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Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO) (May 2011)
 

Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO) (May 2011)

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**Download the report for fully functioning links.**...

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The fear that you’re missing out—that your peers are doing, in the know about or in possession of more or something better than you—may be a social angst that’s always existed, but it’s going into overdrive thanks to real-time digital updates and to our constant companion, the smartphone.

This presentation is a companion to our trend report that explores the FOMO phenomenon, identifying which cohort is most prone to FOMO and how they respond to it, spotlighting how FOMO is manifesting in the zeitgeist, and looking at the wide-ranging potential for brands seeking to tap into FOMO.

In addition to desk research, we interviewed experts and influencers in technology and academia, and conducted a quantitative survey in the U.S. and the U.K. The survey used SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online tool, to poll 1,024 adults aged 18-plus and 87 teens aged 13-17 from March 4-15, 2011.

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18 of 8 previous next Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Right structure very usefull
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  • Thanks for your comment, OpenEqualFree. You’re absolutely right. We actually note that younger people are simply more prone to FOMO due to their life stage. See page 10 of the full report for the full explanation. You can download it here: http://www.jwtintelligence.com/trendletters2/
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  • Using age as an indicator for social media use is misleading. It could very easily be argued (and observed in any middle school in America) that younger people are simply more prone to FOMO. You could just as easily make charts showing that social media use lowers the risk of cancer, impotency, hair loss, and heart attacks...
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  • To download the full report, you can find it here on our site: http://www.jwtintelligence.com/trendletters2/
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    Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO) (May 2011) Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO) (May 2011) Presentation Transcript

    • FEAR OF MISSING OUT MAY 2011
    • WHAT WE‟LL COVERBackground and MethodologyFear Of Missing Out (FOMO) • Trend • Drivers • Who‟s Afraid of Missing Out? • Manifestations • Significance/Relevance • PotentialFOMOs to WatchAppendix • Learn More About Our Experts and Influencers FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • METHODOLOGY Our trend reports are the result of quantitative, qualitative and desk research conducted by JWTIntelligence throughout the year. Specifically for this report, we conducted a quantitative study in the U.S. and the U.K. using SONAR™, JWT‟s proprietary online tool, from March 4-15, 2011. We surveyed 590 Americans and 434 Britons aged 18-plus (data are weighted by age and gender); we also polled 87 teens aged 13-17 residing in the homes of adults surveyed.* In addition, we interviewed experts and influencers in technology and academia.*All teen data shown combines U.S. and U.K. respondents; splitting the data by country would render unreliable base sizes. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • TRENDFear Of Missing Out (FOMO) is the uneasy andsometimes all-consuming feeling that you‟remissing out—that your peers are doing, in theknow about or in possession of more or somethingbetter than you. FOMO may be a social angstthat‟s always existed, but it‟s going into overdrivethanks to real-time digital updates and to ourconstant companion, the smartphone. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • TREND (cont‟d.)Once social media makes people aware of things to which they otherwise might neverhave been privy, it can spark a sense of vicarious participation or motivate real-worldbehavior. Conversely, it can be a curse, fostering anxiety and feelings of inadequacy. “FOMO is the sometimes energizing, sometimes terrifying anxiety that you are missing out on something absolutely terrific. It could be a TV show, it could be a party, it could be a gadget, it could be that really good burrito from the food cart. The important thing to keep in mind with FOMO is that it‟s not just a state of mind; it is also a physical reaction. So as a FOMO sufferer, I can report sweating, itching, pacing and compulsive refreshing of my Twitter feed.” —BIANCA BOSKER, senior technology editor at The Huffington Post FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • TREND (cont‟d.)The acronym is infiltrating vocabularies as more than just an amusing expression.FOMO encapsulates an increasingly pronounced phenomenon in the age of socialmedia—an ageless concept that‟s reaching a tipping point. With 600 million-plusactive users on Facebook, not to mention Twitter and other social platforms, today‟sunprecedented awareness of how others are living their lives will only heighten,ultimately leaving people predisposed to FOMO.While the fear of missing out has always been essential for marketers to understand,it‟s growing more significant for brands, since today‟s intensified FOMO drivesbehaviors on social media sites and, subsequently, real-world consumer actions andself-perceptions. “FOMO is a great motivator of human behavior, and I think a crucial key to understanding social software, and why it works the way it does.” —Hunch and Flickr co-founder CATERINA FAKE, “FOMO and Social Media,” Caterina.net, March 15, 2011 FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS• Radical Transparency meets Life in Real Time• Digital natives• Social one-upmanship• Hashtag-friendly events• Social media feeding into relative deprivation• Life in overdrive: too much to do, read, buy, watch, etc. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS (cont‟d.)• Radical Transparency meets Life in Real Time• Digital natives• Social one-upmanship• Hashtag-friendly events• Social media feeding into relative deprivation• Life in overdrive: too much to do, read, buy, watch, etc. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS (cont‟d.)• Radical Transparency meets Life in Real Time• Digital natives• Social one-upmanship• Hashtag-friendly events• Social media feeding into relative deprivation• Life in overdrive: too much to do, read, buy, watch, etc. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS (cont‟d.)• Radical Transparency meets Social media brings us closer to other echelons Life in Real Time yet simultaneously back down to reality.• Digital natives “Those who used to dine behind thick stone walls and had caviar• Social one-upmanship now do so, Tweet about it and can• Hashtag-friendly events be seen by those sitting down to dinner at Chipotle.”—MARC A. SMITH,• Social media feeding into sociologist and chief social scientist at relative deprivation Connected Action Consulting Group• Life in overdrive: too much to do, read, buy, watch, etc. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS (cont‟d.)• Radical Transparency meets Life in Real Time• Digital natives• Social one-upmanship• Hashtag-friendly events• Social media feeding into relative deprivation “A friend who works in advertising told me that she• Life in overdrive: too much felt fine about her life—until she opened Facebook. to do, read, buy, watch, „Then I‟m thinking, I am 28, with three roommates, etc. and oh, it looks like you have a precious baby and a mortgage,‟ she said. „And then I wanna die.‟” —JENNA WORTHAM, “Feel Like a Wallflower? Maybe It‟s Your Facebook Wall,” The New York Times, April 9, 2011 FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • DRIVERS (cont‟d.)• Radical Transparency meets Life in Real Time• Digital natives• Social one-upmanship• Hashtag-friendly events• Social media feeding into relative deprivation• Life in overdrive: too much to do, read, buy, watch, etc. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • WHO’S AFRAID OFMISSING OUT?
    • THE YOUNG AND THE FEARFULIt‟s no surprise that Millennials, a generation shaped by online tools and social media,are most closely linked with FOMO—they‟re the most exposed to what their networkof peers is doing. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • THE YOUNG AND THE FEARFUL (cont‟d.) FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • THE YOUNG AND THE FEARFUL (cont‟d.) FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • THE YOUNG AND THE FEARFUL (cont‟d.) Millennials‟ link to FOMO is in part a function of their age and life stage: • This is a more narcissistic time that‟s focused on defining identity and exploring others‟. • Millennials tend to look to others to influence their opinions and decisions. • This generation in particular belongs to expansive networks that include both real- and virtual-world friends, both of which they solicit for advice.Image credit: Christine Miranda FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • THE YOUNG AND THE FEARFUL (cont‟d.) “Younger people are more engaged in identity formation than older people. They may be more open to the experience of FOMO because they are engaged in relative deprivation. Younger people have fewer resources to consume identity-forming products and experiences while simultaneously having the most time and desire for them.” —MARC A. SMITH, sociologist and chief social scientist at Connected Action Consulting GroupImage credit: @MSG FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MAN‟S BEST FRENEMY? Overall, our male respondents were more prone than female respondents to feelings of missing out via social media. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MAN‟S BEST FRENEMY? (cont‟d.)This male skew toward FOMO is most pronounced in the U.S. More American men thanwomen could relate to FOMO—51% vs. 40%. And as with Millennials, more FOMOcorrelates with more Facebook activity. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: GROWING MEDIA BUZZImage credit: Cosmopolitan in Australia FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: SMIRNOFF, “BE THERE” “If you weren‟t at one of Smirnoff‟s ravishing Nightlife Exchange Project parties, then where the bloody hell were you?” —MICHELLE WILDING, “Smirnoff Nightlight Exchange Party, Bangalore,” Lost at E Minor Blog, December 8, 2010Image credits: Smirnoff, www.facebook.com/smirnoffus FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: APPLE, FACETIMEImage credit: srca2009 FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: CITYSEARCH AUSTRALIA, “FOMO”Image credit: Citysearch Australia FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • ROAD SAFETY COUNCIL OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA, MANIFESTATIONS: “ENJOY THE RIDE”Image credit: EnjoyTheRideWA FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • FOMO IN ENTERTAINMENT: MANIFESTATIONS: HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER, “THE CURSE OF THE BLITZ”Image credit: CBS FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • FOMO IN ENTERTAINMENT: MANIFESTATIONS: PORTLANDIA, “DID YOU READ?”Image credit: ifc FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: DIGITAL RUDENESSImage credit: My Phone Is Off For You FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: FACEBOOK GROUPSImage credits: FOMO, Fomo Connect, FOMO disorder (fear of missing out disorder), Victims ofFOMO, FOMO: its why you are in this group FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • MANIFESTATIONS: FOMO OP Young people are teasingly reminding absent friends that they‟re missing out on something by posting photos in which they spell out “FOMO” with their arms. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • SIGNIFICANCE/RELEVANCEAs adoption of social media, location-based toolsand mobile devices continues to surge, so too willFOMO, as well as FOMO-awareness. For brands, thishas powerful potential. FOMO has the potential todrive spending, since it heightens participation onsocial media platforms and motivates consumers todo more.On social media, FOMO helps fuel a craving to notonly become part of the conversation online andnot miss a moment of it but to do things that willinduce FOMO in others and, of course, spread theword about them. This in turn drives consumerawareness and inclination to buy in. FOMO about aconcert? “I‟ll buy that overpriced ticket onStubHub.” FOMO about the latest designer jacketpopping up in everyone‟s photos? “I can‟t afford it,but I‟ll search out a good knockoff.” FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • SIGNIFICANCE/RELEVANCE (cont‟d.)Conversely, FOMO can be quite paralyzing—people can become caught up in theirfears, unable to decide just what they should be doing at any given moment. AndFOMO sufferers are often so distracted from the here and now that they fail tofully experience the moment and appreciate whatever it offers. “The fear of missing out might become a self-fulfilling prophecy. The futile attempt to exhaust all available options can lead us to not realizing any option at all and to missing all options altogether.” —DAN HERMAN, CEO of international strategy consulting firm Competitive AdvantagesTeens and young adults are most susceptible to and cognizant of FOMO, but they‟renot necessarily trying to mitigate it. They will be particularly receptive to messagingand strategies that tap into FOMO and will welcome solutions, even when they didn‟tknow they needed them. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • POTENTIALBrands have many opportunities to fine-tune messaging, offers, contests and moreto tap into fears of missing out. Although there‟s no cure for the common FOMO,brands can focus on easing it, escalating it, making light of it or even turning it intoa positive.One tactic for marketers is to help ease anxiety around FOMO. Brands can assurethe afflicted that they‟re not missing out on much after all; those offering simplepleasures, for example, can convey that stepping back from the fray rather thanfollowing the crowd can be a smarter choice. Another tactic is to explain that thebrand‟s offering is just as fabulous as whatever‟s inducing FOMO, pointing out howand why it delivers the same or similar satisfactions. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • POTENTIAL (cont‟d.)Alternatively, a brand might offer tools for avoiding FOMO to consumers who act ontheir feelings rather than festering in them. Going to the hottest restaurant intown and afraid of missing out on the menu‟s best options? An app like Foodspottingprovides tips and recommendations from other diners. (Indeed, real-time tools cancreate FOMO, but they can also help people circumvent it.)Or brands can address FOMO woes by encouraging people to join in on the thingsthat make them feel left out or showing consumers how to get a taste of whatthey‟re missing (e.g., with more affordable or more convenient choices). “We‟ve always had this fear of missing out, but what‟s different is that now these tools give us a sense that we can actually dosomething about it and catch what‟s going on in real time so that we don‟t miss out on it.” —BIANCA BOSKER, senior technology editor at The Huffington Post FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • POTENTIAL (cont‟d.)Brands can also offer exclusive, unique or over-the-top experiences likely to inspireFOMO in nonparticipants. Or messaging can escalate FOMO in order to motivatedesired actions. Millennials especially tend to share openly and likewise hear whateveryone else is up to, no matter how FOMO-inducing. Brands can facilitate this byproviding platforms for showing and telling.Brands can tap into the rising importance of the social currency that experiencesprovide people: contextual advertising on social networks (since consumers aremotivated to “get in on the action” after reading about friends‟ activities);incentives for name-dropping in photo tags, check-ins and the like throughprograms like Facebook‟s Sponsored Stories; or simply making direct connectionsbetween the brand‟s offering and its potential cachet on social media. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • POTENTIAL (cont‟d.)Note that when tapping into FOMO, marketers must retain some sensitivity—thisstate of mind can be a sore spot for many consumers. So while FOMO has greatpotency as a marketing tool, it also has the potential to twist the knife for thoseespecially sensitive to it. The appropriate tone will depend greatly on the audienceand the category. FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • FOMOS TOWATCH
    • FOMO TO WATCH: MINDY KALING‟S IS EVERYONE HANGING OUT WITHOUT ME? The recently released cover of this book of humorous essays, to be published in November, is evocative of FOMO to a tee. Feeling like a wallflower and wondering what others are doing? FOMO at its best. The marketing effort is tapping into the growing meme. Kaling, who has written for and appears in the U.S. version of The Office, tweeted that New York Magazine‟s Vulture blog finds the cover “zeitgeisty”—and that it is.Image credit: @mindykaling FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • FOMO TO WATCH: THENEWNO2‟S THE FEAR OF MISSING OUT The L.A.-based alternative rock band from England is working on their sophomore album, to be titled The Fear of Missing Out. In April, Thewnewno2 singer and lead guitarist Dhani Harrison (son of The Beatles‟ George Harrison) explained the album name to Esquire: “Everything in life boils down to FOMO. It‟s what makes you go to a party when youre tired. Its behind broken relationships. And war. And I have FOMO about music. I like so many disparate types of music, so by understanding FOMO I can bring whoever I want to an album. Why not put it all together and see what happens?”Image credit: www.esquire.com FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • FOMO TO WATCH: LIAM FINN‟S FOMO The second solo album from this New Zealand musician (son of Crowded House‟s Neil Finn) is due out in June. It‟s titled FOMO because the artist has said Fear Of Missing Out is at the heart of the record— which he made while out of the spotlight, in a New Zealand beach cottage—and his life, since his musician friends and family are accustomed to catching up with each other by phone, email and Facebook photos while touring. He says of FOMO: “It‟s a very natural way to be, but it‟s also a slightly tragic term, because you should never wish you were somewhere else.”Image credit: www.yeproc.com FEAR OF MISSING OUT
    • APPENDIX
    • LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR EXPERTS & INFLUENCERS
    • BIANCA BOSKER, senior technology editor at The Huffington Post APPENDIX: LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR EXPERTS AND INFLUENCERS
    • DAN HERMAN, CEO of international strategy consulting firm Competitive Advantages APPENDIX: LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR EXPERTS AND INFLUENCERS
    • MARC A. SMITH, sociologist and chief social scientist at Connected Action Consulting Group APPENDIX: LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR EXPERTS AND INFLUENCERS
    • THANK YOUAnn M. Mack Christine MirandaDirector of Trendspotting Trends StrategistJWT Worldwide JWTIntelligenceann.mack@jwt.com christine.miranda@jwt.com@annmmack @xtinemiranda WWW.JWT.COM | WWW.JWTINTELLIGENCE.COM | WWW.ANXIETYINDEX.COM © 2011 J. Walter Thompson Company. All Rights Reserved.