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Putting Great KM Ideas into Practice
 

Putting Great KM Ideas into Practice

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The importance of understanding our data, our tools and having the vision to implement successful KM ideas.

The importance of understanding our data, our tools and having the vision to implement successful KM ideas.

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    Putting Great KM Ideas into Practice Putting Great KM Ideas into Practice Document Transcript

    • The  %tle  of  this  session  is  incredibly  broad  –  what’s  ECM?  And  what’s  a  great  KM  idea?  –  We  have  spent  many  long-­‐distance  phone  calls  trying  to  agree  a  shared  understanding  for  this  presenta%on.  We  recognise  therefore  that  there  are  probably  as  many  ways  to  interpret  this  topic  as  there  are  of  you  here  today.  But  we  hope  that  there’s  enough  here  for  you  each  to  take  away  something  useful.   1  
    • Speaker  Bio:  Kate  has  spent  over  10  years  designing  usable  informa%on  spaces  for  the  legal  industry.  She  ini%ally  took  her  legal  educa%on  to  one  of  the  early  pioneers  in  online  legal  publishing,  developing  deep  exper%se  in  informa%on  architecture,  content  strategy  and  the  design  of  useful,  usable  and  engaging  user  experiences.  In  2007,  Kate  started  her  own  consul%ng  prac%ce  where  she  worked  with  the  U.K.s  leading  law  firms  to  design  and  execute  innova%ve  digital  strategies.  Now  in  Canada,  Kate  is  a  passionate  advocate  for  puRng  users  first  and  ensuring  firms  have  the  right  informa%on  architecture,  processes  and  governance  to  leverage  their  extensive  technology  investments.     2  
    • Respect  to  Mark  here  for  this  quote  that  inspired  our  theme  and  we’ve  used  to  structure  our  session  this  aUernoon   3  
    • That  quote  leads  us  to  ask:  how  do  we  turn  these  great  blocks  of  marble…   4  
    • …into  something  useful,  beau%ful  and  %meless?   5  
    • I  think  the  answer  may  lie  in  the  power  of  threes  (and  I  don’t  mean  your  three  panellists…)   6  
    • This  is  our  ECM/KM  Triangle.  We  have  come  up  with  what  we  think  are  3  of  the  key  issues  within  the  3  points  of  this  triangle  (Data  –  Tools  –  Vision).    If  you’re  aaemp%ng  to  turn  a  great  KM  idea  into  something  tangible  then  you  need  to  make  room  for  each  of  these  during  your  project.  I  will  make  three  brief  points  about  each  of  these  components  before  handing  over  to  Karen  and  Mark  to  show  you  how  they  have  put  their  great  KM  ideas  into  prac%ce     7  
    • A  word  about  triangles:  whilst  we  acknowledge  that  some  of  our  project  triangles  tend  to  force  us  to  make  compromises…   8  
    • …  that  does  not  make  them  impossible  to  use  as  guides  for  project  success.   9  
    • So,  first  up,  our  data.  Our  big  blocks  of  marble  siRng  unformed.   10  
    • As  they  say:  if  in  doubt,  go  Dilbert.    (Here’s  one  from  September  2001  about  the  badness  of  data.  Apologies  to  those  reading  these  slides  in  handouts  but  I  only  bought  the  license  for  presenta%on  use.)    Our  data  is  locked  in  silos.  Even  if  we  know  what  we  own;  its  value  is  oUen  unknown.    Some  of  us  are  having  some  successes  using  tools  to  extract  and  analyse  this  data  (which  Mark  covers  in  his  presenta%on).     11  
    • One  of  the  primary  reasons  Dilbert’s  boss  can’t  “manage”  is  because  oUen  our  data  has  no  referen%al  integrity.    It’s  amazing  what  mashups,  BI  reports,  and  new  paaerns  for  decision-­‐making  can  be  formed  by  joining  data  using  unique  keys  (Client  ID,  Maaer  ID,  Document  ID,  TimeKeeper  ID)  and  that  allow  the  metadata  added  throughout  the  lifecycle  to  be  inherited,  referenced  and  used  in  new  ways.    One  firm  –  let’s  call  them  Firm  Leonardo  has  figured  this  out  early.  Each  new  KM  idea  allows  them  to  tackle  another  element  of  their  data  referen%al  integrity  process  and  clean  it  up.  Other  firms  –  let’s  call  this  one  Firm  Donatello  prefers  to  hide  their  head  in  the  sand  and  will  buy  the  next  ‘silver  bullet’  technology  in  the  hope  that  something  can  auto-­‐magically  be  done  about  it  rather  than  rolling  up  one’s  sleeves  and  geRng  your  hands  dirty  with  the  data  to  join  it  up.   12  
    • Is  there  a  firm  leU  on  the  planet  that  hasn’t  realised  that  the  quality  of  their  data  is  just  a  bit  rubbish?  Dear  Oscar  at  Old  Street  on  my  way  to  work  in  London  town.  Rubbish  In.  Rubbish  Out.    For  Dilbert’s  Boss  to  be  able  to  ‘manage  data’  we  need  to  make  sense  of  it.    It  needs  standardizing,  normalizing,  reconciling.  It  needs  untangling.  It  needs  cleaning  and  cleansing  to  create  more  accurate,  reliable  and  useful  outputs  on  an  ECM  planorm  (such  as  we  will  show  on  SharePoint  or  Recommind).   13  
    • Before  Leonardo,  portraits  of  women  were  in  profile,  showing  only  half  the  face  and  nothing  below  the  shoulders.    Here  Leonardo  turns  the  subject  almost  full  on  towards  the  viewer,  and  includes  her  hands  -­‐  as  if  to  say,  "Here  she  is,  all  of  her,  fully  revealed."    But  of  course  hes  only  shown  the  parts  of  her  fit  for  public  consump%on.    The  personal  and  private  remain  hidden  behind  that  smile  and  those  eyes.    We  need  to  know  what  can  and  should  be  shared  with  others.    We  need  to  know  how  to  reassure  lawyers  that  revealing  some  informa%on  is  OK.  We  need  to  find  the  data  that  is  strictly  private  or  strictly  personal  and  lock  that  down.    We’ve  all  heard  the  stories  from  firms  about  what  can  inadvertently  get  revealed  during  some  of  these  KM/ECM  projects.  Mark  &  Karen/Suzanne  also  have  stories  to  share.  We  can  learn  from  these  stories  and  examples  and  be  prepared  to  build  in  the  %me  to  fully  analyse  and  crunch  the  data  so  we  avoid  making  the  same  mistakes.   14  
    • Secondly,  our  tools.  How  we’ll  use  what  we  have  (or  buy  new  ones)  to  get  what  we  want.   15  
    • As  Mark  says:  there  is  more  than  one  way  to  skin  a  cat  to  deliver  our  projects  –  but  please  not  this  one   16  
    • Finally  within  the  walls  of  our  law  firms,  we  now  have  access  to  some  of  the  shiniest  technologies  around.  Huge  powerhouses  of  func%onality  and  even,  shockingly,  some  beau%fully  designed  tools  too.    Like  those  working  in  funkier  industries  have  been  using  for  years.    Some  of  these  disrup%ng  technologies  may  be,  well,  disrup%ve,  but  the  same  ques%ons  are  common  to  them  all:  -­‐  What  do  our  tools  actually  do?  -­‐  Let’s  do  some  feature  analysis;  how  can  we  get  what  we  want  from  our  data  using   these  tools?  -­‐  How  much  configura%on  is  that  going  to  involve?  -­‐  How  much  should  we  s%ck  with  OOTB?  We  know  that  it  will  simplify  any  upgrade   process  in  the  long-­‐term  but  may  limit  us  to  only  thinking  within  that  “paint-­‐by-­‐ numbers”  box  in  the  short  term.   17  
    • Enterprise  Content  Management  projects,  of  the  kinds  Karen/Suzanne  and  Mark  are  going  to  talk  about,  and  more  besides,  involve  integra%on.    To  build  our  intranets,  portals,  exper%se,  maaer  &  client  pages  and  extranets,  KM  systems,  Enterprise  Search,  content  cura%on  &  current  awareness  solu%ons,  financial  dashboards  and  so  on,  all  involve  mashing  up  our  data  and/or  integra%ng  applica%ons.    On  the  one  hand  we  have  data  integra%on  involving  ETL  tools  and  SQL  (and  therefore  indexing  that  data  as  Mark  will  describe).  While  on  the  other  we  have  applica%on  integra%on  for  SOA,  with  API  calls  to  systems  pulling  back  data  for  displaying  on  a  new  UI  (such  as  SharePoint  that  Suzanne  will  explain)   18  
    • Sadly  most  of  our  tools  have  poor  user  experiences.  The  UIs  are  poorly  designed.  They  are  not  usable,  useful  or  engaging.  Whilst  ‘design’  is  oUen  forgoaen  by  vendors  on  the  tools  we  buy  off  the  shelf,  we  have  the  opportunity  to  focus  on  designing  intui%ve  user  experiences  on  our  internal  projects.    Not  just  that  the  interface  ‘looks  preay’  and  matches  the  corporate  colours,  but  that  it  is  task-­‐oriented  for  our  lawyers  and  follows  core  user-­‐centred  design  processes  (more  about  that  in  a  mo).   19  
    • In  my  experience  soUware  is  just  a  small  propor%on  of  the  total  cost  of  introducing  and  running  a  system.  We  need  to  understand  what’s  really  involved  to  deliver  our  projects  on  %me,  to  budget,  and  meet  our  users’  expecta%ons.    We  also  need  to  remember  that,  as  always,  the  tools  are  our  enablers  (even  if  they  may  be  cooler  and  funkier  tools  nowadays).    It  is  what  we  do  with  those  tools  that  makes  the  difference.   20  
    • And  therefore  you  need  a  vision.  You  need  to  understand  what  it  is  you  want.   21  
    • And  design  maaers.  We  need  visionaries  and  visions  for  what  we  want  to  get  out  of  our  data  and  use  our  tools  for.  We  aaend  conferences  like  this  one  and  listen  to  the  visions  that  others  have  –  such  as  those  that  Karen  and  Mark  will  describe.  We  listen  to  vendors  as  they  describe  what’s  possible  with  their  tools.  We  read  inspiring  ar%cles  and  case  studies  to  let  our  imagina%ons  escape  the  box.    Allowing  us  to  see  David  within  that  block  of  marble,  or  a  Monet  on  that  blank  canvas.  Or  indeed  a  beau%ful  phone.   22  
    • Apprecia%ng  and  leveraging  the  design  skills  of  your  team  is  important.    The  design  of  your  solu%on  both  architecturally  and  its  user  interface  impacts  the  success  of  your  project.  But  as  we  know,  law  firms  are  a  difficult  place  for  design  to  really  flourish;  ‘design-­‐by-­‐commiaee’  is  a  derogatory  term  applied  to  anything  that  has  been  poorly  designed.  This  problem  is  oUen  compounded  at  firms  where  the  commiaee  is  lacking  any  formal  design  skills  so  that  the  only  topic  that  the  team  have  any  confidence  in  expressing  is  the  colour  of  the  UI.    But  while  we’re  not  all  lucky  enough  to  have  a  Steve  Jobs  to  refer  design  decisions  to,  or  a  professional  designer  on-­‐staff,  we  can  employ  good  co-­‐crea%on  or  collabora%ve  design  prac%ces  by  leveraging  the  design  skills  of  our  team.  And  whilst  you’ll  s%ll  need  a  final  arbiter  or  decision-­‐maker  during  the  design  process,  your  focus  should  be  on  finding  a  good  cross-­‐func%onal,  mul%-­‐disciplinary  team  that  share  the  vision  for  the  project  and  can  work  well  together  discussing,  researching  and  tes%ng  design  op%ons.    This  approach  will  help  avoid  many  of  the  pinalls  of  commiaee  design.   23  
    • Good  IT/KM  projects  map  core  architectural  and  design  objec%ves  to  the  business’  needs  and  goals.  How  oUen  do  we  hear  “Make  it  like  Google”?  (Or  has  that  now  been  replaced  with  “Make  it  like  my  iPad”?)  But  what  does  that  actually  mean?  What  are  the  underlying  design  and  architectural  principles  that  can  turn  the  business  objec%ve  for  ‘maaer  pages’  into  clear  design  principles,  such  as  making  sure  there  is  lots  of  white  space  on  the  UI?  Core  design  principles  or  ‘heuris%cs’  for  designing  web  interfaces  or  search  pages  exist  on  the  Web  and  can  help  inform  your  future  decision-­‐making  as  you  design,  build  and  test.     24  
    • And  finally,  great  ideas  need  communica%ng!  You  need  to  communicate  your  vision  to  mul%ple  stakeholders  throughout  the  firm:  -­‐  to  the  board  for  ongoing  cost  and  execu%ve  decision-­‐making  -­‐  to  the  technical  team  to  build  the  vision  into  something  tangible  -­‐  to  end  users  for  buy-­‐in  and  adop%on  Designers  and  architects  oUen  use  models  to  achieve  a  shared  vision  amongst  mul%ple  stakeholders,  such  as  this  one  made  of  Christopher  Wren’s  early  design  of  St  Paul’s.  Builders  couldn’t  read  complicated  architectural  blueprints  –  a  model  like  this  made  such  shared  communica%on  possible.  Similarly  informa%on  architects  might  draw  up  wireframes  and  other  models  to  show  the  business  what  it  is  that  will  be  built,  and  that  also  show  technical  teams  what  needs  to  be  built.   25  
    • OK,  so  that’s  enough  of  pondering  the  conceptual  and  abstract,  now  onto  the  prac%cal…   26  
    • And  now  here’s  Suzanne  from  Ropes  &  Gray  to  discuss  her  firm’s  great  KM  idea  that’s  been  put  into  prac%ce…   27