CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE
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CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE

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CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE Presentation Transcript

  • 1. GUIDED BY : ADITI JOSHI SUBMITTED BY : JUHI MODI CODE : 0923 SEM : VI
  • 2. INTRODUCTION  Design, Architecture, Culture brings together the best critical work on the analysis of all types of spaces.  Interiors play a crucial role in the construction of identity and they represent power and control through the contestation or transgression of boundaries.  Homes, offices, shopping malls, schools and hospitals, churches and restaurants are all embedded with meaning and evince particular, multi-sensory and psychological responses.
  • 3. CHRISTIAN ARCHITECTURE  Attempt to represent the City of God on Earth; churches meant to glorify God  Often featured a “cross” design  Used imagery to teach  Pulpit replaces the altar as the dominant feature; churches became less ostentatious and focus more on words, rather than images
  • 4. Through The Centuries  597 St Augustine arrived in Kent and soon established the first Cathedral  1070-1077 Cathedral rebuilt by Archbishop Lanfranc  1098-1130 New Quire built over a Crypt  1170 Thomas Becket murdered in the Cathedral  1175-1184 Quire rebuilt.  1220 Becket's body placed in new Shrine in Trinity Chapel  1377-1405 Lanfranc Nave demolished and rebuilt as seen today  1450 Pulpitum Screen constructed  1498 Bell Harry Tower extended and the Cathedral largely complete as seen today  1538 Becket's Shrine destroyed by Henry VIII  1540 Monastery dissolved by royal command  1541 New Foundation of Dean and Chapter established  1660-1704 Repair and refurbishing after Puritan damage  1834North West tower rebuilt  1954 Library rebuilt  1986 altar of the Sword's Point restored  1988 Compass Rose placed in the Nave  2000 International Study Centre opened in the Precincts.
  • 5. Life in England was dominated by the feudal system. Learn about feudalism during the times in sections on the Feudalism Pyramid, Feudal Justice and the eventual Decline of Feudalism. The most important and interesting aspects and facts about feudalism in times have been comprehensively detailed including sections on the Feudalism Pyramid, Medieval Feudalism, European Feudalism, the Feudal System, Feudal Justice and the Decline of Feudalism. For additional facts and information please refer to Feudalism Pyramid, Feudal Justice and European Feudalism.
  • 6. BRIEF DESCRIPTION Canterbury Cathedral located in Canterbury, Kent at United Kingdom. It’s the famous church in England. The church is constructed in Romanesque and Gothic style in the year 1070-1834.  Its total Length is 157 metres (515 ft), in which Nave Length is 178 feet (54 m) and Choir Length is 180 feet (55 m).  Its Nave Width is 71 feet (22 m), Nave Height is 80 feet (24 m) and Choir Height is 71 feet (22 m).  The church includes 3 Towers of 72 metres (236 ft) Height and 1 Spire of 58 metres (190 ft) Height.
  • 7. CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site.  It is the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion.  Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury.  Established in 597 CE by St. Augustine who had been sent from Rome as a missionary by Pope Gregory the Great. Under the orders from the Pope, St. Augustine stayed in Canterbury and became its first Archbishop.
  • 8. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt 1070- 77. The east end was greatly enlarged at the beginning of the twelfth century, and largely rebuilt in the Gothic style following a fire in 1174. The Norman nave and transepts survived until the late fourteenth century, when they were demolished to make way for the present structures. The number of pilgrimages that have been made to the Cathedral have actually worn down the steps at the front entrance of the building. Canterbury Cathedral is both a church and the site of a historic event, it has established itself as an extremely powerful religious site within Catholicism.
  • 9. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE St Martin’s Church, the ruins of St Augustine’s Abbey, and Christ Church Cathedral together reflect milestones in the history of Christianity in Britain. The reintroduction of Christianity to southern Britain by St Augustine, commencing at St Martin’s Church where Queen Bertha already worshipped, and leading to the conversion of King Ethelbert. The successive architectural responses to Canterbury’s developing role as focus of the Church in England – adaptation of Roman buildings, the development of Anglo- Saxon building in mortared brick and stone, and the flowering of Romanesque and Gothic.
  • 10.  Canterbury’s importance as a pilgrimage centre based on Augustine and its other early saints was transformed by the murder and canonization of Archbishop Thomas Becket.  The wealth and power of the Cathedral in the 12th century, when the offerings of large numbers of pilgrims helped the building of the magnificent enlargement of the east end, with its exceptional stained glass windows and the rebuilding of the choir and transepts following the fire of 1174.  The Cathedral’s rich panorama of Romanesque, early Gothic, and late Gothic art and architecture.  The establishment of Canterbury as the seat of the spiritual leader of the Church of England.  Criterion (i): Christ Church Cathedral, especially the east sections, is a unique artistic creation. The beauty of its architecture is enhanced by a set of exceptional early stained glass windows which constitute the richest collection in the United Kingdom.
  • 11.  Christ Church Cathedral, a major building of medieval architecture.  To the east, partially covering a huge Romanesque crypt with admirably carved capitals, is some of the most beautiful architectural space of early Gothic art: the choir, the east transept, an unfinished apse, on either side of which stand Romanesque chapels dedicated to St Andrew and St Anselm, Trinity Chapel and the circular Corona Chapel.  The two architects, William of Sens, a Frenchman, and William the Englishman, worked at the site from 1174 to 1184.  To the west the nave and the facade, with their very pure Perpendicular style, provide balance to the constructions on the eastern side.  The architecture and remarkable stained glass and furnishings of Canterbury Cathedral thus provide a complete panorama of Gothic art, from its earliest beginnings to its culmination and decline.
  • 12. EXTERIOR VIEW OF CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL
  • 13. CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL KENT INTERIOR OF BENEATH INTERIOR OF NAVE INTERIOR OF QUIER
  • 14. GOTHIC SOUTHWEST TRANSEPT AND TOWER (LEFT) AND ROMANESQUE SOUTHEAST TRANSEPT AND TOWER (RIGHT) ROMANESQUE (12TH CENTURY) STAIRCASE TOWER ON THE SOUTHEAST TRANSEPT, DECORATED WITH COPIOUS AMOUNTS OF BLIND ARCHE
  • 15. 12TH-CENTURY ROMANESQUE CARVED CAPITALS ON THE EXTERIOR OF THE SOUTHEAST TRANSEPT GOTHIC SOUTHWEST PORCH, BUILT 1424-25 BY THOMAS MAPILTON AND 1455-59 BY RICHARD BEKE AND RESTORED WITH NEW STATUES BY THEODORE PFYFFERS IN 1862
  • 16. VAULT ALTAR AND PULPIT IN THE EAST PART OF THE NAVE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TO THE CHOIR SCREEN CHOIR SCREEN
  • 17. POINTED ARCHES, RIB VAULTING AND FLYING BUTTRESSES,etc elements are used as GOTHIC STYLE.
  • 18. Plan of Canterbury Cathedral showing the richly complicated ribbing of the Perpendicular vaulting in the nave and transepts
  • 19. BULIDING MATERIALS Stone was a relatively expensive building material and was used mostly for well-funded projects, where durability across generations was essential and sheer size practically necessitated stone
  • 20. BULIDING MATERIALS  The medieval stained glass windows in Canterbury Cathedral are among the earliest and finest in Europe.  The oldest window, a charming depiction.  South window, West window, North Choir Aisle,etc all windows are constructed in stained glass material.
  • 21. ELEMENTS  Nave and Aisle Roofs: Essential repairs to stonework around the clerestory windows and tracery. Re-leading of nave roof and repairs to flying buttresses.  Bell Harry Tower: Critical works to the Cathedral’s most imposing structure – preparatory photogrammetric studies followed by major work on the carvings, pinnacles and stone facings, many of which are over 500 years old.  North West Transept: An area of the Cathedral that is particularly difficult to access and has suffered extreme weather damage. Fundamental structural work within the roof to replace timber supporting battens and concrete wall casings. Removal of existing lead, re-casting and re-leading of roof.
  • 22.  South East Transept: Around £0.5 million is still needed to complete the stonemasonry work on the South East Transept. This structure dates from the Romanesque period and is one of the oldest parts of the Cathedral having survived all major fires.  Library and Archives: Funding is needed to ensure that the Cathedral’s precious collection of books and manuscripts is preserved for future generations. Specialist conservation treatment is required on paper, parchment, book-bindings and photographs. Funds are also required to expand and enhance access, using information technology to make books and documents available to a worldwide audience. Improvements are needed to the fabric of the library buildings including improvements to the insulation to control temperatures inside the building, replacement of worn-out copper roofs and conservation of 17th Century stone and brickwork.
  • 23.  The Corona Chapel: Work on the North side of the Corona Chapel including conservation to eight stone pinnacles and the staircase tower.  Christ Church Gate : Full conservation of the 15th Century gateway to the Precincts including repair of the 17th Century wooden gates which replace those burnt in the Civil War.  Stained glass: For conservation of stained glass and surrounding stonework throughout the Cathedral including around £500k for the South Oculus window – one of the world’s finest surviving examples of a late 12th Century round window.
  • 24. THANK YOU