Embedding Strengthening Families in Professional Development for Child Welfare Staff C E N T E R  F O R  T H E  S T U D Y ...
why is the Protective Factors Framework important to child welfare?   <ul><li>Children zero to five are the fastest growin...
Three Result Areas <ul><li>Child welfare systems better meet the developmental needs of children 0-5, the fastest growing ...
“ Draft Handbook for NJ Child Protective Service Workers Regarding  Strengthening Families:  CSSP Webinar March 5, 2009”
What are the Protective Factors? <ul><li>Parental Resilience </li></ul><ul><li>Social Connections </li></ul><ul><li>Knowle...
<ul><li>Parental Resilience: </li></ul><ul><li>Resilience is the ability to “bounce back” when life becomes stressful.  Wh...
<ul><li>Social Connections: </li></ul><ul><li>Parents, like all of us, need to have a network of trusted friends and famil...
<ul><li>Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development: </li></ul><ul><li>Parents will look to you to help them understand d...
<ul><li>Concrete Support in Times of Need </li></ul><ul><li>No matter what life brings, every family occasionally needs he...
<ul><li>Social & Emotional Development of Children </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting children’s social and emotional skills hel...
Overarching Framework: 6 Protective Factors  DCFS is strengthening families and protecting children by building: 1. Parent...
IDCFS Protective Timeline Strengthening Families Integrated Assessment DCFS / POS Case Planning with Family Achieving Perm...
Strengthening Families Integrated Assessment DCFS / POS Case Planning with Family Achieving Permanency Strengthening Famil...
Failing to recognize the impact of trauma makes the problem worse… Trauma Informed Practice Initiative Lack of coordinatio...
Building   Protective   Factors   Supports Quality Practice and Helps Children Heal  … Parental Resilience Healthy Parent/...
<ul><li>Regional groups established – mechanism to facilitate training of entire work force (3600+, 130 Sessions, 35 Colla...
<ul><li>Integrated Assessment Template </li></ul><ul><li>Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths Assessment Tool (CANS) <...
<ul><li>Enroll and sustain the participation of eligible children and families involved with the child welfare system in H...
<ul><li>Love Is Not Enough Parent Cafes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regional SFI Parent Leadership Team  </li></ul></ul><ul><li>...
What has really worked for you (successes or what has resonated with staff) and what hasn't (pitfalls to avoid)?
In which aspects of training are you focusing and is there a difference in approach (i.e. Basic Orientation, AC training, ...
Thoughts on Structure Stand alone vs. embedding in current training? At what point do you introduce SF/PF to child welfare...
What do you find different about training child welfare staff on SF/PF versus training early childhood staff?
Have you created training curriculum and materials you are willing to share?
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  • Strengthening Families in Child Welfare Professional Development

    1. 1. Embedding Strengthening Families in Professional Development for Child Welfare Staff C E N T E R F O R T H E S T U D Y O F S O C I A L P O L I C Y
    2. 2. why is the Protective Factors Framework important to child welfare? <ul><li>Children zero to five are the fastest growing group entering the child welfare system. </li></ul><ul><li>Stability for children is largely promoted through stability of the families who care for them. </li></ul><ul><li>Optimal development of young children promotes lifelong improved outcomes and depends upon strong families. </li></ul><ul><li>Using a common framework among partners increases support to families when they need it. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Three Result Areas <ul><li>Child welfare systems better meet the developmental needs of children 0-5, the fastest growing cohort of children coming into the system nationwide </li></ul><ul><li>Child welfare systems support the development of protective factors among the families they serve (birth, foster, kinship, adoptive). </li></ul><ul><li>Child welfare systems help build a framework for community-based prevention activities </li></ul>
    4. 4. “ Draft Handbook for NJ Child Protective Service Workers Regarding Strengthening Families: CSSP Webinar March 5, 2009”
    5. 5. What are the Protective Factors? <ul><li>Parental Resilience </li></ul><ul><li>Social Connections </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development </li></ul><ul><li>Concrete Support in Times of Need </li></ul><ul><li>Social & Emotional Competence of Children </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Parental Resilience: </li></ul><ul><li>Resilience is the ability to “bounce back” when life becomes stressful. When parents feel stressed or frustrated, you have the opportunity to support and encourage parents. </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic </li></ul><ul><li>What might we do? </li></ul><ul><li>Ask, “What do you need?” “How can we help you?” </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with your supervisor and support staff to discuss how you might best support this family. </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Social Connections: </li></ul><ul><li>Parents, like all of us, need to have a network of trusted friends and family. You, as a child welfare worker, can be a source of support for your children and families. </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic </li></ul><ul><li>What might we do? </li></ul><ul><li>In order to help parents identify their informal support systems, ask who they would go to if they needed help or advice. </li></ul><ul><li>When appropriate, coordinate and facilitate a family-team meeting. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development: </li></ul><ul><li>Parents will look to you to help them understand developmental levels of children or what they should or shouldn’t be doing as parents. This is a great opportunity to offer guidance! </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic </li></ul><ul><li>What might we do? </li></ul><ul><li>In order to ensure that we all know what parents should or shouldn’t expect of their children, post a list – in the office – of the various stages of development for all age groups. </li></ul><ul><li>As a worker, give the parents you work with a handout explaining the stages of child development. </li></ul><ul><li>Help parents learn about their child – and especially take care to point out children’s achievements and positive traits. </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Concrete Support in Times of Need </li></ul><ul><li>No matter what life brings, every family occasionally needs help. Every day, you see parents who are in need of help and you are in a unique position to help those parents access the services they need. </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic </li></ul><ul><li>What might we do? </li></ul><ul><li>Ask families who they turn to for consistent support and how do those people </li></ul><ul><li>help them meet their needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Help them connect to the people, supports and services they need. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember that our goal is to help families become more resilient and independent. </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Social & Emotional Development of Children </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting children’s social and emotional skills helps the communication between parents and their children and can reduce tensions within the family. </li></ul><ul><li>What might we do? </li></ul><ul><li>When visiting with a child and the family, be sure to notice if there are any nurturing/supportive relationships in the home. If there are, it is important to note this strength to the parent/caregiver. If there are not, it is important to talk with the parent about how they might achieve or develop these kinds of relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Any time you visit with a child, it is important to talk with him or her about “feelings”. Children who learn the importance of feelings – theirs and others – learn the valuable trait of empathy. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Overarching Framework: 6 Protective Factors DCFS is strengthening families and protecting children by building: 1. Parental Resilience 2. Social Connections 3. Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development 4. Concrete Support in Times of Need 5. Social and Emotional Competence of Children 6. Healthy Parent-Child Relationships
    12. 12. IDCFS Protective Timeline Strengthening Families Integrated Assessment DCFS / POS Case Planning with Family Achieving Permanency Strengthening Families Child Protective Services Permanency
    13. 13. Strengthening Families Integrated Assessment DCFS / POS Case Planning with Family Achieving Permanency Strengthening Families Child Protective Services Intensity of services Service intensity within the “Protective Timeline” In Community In care In community
    14. 14. Failing to recognize the impact of trauma makes the problem worse… Trauma Informed Practice Initiative Lack of coordination Among child-serving Departments Failure to recognize strengths and protective capacity Symptoms misattributed to other disorders Lack of resources leaving problems unaddressed Separation from family, school, and community Unresolved or unaddressed caregiver trauma Child Trauma
    15. 15. Building Protective Factors Supports Quality Practice and Helps Children Heal … Parental Resilience Healthy Parent/Child Relationships Knowledge of Child Development Social/Emotional Competence of Children Social Connections Concrete Support in Times of Need Parental Resilience Healthy Parent/Child Relationships Knowledge of Child Development Knowledge of Child Development Knowledge of Child Development Concrete Support in Times of Need Coordinated efforts among child-serving departments Strengths & protective capacity recognized Symptoms recognized & diagnosed properly Identified resources to address problems Child connected with family, school, and community Caregiver trauma addressed & support plan developed Healthy Child / Healthy Family
    16. 16. <ul><li>Regional groups established – mechanism to facilitate training of entire work force (3600+, 130 Sessions, 35 Collaboratives + Affinity Groups) </li></ul><ul><li>Target Audience: Caseworkers, Supervisors, and Administrators from DCP, Foster Care, SOC, Residential IA, CAYIT, APT, Foster Care Therapists, and Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Phase I: Psychological First Aid (Fall) </li></ul><ul><li>Phase II: Trauma 201 (Winter) </li></ul><ul><li>Phase III: Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) Assessment Tool (Spring) </li></ul><ul><li>Phase IV: Strength-based Trauma-informed Service/Treatment Planning  (September, 2009) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Protective Factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent Leadership </li></ul></ul>Trauma Informed Learning Collaboratives
    17. 17. <ul><li>Integrated Assessment Template </li></ul><ul><li>Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths Assessment Tool (CANS) </li></ul><ul><li>Trauma 201 Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Parents Guide to Reunification </li></ul><ul><li>Reunification Worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation Training (To Come) </li></ul>Embedding Protective Factors Into Child Welfare Clinical Tools
    18. 18. <ul><li>Enroll and sustain the participation of eligible children and families involved with the child welfare system in Head Start programs </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage and enhance collaboration between DCFS/POS agencies and Head Start Programs to improve service delivery to target families </li></ul><ul><li>Head Start programs play a conscious and active role in preventing child abuse and neglect and ensuring the safety of children participating in programs </li></ul><ul><li>Cross-Training: all DCFS and POS caseworkers and supervisors and all Head Start program staff have the information they need to fully collaborate with each other to benefit child-welfare involved children and their families. </li></ul>Head Start Collaborative Agreements
    19. 19. <ul><li>Love Is Not Enough Parent Cafes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regional SFI Parent Leadership Team </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Presentations and Materials at DCFS Meetings, Conference, and Events </li></ul><ul><li>Staff Internal / Cross-Division Workgroup (ELFS) </li></ul><ul><li>6 early childhood learning networks (one in each DCFS region) linking with child welfare at community level </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration with: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Family Advocacy Centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teen Parent Services Network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Foster Parent Advisory Council </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Youth Advisory Board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kids Hope United and other POS Agencies </li></ul></ul>Strengthening Families Illinois
    20. 20. What has really worked for you (successes or what has resonated with staff) and what hasn't (pitfalls to avoid)?
    21. 21. In which aspects of training are you focusing and is there a difference in approach (i.e. Basic Orientation, AC training, FCS, IIS, foster parent, clinical supervision, etc.)
    22. 22. Thoughts on Structure Stand alone vs. embedding in current training? At what point do you introduce SF/PF to child welfare staff, how, and why?  Do you embed it at different training levels, (i.e. step it up), and if so how and when? How do you engage supervisory/administrative support and buy in? How do you continue to reinforce on an ongoing basis?
    23. 23. What do you find different about training child welfare staff on SF/PF versus training early childhood staff?
    24. 24. Have you created training curriculum and materials you are willing to share?

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