shown here in the chart on the left. [Explain chart well.] [Explanation of chart: The chart shows women’s self-assessments in green and men’s self-assessments in purple. When subjects were told that men are better at this task, men assessed their “contrast-sensitivity” abilities much higher than women. When subjects were told that there is no gender difference in performing this task, however, there was essentially no difference between how men and women assessed their abilities.] At the same time, girls held themselves to a higher standard than boys when told that men are better at “contrast-sensitivity” but men and women’s standards were nearly identical when told that there is no gender difference. This difference in standard is shown here in the chart on the right. [Explain chart.] [Explanation of chart: The chart shows students’ standards for their own performance. Women’s standards are in green and men’s standards in purple. When subjects were told that men are better at this task and then asked “how high would you have to score to believe that you have high ability in this area”, women said they would have to score around 89%. Men, in contrast, said they would have to score around 79%. This is a full 10 percentage point difference! When subjects were told that there is no gender difference in performing this task, however, there was essentially no difference between the standard that men and women held themselves to.] If you think about this finding as it relates to math and science, fields in which men are considered to excel, it suggests that girls believe that they have to be better in math and science than boys believe they have to be in order to think of themselves as good in these fields. There are many elements to choosing a career, but researchers agree that one element is believing that you can be successful at it. Girls’ lower self-assessment of their math ability, even in the face of good grades and test scores, along with their higher standard for performance in “masculine” fields, helps explain why fewer girls than boys aspire to science and engineering careers. So what can be done to reduce gender differences in self-assessment? Recommendations First, as many of you know, extremely low average test scores are common in many college science and engineering courses. Low scores increase uncertainty in all students, but they have a more negative effect on students who already feel like they don’t belong, as many women in science and engineering majors do. The same letter or number grade on an assignment or exam might signal something different to girls than it does to boys. Female students may need to be reminded that a B in a difficult course is a grade to be proud of. The more that teachers and professors can reduce uncertainty about students’ performance, the better. And second, girls are less likely than boys to interpret their academic successes in math and science as an indication that they have the skills necessary to become a successful engineer or computer scientist. Encourage girls to see their success in high school math and science for what it is: not just a requirement for going to college but also an indication that they have the skills to succeed in a whole range of science and engineering professions.
  • The second theme that comes out of the research is that the climate and culture in science and engineering departments at colleges and universities is especially important for female students and faculty.
  • As you can see from the chart shown here, among first year college students, women are less likely than men to say that they are interested in majoring in science, technology, engineering or math. The difference is most pronounced in engineering (shown in green) and computer science (shown in red). However, women are more likely to major in the biological/agricultural sciences. Yet this does not mean that colleges and universities are off the hook when it comes to increasing the number of women in STEM majors. Although fewer women than men come to college with the intention of pursuing a STEM field, two different research projects profiled in the report find that small changes to improve the climate of STEM departments in colleges and universities can make a big difference in attracting and retaining female students. Research by Barbara Whitten comparing “successful” physics departments (those where women were 40% of graduates) to more “typical” physics departments (those where women were about 20% of the graduates) along with research by Jane Margolis and Alan Fisher studying attrition and women in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University found that small changes in recruitment, admissions, the curriculum for instance can help to improve the climate of departments, and therefore, help to attract and keep female students. They recommend that departments that want to attract and retain diverse and talented students should: Actively recruit female students. This may seem obvious, but many departments don’t actively recruit students, they simply wait for students to come to them. They also encourage departments to offer introductory courses that emphasize the broad applications of science and technology and not focus only on the technical aspects of the subjects. This approach has been found to be helpful for attracting both male and female students, but especially female students. Third, admissions policies that require experience that will be taught in the curriculum (for example, requiring computer science major applicants to have significant prior computer programming experience when computer programming will be taught to students once they are admitted) may weed out potentially successful students, especially women. Revising admissions policies to send a more inclusive message about who can be successful in a STEM majors can help departments recruit more qualified, capable women.
  • The second finding on college climate looks at female faculty in STEM. [Explain chart] [Explanation of chart: This chart shows the percentage of tenured and non-tenured faculty who are women in selected STEM fields. First, it shows that women make up a smaller share of faculty in engineering, the physical sciences and computer and information sciences compared to the biological/life sciences (which is shown on the bottom of the graph). The second important trend we see here is that women make up a far smaller share of the tenured faculty in all these fields. This is significant because tenured positions are the more secure, high-paying and high-status positions in higher education.] Overall, there are fewer women in tenured positions in STEM fields than one would expect given the number of women earning PhDs in these fields. In the report, research by Cathy Trower and the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard University is presented. Dr. Trower and her colleagues found that a departmental climate was related to job satisfaction among both female and male faculty in STEM departments, but that women were less satisfied than their male colleagues with departmental climate, specifically their sense of “fit” or feeling like they belonged in their departments. Therefore, Trower recommends that: STEM departments in colleges and universities focus on “fit” to improve female faculty satisfaction. They can do this by: Providing mentoring for all junior faculty and Implementing effective work-life policies to support all faculty but especially women who often are responsible for the majority of care taking and household duties.
  • The third theme that comes out of our review of the literature is that bias, often unconscious, continues to limit women’s progress in scientific and engineering fields.
  • Research by Mahzarin Banaji, a former AAUW fellow, and her colleagues at Harvard University shows that even individuals who consciously reject negative stereotypes about women in science often still believe that science is better suited to men at an unconscious level. These unconscious beliefs or implicit biases may be more powerful than explicitly held beliefs and values simply because we are not aware of them. Banaji is a co-developer of the implicit association test (IAT) which anyone can take to learn more about their biases. The test is freely available online and is anonymous. Since the gender-science implicit association test was established in 1998, more than a half million people from around the world have taken it, and more than 70 percent of test takers more readily associated “male” with science and “female” with arts than the reverse. These tests are not an indication of what a person consciously believes, but rather an indication of what goes on unconsciously. Implicit bias may influence girls’ likelihood of identifying with and participating in math and science and contributes to bias in science and engineering fields in education and the workplace – even among people who support gender equity. So what can be done to combat these biases? Recommendations First, you can learn more about your implicit bias by taking the tests at the website shown here. And second, if you find that you do have biases (and most people do), you can take steps to address them. Simple steps such as learning more about female scientists and engineers, and having positive images of women in science in your office, classrooms and homes can help “reset” your biases.
  • And finally, the report presents research showing that not only do most people associate math and science with “male,” they often hold negative opinions of women in “masculine” jobs or positions, like scientists or engineers. This research by Madeline Heilman at New York University shows that people judge women to be less competent than men in “masculine” jobs unless women are clearly successful in their work. When a woman is clearly competent in a masculine job, she is considered to be less likable. Because both likability and competence are needed for success in the workplace, women in science and engineering fields can find themselves in a double bind. So what can be done? Recommendations First, raising awareness about bias against women in science and engineering is one step we can take to counteract it. Once men and women in science and engineering fields are aware that bias exists in these areas, they can work to interrupt the unconscious thought processes that lead to bias. For women in particular, knowing that gender bias exists in science and engineering fields can help them understand that if they encounter social disapproval, it is likely not personal. Additionally, research shows that clear criteria for success and transparent evaluation processes are helpful for anyone subject to bias, including women in science and engineering fields.
  • So Why So Few? The answer is all around us. Social and environmental factors influence us at home, at school and in the workplace. This report provides concrete recommendations based on recent research findings for what each of us can do to change our world to more fully open opportunities for girls and women in science and engineering fields. Like all AAUW research reports, this report will be influential only if we all help spread the word. Please share these findings with: Parents Teachers School principals PTAs Afterschool groups College Administrators and faculty Employers And others I encourage you to visit www.aauw.org to download the report for free by clicking on the “Research” tab or order a printed copy by clicking on “Shop AAUW”. Thank you very much.
  • Why So Few Women in STEM

    1. 2. Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
    2. 4. Women are underrepresented in many science and engineering occupations. Percentage of Employed STEM Professionals Who Are Women, Selected Professions, 2008 Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009, Women in the labor force: A databook (Report 1018) (Washington, DC), Table 11.
    3. 5. <ul><li>Eight research findings in three areas: </li></ul><ul><li>How social and environmental factors shape girls’ achievement and interest in math and science </li></ul><ul><li>The climate of college and university science and engineering departments </li></ul><ul><li>Continuing influence of bias </li></ul>Why So Few? presents evidence that social and environmental factors contribute to the underrepresentation of women and girls in STEM.
    4. 6. Girls’ achievements and interests in math and science are shaped by the environment around them.
    5. 7. Negative stereotypes about girls’ and women’s abilities in math and science adversely affect their performance in these fields. <ul><li>Expose girls to successful female role models in math and science. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach students about stereotype threat. </li></ul>Source: Spencer, S. J., Steele, C. M., & Quinn, D. M., 1999, &quot;Stereotype threat and women's math performance,&quot; Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 35(1), p. 13. Performance on a Challenging Math Test, by Stereotype Threat Condition and Gender
    6. 8. In math and science, a growth mindset benefits girls. <ul><li>Teach children that intellectual skills can be acquired. </li></ul><ul><li>Praise children for effort. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight the struggle. </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted and talented programs should send the message that they value growth and learning. </li></ul>Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset Intelligence is static. Intelligence can be developed. Leads to a desire to look smart and therefore a tendency to Leads to a desire to learn and therefore a tendency to <ul><li>avoid challenges </li></ul><ul><li>embrace challenges </li></ul><ul><li>give up easily due to obstacles </li></ul><ul><li>persist despite obstacles </li></ul><ul><li>see effort as fruitless </li></ul><ul><li>see effort as path to mastery </li></ul><ul><li>ignore useful feedback </li></ul><ul><li>learn from criticism </li></ul><ul><li>be threatened by others’ success </li></ul><ul><li>be inspired by others’ success </li></ul>
    7. 9. Spatial skills are not innate and can be improved with training. <ul><li>One of the largest and most persistent gender gaps in cognitive skills is found in the area of mental rotation, where boys consistently outperform girls. </li></ul>Playing with building toys as well as drawing can help children develop spatial skills.
    8. 10. Women are “harder on themselves” in terms of assessing their abilities in math and science fields. <ul><li>Does this rectangle have more black or more white? </li></ul>
    9. 11. <ul><li>Set clear performance standards </li></ul><ul><li>Help girls recognize their career-relevant skills </li></ul>
    10. 12. The climate of science and engineering departments at colleges and universities is especially important for women—both students and faculty.
    11. 13. At colleges and universities, small changes can make a big difference in attracting and retaining women in STEM. <ul><li>Actively recruit female students. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasize broad applications of science and engineering in introductory courses. </li></ul><ul><li>Review admissions policies to ensure that departments are not unintentionally “weeding out” potentially successful students. </li></ul>Source: Higher Education Research Institute, 2007, Survey of the American freshman: Special tabulations (Los Angeles, CA), cited in National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2009, Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering: 2009 (NSF 09-305) (Arlington, VA), Table B-8.
    12. 14. STEM departments in colleges and universities should focus on “fit” to improve female faculty satisfaction. Source: National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, 2009, Characteristics of doctoral scientists and engineers in the United States: 2006 (Detailed Statistical Tables) (NSF 09-317) (Arlington, VA), Authors’ analysis of Table 20. Percentage of Faculty Who Are Women <ul><li>Provide mentoring for junior faculty. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement effective work-life balance policies to support faculty. </li></ul>
    13. 15. Bias, often unconscious, limits women’s progress in scientific and engineering fields.
    14. 16. Implicit Bias <ul><li>Most people associate science and math fields with “male” and humanities and arts fields with “female.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take a test to learn about your unconscious bias at https://implicit.harvard.edu . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Take steps to address your biases. </li></ul></ul>
    15. 17. <ul><ul><li>Women in “male” jobs are viewed as less competent than their male peers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When women are clearly competent, they are often considered less “likable.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Raise awareness about bias against women in STEM fields. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create clear criteria for success. </li></ul></ul></ul>Bias against Women in Nontraditional Fields
    16. 18. Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics To download the report: www.aauw.org To contact the researchers: [email_address]

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