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Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
Genre Theory
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Genre Theory

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  • 1. “Genres are created through a process of repetition andrecognition leading to anticipation and expectation.”Graham Burton (2000)GENRE THEORY
  • 2. Genre & Expectation• As genres become establishedaudiences begin to havecertain expectations• Every genre containsgeneric conventions thataudiences would expect andgain gratification from• ‘Sin City’, ‘Fish Tank’ &‘District 9’ rely upon differingconventions relating to theirspecific genre
  • 3. Why do We Like Genre?Genre texts are successful because AUDIENCES like their…- Familiarity (like a warm blanket!)- They give us an informed choicePRODUCERS of media texts likethem as they..- Give them a blueprint or toolbox to use and experiment with- They have a proven popularity - so they can (almost always)guarantee some success- They can target their audience more easily - marketing campaignsetc…
  • 4. How Genres ChangeAll genre texts combine…• “The familiar and theunexpected” (G.Burton 2000)• The “same but different”(Nick Lacey 1999)
  • 5. How Genres Change• Repetition of the conventions could lead toboredom. To keep us interested producersoffer us what we know with a twistThis can be …- Hybridity- New Techniques- Modern Social Issues- Different characters
  • 6. GENRE• Hybridity/Hybrid: The fusion or combination ofdifferent genre styles• Repetition and Difference: Most media textshave a pattern of repetition and difference. Theyhave identifiable similarities, but also containnew elements or similar elements used in newways.
  • 7. Steve Neale‘Genres are instances of repetition anddifference’. He adds that difference isabsolutely essential to the economy of genre’ :mere repetition would not attract an audience.
  • 8. What do genres mean for audiences?Audiences...- can select texts based on their genre.-have expectations about a text based on its genre, allowing them todraw pleasures from its conventions, such as repeated narratives.However, pleasure can also be drawn from differences- identify with repeated elements in generic texts and may shapetheir own identity in response.
  • 9. What do genres mean for producers?Producers…- market texts according to genre because an audience of fans ofthat genre has already been established.- standardise production practices according to genre conventions.- subscribe to established conventions but also allow creativity withina given format to keep the genre fresh/modern.
  • 10. GENRE CONCLUSIONS• Genres have a certain amount of predictability and repeatedelements, which make them distinctive and which help todefine them.• All genres have a portfolio of key elements (conventions)from which they are composed.• Not all examples of a genre will have all the elements all thetime.• It is these elements which make up the formula or arepetition of elements of a given genre.• Genres can be combined to create new forms or Hybrids

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