To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment    ...
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Social media and diversity & inclusion

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A LinkedIn conversation regarding the degree to which social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates. Hope you can join the conversation.

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Social media and diversity & inclusion

  1. 1. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment Account Type: Business Kevin Carter Add Connections Home Profile Contacts Groups Jobs Inbox 142 Companies More Groups Search Diversity - A World of Change Discussions Members Promotions Jobs Search More... Start a discussion « Previous 2 of 4 Next » NEW Restart your old discussions with one click. Browse my archived discussions » Share this Discussion http://lnkd.in/7rT73p To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? 6 days ago Updates: Last 7 Days Follow David Jack Register and 2 more commented on: Like Comment Stop Following Flag More Does diversity include gays & lesbians, bisexual and trans people? 2 minutes ago 84 comments 54 comments Ali Curi and 1 more commented on: HPNG Announces the Premier of HPNG Entrepreneurs 24 minutes ago 2 comments Show previous comments CB Jackson likes: Whats the sound of diversity and inclusion? Manmeet Singh Fox, ACC, SPHR • Thank you for a thought-provoking question and 47 minutes ago Like (4) conversation. Perhaps inclusion of pictures on social media sites will be a tool for furthering their discriminatory practices. Yet, I also believe there are several cultural changes afoot that are shifting some hardened beliefs about the "other" which will one See all updates » day build into a tsunami, as the younger generation coming up is freer of old baggage . Follow Manmeet In the past few years Ive come across many, many articles demonstrating that indeed, Singh the racial demographics of the US are shifting dramatically, gender demographics of the workforce are trending towards women; women across racial groups are earning advanced education degrees at a higher rate than men and thriving in a down economy; the rise of inter-racial marriage in the South is starting to erode some of the divisiveness of race even in the Deep South, where African Americans are beginning to return in large numbers. Individuals self-identifying as multiracial are a fast growing part of the population, and all these trends together are shifting the experience and reality of race/ethnicity/gender in the US. I agree with Kevin that all candidates entering the workforce now need to be very deliberate in how they brand themselves on social media so that it is truly advantageous for them. My continuing concern is not that diversity candidates arent or wont be given the opportunity to enter organizations (shifting, albeit still slowly), but that those who are given entree dont possess the cross cultural awareness or cultural competence to navigate/succeed within organizations where norms and expectations are still that everyone is the "same" once they enter the workplace, when they are not. I see FAR too many diversity candidates suffer from "Minority Failure to Thrive Syndrome" upon entering the corporate environment. Our work needs to focus on building cross cultural competence and bridges both inside and outside corporate organizations, and helping those organizations shed expectations for an organizational "melting pot" wherein everyone is, and behaves, and communicates Managers Choice exactly the same way upon crossing the port of entry. Discover Me Diversity - an update. - 4 days ago • Reply privately • Flag as inappropriate Nearly done in modifying our site for World of Change job seekers to advertise their availability free to thousands of companies in the Anita Cameron • I was just thinking that true diversity is diversity throughout, not just at US,UK and Canada the entry level. My former company was very diverse at the lowest level, but there Bill Bargas - ( 4,000 plus) See all » was/isnt any diversity in middle or upper management. That spoke volumes to me. 4 days ago Follow Anita Top Influencers This Week Sharon Love, M.Ed. Marc Brenman • Hi Manmeet, good points, but a few misconceptions, as least as the points apply to the US-- racial demographics are not shifting dramatically, but national origin or ethnic demographics are. That is because Latinos or Hispanics can be of any David Halbeisen race. As to "gender demographics of the workforce are trending towards women," the percent participation of women in the US workforce has topped out, and isnt trending Marc upward any more. Some laws passed by the conservative Congress and approved by Stop Following Mai Moua the conservative federal judiciary are making it harder for women to work and succeed. While the numbers of multi-racial families and individuals are rising, the percents are still tiny. And many of the individuals, while self-identifying as multi-racial, are stillhttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  2. 2. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment experiencing discrimination, because of what they "look" like to Anglos. I do not see this Amanda Perl as happening much: "shifting the experience and reality of race/ethnicity/gender in the US." Many Anglos are terribly afraid that "their" country is being taken away from them. The Southern Poverty Law Center recently came out with a study showing a rapid rise Tina McDaniel in hate groups in the US. The Tea Party, if not openly racist (though some of its members and leaders are) certainly has done nothing to improve race relations. I continue to have "concern...that diversity candidates arent or wont be given the opportunity to enter organizations." One little example: I recently looked at African- American enrollment in a major university in Virginia. African-Americans were enrolled at a rate about one-third their presence in the population. 4 days ago Kevin Carter • Thank you, Marc. I am noticing two trends .... a growing backlash of all things diversity that is sometimes communicated as simply as "why must we continue to discuss our differences" ..... and a growing push by Millennials to not be pulled down and defined by the prejudice of older generations. Within these winds, it is important than those who believe that diversity and inclusion is a force for productivity, innovation and unique collaboration use social media in a thoughtful and deliberate way to seen and heard. 4 days ago Manmeet Singh Fox, ACC, SPHR • Hi Marc, of course racism and discrimination continue to exist today - and the work to combat it socially and legislatively must be ongoing. Combating a many headed beast takes approaching it simultaneously from many angles, with many hands and many tools. My work is inside organizations, and there, I see internal barriers/resistance to Others once diversity is allowed in the door -- Follow Manmeet and then quickly shown the exit. Some could argue people still arent given entree Singh enough- and I agree, and yet there has been some shift, as I do see diversity candidates being given opportunities. On the other hand change begets resistance-- tired old cultural paradigms maintained in orgs that are providing jobs, and to your point, the Tea Party and anxiety of those who are afraid of the country (and their power in the existing social order) being taken away from them. My point, though, is that there are several other changes afoot socially which I optimistically (but not naively) believe will continue to build and help to shift the experience and reality of diversity, race and gender in years to come. Social media in that changing environment could be a tool for positive change and equalization, just as it could be used to discriminate. How many years a "tsunami" of such desired change will take to build and really reorganize current realities I cant predict, but I guess my perspective is to remain hopeful in the face of what I believe are multiple signposts of advance and change. 4 days ago Manmeet Singh Fox, ACC, SPHR • Well said, Kevin. 4 days ago Follow Manmeet Singh Marc Brenman • I second that, well-said, Kevin! 4 days ago Marc Stop Following Donna Coleman • Ditto Kevins comments. Id like for us to consider taking this discussion one step further...what are some of the ways that "... those who believe diversity and inclusion is a force for productivity, innovation and unique collaboration use social media in a thoughtful and deliberate way to seen and heard." Apparently, given the mere fact that we are having this discussion online, engaging multiple perspectives, Follow Donna we all believe in the power of social media...what might be some ways that we can up the ante? 4 days ago Marc Brenman • Exactly the right question, Donna! (Am I turning into the amen corner? ) Heres one example that I think was nicely done: In the last couple of weeks, after the third year Anglo female undergraduate at UCLA posted her hateful YouTube video about "Asians in the Library," a large number of Asian-Americans and AAPI groups posted documents and videos responding to her in very thoughtful and even humoroushttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  3. 3. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment Marc and loving ways. Even one parody of her was kind-hearted and not hateful. UCLA Stop Following realized it didnt have a diversity course requirement. She claims, however, to have received threats, and I think has withdraw from UCLA. But aside from these alleged threats, there are lessons to be learned in good ways to respond to hate in social media. I also have a paper on "What to do when the Nazis come to town" that I can provide, if anyone wants it. Send me an e-mail at mbrenman001@comcast.net (because I havent figured out how to send attachments via LinkedIn-- call me ignorant about social media...) 4 days ago Kevin Carter • Donna, Marc, I believe we begin by building relationships with those in the social media discipline and initiate the diversity and inclusion discussion. I have identified some organizations below: * http://www.linkedin.com/groups?viewMembers=&gid=66325&sik=1301240054664 * http://www.conference-board.org/councils/councildetail.cfm?councilid=50 * http://www.conference-board.org/councils/councildetail.cfm?councilid=204 I joined the first one and as a member of the Conference Board, I hope to build a relationships with the last two. We probably also need more people within the diversity field bypassing the traditional diversity conferences and speaking at conferences outside our discipline. 4 days ago Cassandra D. Caldwell, Ph.D. • If a company discriminates against candidates using photos, is that company really worth our time and talents? Hiding my identity is fruitless, because my appearance will eventually be revealed during a face-to-face interview. I would rather be invited to interview based on employers knowing that I am African- American than trying to hide it. It is what it is...I am African-American....love me or leave Cassandra D. me. :-) Stop Following 4 days ago Marc Brenman • Hi Kevin, could you tell us more about your idea? It sounds intriguing. How do people in those outfits control hateful content? I thought the folks who own/run social media platforms were pretty content neutral. Or are you thinking of something different. I completely agree with you that we in the social justice field spend too much time preaching to the converted and need to spend more time talking with those who Marc are "neutral" or not inclined to agree with us. I applaud your efforts. Stop Following 3 days ago Kevin Carter • Hi Marc, well, my undeveloped idea :), is that diversity professionals identify one or two organizations, and there respective major conferences, that are not our field (such as social media, operational excellence, six sigma, etc.) and make a concerted effort to get on the agenda to discuss how diversity and inclusion relates, or aids that field. We need to have challenging and candid conversations with individuals who are Six Sigma Black Belts; Communication Experts, etc. about how their efforts are furthered when they acknowledge, understand and leverage the commonalities and differences of others. 3 days ago Marc Brenman • Terrific idea, Kevin! Count me in. Ive been trying to talk with corporate social responsibility and organization development people about diversity (not as tough as the fields you mention), and have gotten an okay reception. 3 days ago Marc Stop Following Donna Coleman • @Marc and Kevin...I am so excited by this discussion. Since I left NTL, I have been working in the nonprofit arena. I am particularly interested and passionate about education. However, it is challenging to see all of these national (and local) organizations focused on "at risk" (code speak for children of color) children; but, who are clueless about how the issues of diversity and inclusion play or should play into Follow Donna their intervention designs and the capacity of those teachers, trainers, etc to implement those interventions. Most of the evaluators are also clueless about the underlying cultural aspects at play. Everyone seems to feel that because they were students, or parent children, they know how to impact these children. In many instances, they arehttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  4. 4. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment missing the boat because they dont understand the underlying cultural motivators. Thus, they are spending significant funds with minimal impact because they are designing from a very limited paradigm. I am so ready to have this discussion...but, it has been my experience that educators tend to be less open than most. 3 days ago Marc Brenman • As always, interesting points, Donna. I wonder if corporate and profession trainers are any more sensitive than public school teachers? Following up on Kevins suggestion, I wonder if trainers could be convinced to include diversity, and following up your suggestion, Donna, carry out training in a culturally competent way? 3 days ago Marc Stop Following Donna Coleman • Marc, I really dont feel that they are. Lets use for example, companies like Pearson Learning and Hougton Mifflin. They have trainers who train teachers on how to use applications that are "specifically designed" to remediate these at-risk students. Certainly, they know how to train on the technical aspects of their product; however, based upon my experience, they are clueless about the challenges of Follow Donna working with the students on these applications and the impact of non-academic issues on these young peoples ability to focus on the application. If these programs were designed to incorporate all of these aspects from the beginning...i.e. if diversity professionals were included from the beginning through training the trainers, it would make for a much more effective product resulting in a much more impactful intervention- -real outcomes for children...now thats really CSR (at least in the education publishing industry). 3 days ago Marc Brenman • Great ideas, Donna. How do we avoid that Rudy Payne "culture of poverty" stuff? 3 days ago Marc Stop Following Donna Coleman • Marc, Rudy Payne...acknowledge and ignore... as I understand, her "research" is based on generational poverty in a "mostly white" community--so, they certainly wouldnt be inclusive and culturally sensitive . Wed just make a case for using our approach to change. 3 days ago Follow Donna Marc Brenman • Yes, a positive approach. Another model is that used by some universities for diversity admissions: overcame difficulty, faced challenges successfully, first person in the family to go to college, etc. But is that too much like the "at risk" model? Or use the diversity return on investment model; "Heres what is gained by hiring people who are currently underrepresented in the firms workforce..." Marc 3 days ago Stop Following David Halbeisen • Thank you everyone for your comments on this topic. As the opening act for this question, I feel compelled to add my own two cents. I think that social media, not just the photo, but the content as well, are damaging to candidates. Social media forces us to play this game or be left behind. My opinion is that control of information about ourselves will be removed from our own hands. Sure there is a Follow David pretense to enhance our professional experience using social media, but every coin has two sides. As a diversity professional, (gay) I am aware that there are laws, but cultural competence cannot be legislated. I readily accept differences of opinion, but social media is akin to a white sheet; were just not sure whose looking at us. 3 days ago Donna Coleman • David, thanks your question has been very generative. I agree with you that social media can be threatening. However, I find it no different in f2f (supposedly) communication. I have seen much damage done to careers and reputations behind individuals backs (hooded sheets) while smiling in their faces--just unconscionable. Theres an old song that says...smiling faces tell lies. So, I guess from Follow Donna my perspective both social media and f2f communication offer challenges...we have just been lulled into believing that we have some "control" over f2f because we have been playing this game much longer. 3 days agohttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  5. 5. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment Kevin Carter • Hi David, I truly appreciate your comments and have empathy for your concerns. I actually believe social media places more control of my persona, or brand, in my hands. As opposed to being a resume in a file, or a voice mail message, social media provides me with the opportunity to share and communicate my beliefs, values and expertise transparently. I really dont have a concern about who is looking at me, or judging me, as long as I have the ability to project my authentic self. Just as there are many people who would have bias towards me because of my race, gender, style and beliefs, there are many who would offer friendship and assistance because they feel a commonality and a shared purpose. Social media provides me with the opportunity to make those connections, if I am willing to assume some risk and take prudent care regarding what I am communicating. 2 days ago Donna Coleman • Excellent comments Kevin! Thank you for sharing your authenticity. 2 days ago Follow Donna Heather Buen • Wonderful discussion and comments. We also need to open our minds to other types of discrimination that are not so obvious as to race or gender. For instance some people will post a photo of their children and you may have some employers that feel if they hire someone with children, that person may not be fully committed to the company. Especially if the persons relationship status is single. I just Follow Heather participated in a discussion where single moms are discriminated against because they tend to carry stereotypes of their own. 1 day ago Laura Dahlberg • Hello, I recently joined this group and the topics discussed here are pretty interesting. @Marc, perhaps we cannot contact decisions makers directly through social media, but we could use it to find out the associations where they participate and try to approach them there. If they are on linkedIn, we could try asking a mutual connection to introduce Follow Laura each other, or at least get some background info about them. We have to be creative and should use social media to our advantage. @Donna, I’m originally from Peru and job candidates there are still required to attach to their resumes a color, passport sized picture. 1 day ago Kevin Carter • Hi Heather, You are correct. I have experienced recruiters coaching candidates not to discuss their family, or civic, interests so that they do not appear distracted from their employment. Unfortunately, the most successful companies learn that allowing an employee to bring their whole self to work is what fuels discretionary effort and innovation. Hi Laura, I agree with you as well. Social media is a tool; one diverse candidates did not have in years past. My emphasis is: do we let others define us, or do we define ourselves? 18 hours ago Donna Coleman • @Laura (or anyone from a country that requires pics on resume). What were the reasons? Did it raise any concerns for you? I know when I applied for the Bar in a certain state, I had to include my pic; and, I immediately became suspect that it would be used as an exclusionary tactic particularly if my scores were borderline. Since I passed the exam, I have no proof of its use. However, I do know that most Follow Donna states discontinued requiring a picture because in some instances it was used to exclude. 17 hours ago Marc Brenman • Hi Kevin, is this really true? "the most successful companies learn that allowing an employee to bring their whole self to work is what fuels discretionary effort and innovation." I can see that happy people might be more productive, but their whole self? I recall lots of time being spent talking about pets, cakes, sports, and celebrities, going to Facebook, shopping online, etc. Perhaps you mean those characteristics of Marchttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  6. 6. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment people which are consistent with the needs of the employer. I do think that supervisors Stop Following have to learn how to cope with that whole self, including how to deal with those parts of the whole self that are problematic. 17 hours ago Kevin Carter • Hi Marc, I do mean whole self. Now, however, I am moving more into my belief than proven fact. I believe breakthrough innovation happens when very different inputs, experiences and opinions come together. So, if you are looking for process innovation, what experiences do you tell the employee to leave at home - their success running a church missionary; their hobby of reading about mobile technology; their combat experience, etc. How do you know what experience, or expertise might be matched with those of others to create a new product, or process that benefits the company? Now, there should be ground rules around respect and a focus on business outcomes, but how do you know what aspect of a person they should hide, or not share? 17 hours ago Marc Brenman • Cmon, Kevin, youve been around the barn; I think you know what Im talking about. Im sure you dont want alcohol and drugs in the workplace, or violence, or an employees tendency to domestic abuse or anger or firearms. Chances are, you dont want smoking or gambling or Facebooking or online shopping or smelly grooming either. You probably dont want a person who posts nasty vicious comments about your Marc diversity program on the outside of his cubicle (the 9th Circuit decision a few years ago). Stop Following There are plenty of parts of the whole self we dont want at work... 16 hours ago Kevin Carter • Marc, I would agree - "whole self" - is an overstatement. I think most of the behaviors you list would violate most companies values and behavioral standards. I also dont think these behaviors could be re-directed towards business outcomes. Now, the Facebooking, online shopping, and constructive feedback (even if harsh) regarding diversity programs, might be redirected towards business value. I am not suggesting employees be allowed to engage in these activities throughout the day but I would not be surprised if many companies have recruiters spending most of their day Facebooking. I am pushing the envelope here, obviously, there is a middle ground. 16 hours ago Holly Glen Gearhart • @Kevin & @ Marc, * Kevin writes, " I would not be surprised if many companies have recruiters spending most of their day Facebooking."-- they are, in fact, doing so. Cruising FB, along with other web "detective" surfing techniques is common practice among HR and recruitment Follow Holly circles. Glen If you doubt my statement, you should check with your local WorkSource office for verification. Is this eye opening? No, not so much-- take time to read Caroline Kennedys ( with Ellen Alderman) book on the loss of privacy circa 1997, The Right to Privacy, Vintage Books. We have never had faceless freedom of speech-- and the Web in certainly no different. Indeed it is limiting what we DID have even more. 15 hours ago Oilid Mountassar • I feel that in this discussion we are focusing a lot on all the nice things about diversity and not talking about the reasons behind recruiters trying to "discriminate" based on information they have in social media. The new hire will have to join a team in place and a company who already has its own culture so the basic question is: how would the new hire fit in? What impact will this have on his and the Follow Oilid team performance? Even companies who are heavilly involved in diversity, would discriminate on poeple who would for example be openly racist or homophobic etc...and who wouldnt fit thier standard. I think that it is important to consider the "whole self" but there are parts of us that are not needed in the work place now and maybe ever. It s all about creating an environement where we respect each others "visible" differences and create the right environment for employees to feel secure in bringing up their "invisible" differences when needed for the company. @Marc: I like your provocative comments. 10 hours agohttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]
  7. 7. To what degree does social media perpetuate discrimination of diversity candidates? | LinkedIn#lastComment#lastComment Add a comment... Send me an email for each new comment. Add Comment Help Center About Blog Careers Advertising Recruiting Solutions Tools Mobile Developers Publishers Language Upgrade My Account LinkedIn Corporation © 2011 User Agreement Privacy Policy Copyright Policy Send Feedbackhttp://www.linkedin.com/...tem?view=&gid=56579&type=member&item=48277075&commentID=-1&qid=60c60553-e0f5-4fd1-8db4-2876a63daf07#lastComment[3/31/2011 12:56:20 PM]

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