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CEL 2012 Slideshow
 

CEL 2012 Slideshow

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    CEL 2012 Slideshow CEL 2012 Slideshow Presentation Transcript

    • The Composition of Everyday Life
    • The Composition of Everyday Life a Toledo-centric book
    • The Practice of Everyday Life (1980)Michel de Certeau (1925-1986)French Jesuit scholar•examines the practice of everyday life•the way people individualize and appropriate massculture•examines the productive and consumptive activityinherent in everyday life•“strategies”(producers, institutions, government, corporations) and“tactics” (consumers, people, shortcuts, appropriators)•a key text in the study of everyday life
    • For instance, the ambiguity that subverted from within the Spanish colonizers’“success” in imposing their own culture on the indigenous Indians is well known.Submissive, and even consenting to their subjection, the Indians nevertheless oftenmade of the rituals, representations, and laws imposed on them something quitedifferent from what their conquerors had in mind; they subverted them not byrejecting or altering them, but by using them with respect to ends and referencesforeign to the system they had no choice but to accept. They were other within thevery colonization that outwardly assimilated them; their use of the dominant socialorder deflected its power, which they lacked the means to challenge; they escapedwithout leaving it. The strength of their difference lay in the procedures of“consumption.” To a lesser degree, a similar ambiguity creeps into our societiesthrough the use made by the “common people” of the culture disseminated andimposed by the “elites” producing the language.The presence and circulation of a representation (taught by preachers, educators, andpopularizers as the key to socioeconomic advancement) tells us nothing about what itis for its users. We must first analyze its manipulation by users who are not its makers.Only then can we gauge the difference or similarity between the production of theimage and the secondary production hidden in the process of its utilization.
    • The Five Canons (Parts)of Ancient RhetoricInventionArrangementStyleMemoryDelivery
    • INVENTION•exploring, discovering, and developingideas•complicating your thinking•exploring into the complexities of an idea
    • Invention StrategiesAsking (and answering) questionsDialogue •External •InternalReadingResearchWatching YouTube/TVRunning/Dog walking/Fly fishingPartying The Spirit of Invention: You can ask and answer questions (watch TV, etc) in the spirit of invention (to explore, discover, and develop ideas; to complicate your thinking; to explore into the complexity of ideas), or not.Brainstorming, freewriting, outlining, clustering ….Writing a draftRevisionListening/Taking Notes in Class/Becoming Curious, Skeptical, Informed
    • Invention as—•a process (not just a step)Some students can brainstorm up a lot of ideas; some can’t. For some, freewritingcreates insightful ideas; for most it really doesn’t. The students who brainstorm orfreewrite into an insightful essay are already inventors (to some degree) and canbecome better inventors (as can we all). Students need more help than justbrainstorming, freewriting, clustering, outlining (although those these strategiesaren’t useless).•a way of thinking (not just a homework assignment)Nearly all students will resist inventing. They have been conditioned to just write.What they submit—even if written well—is a rough draft that has been possiblyrevised once (possibly not) and proofread. The student thinks this is writing. Whenasked to invent first (to explore, discover, and develop ideas; to complicate one’sthinking before writing or even drafting an essay), most (nearly all) students will notgrasp this concept (many faculty and administration have the same puzzledreaction).
    • It takes awhile for students to understand the concept ofInvention: Students will focus on format and school/busywork: •What format should my invention writing be in? •How long should it be? How many points is it worth? Students won’t write in the spirit of invention. They won’t connect the invention work to the essay. Students will invent, but be unable to see the fruit of their invention writing, the germs of interesting ideas. Students will identify the most obvious ideas as interesting and overlook the more interesting/less obvious/insightful ideas. (Paul Roberts, “How to Say Nothing in 500 Words.”)These, I argue, are all reasons why it’s important to teachinvention.
    • Invention in the college writing class—I help students learn to invent.I act as an invention partner.I model invention.
    • This helps students redefine whatwriting is or can be.It’s not just a way to express or communicatewhat you think or know.Writing is a way to explore, figureout, discover, and create what you think orknow—or what can be known.You also write to plan, to ask questions, toreflect.
    • A student said—
    • The United States went to war inIraq because the American peoplewanted to.
    • The United States went to war inIraq because the American peoplewanted to.Okay, but—Why did the American people wantto go to war? Why would a bunchof people from Brimfield Townshipwant to go to war in Iraq?
    • The United States Why did the American peoplewent to war in Iraq want to go to war?because the Okay, butAmerican people Why would a bunch of peoplewanted to. from Brimfield Township want to go to war in Iraq? What do they know—or think they know—about Iraq? Why? How? Really? I want to at least give students the opportunity to cross this line.
    • OR, to see the line. To see that thereThe United States is a line that can be crossed.went to war in Iraq They might not live on the otherbecause the Okay, but side of the line. They might notAmerican people move in permanently right away.wanted to. They might hate me for showing them the line. But I think if we ask humans to write more than a sentence, we have to then ask ourselves: What does that writing say? Is this a mind at work? What is writing? What is the purpose and value of this writing? Do I feel comfortable I want to at least give students the rewarding anti-writing (writing that opportunity to cross this line is correct in form yet void of thought)?
    • Writing PedagogiesCurrent-Traditional RhetoricExpressivistProcessRhetoricalCollaborativeCultural StudiesCriticalFeministCommunity ServiceWACWriting CenterBasic WritingTechnologyInvention--from A GUIDE TO COMPOSITION PEDAGOGIES (Gary Tateand Amy Rupiper)
    • •We are all multi-pedagogical.•What is your pedagogy?•I’m a critical, rhetorical, and invention pedagog.•What message does your pedagogy sendstudents about writing? about thinking? abouteducation? about life?
    • Current-Traditional Rhetoric (CTR)•developed in the late 19th century•basic theme writing (5-paragraph essay)•priveleges arrangement and style(form over content/ideas)•replaced by other pedagogies(expressive, process, etc), but still kicking•teaches basic structure/organization but— •is ultimately limiting •once students learn it, many cling to it •essays are dull and formulaic •writers don’t explore complexity •obvious claim and three obvious reasons why •is a performance of basic writing •is Jasper Neel’s anti-writing (structurally sound and content free)•defines what writing is for the student
    • Thesis: People should learn American Sign Language.Focus (?): Certain people should learn American SignLanguage. •Firefighters should learn American Sign Language. •Police should learn American Sign Language. •Doctors should learn American Sign Language.
    • CEL is a response to CTR and otherpedagogies that neglect invention.CEL helps to revitalize INVENTIONin the teaching/learning of writing.
    • Critical PedagogyCritical pedagog Ira Shor defines critical pedagogy as: "Habits of thought, reading, writing, and speaking which go beneath surface meaning, first impressions, dominant myths, official pronouncements, traditional clichés, received wisdom, and mere opinions, to understand the deep meaning, root causes, social context, ideology, and personal consequences of any action, event, object, process, organization, experience, text, subject matter, policy, mass media, or discourse." (Empowering Education, 129)
    • Rhetorical PedagogyAs a rhetorical pedagog, I teacheverything as a rhetorical situation.•You get pulled over by the police.What is that? A rhetorical situation.•You have to write an essay for a class.What is that? A rhetorical situation.•You want to submit your essay late, and the syllabusstates, “No late essays.”What is that? A rhetorical situation.•You’re deciding whether or not to attend college.What is that? A rhetorical situation.
    • A rhetorical situation isan opportunity to communicate an idea.Rhetoric•the way you communicate an idea•the way you persuade others to think and actdifferently•the way you come to think what you think
    • A rhetorical situation consists of—•writer/speaker/communicator•audience•subject/purpose•method of communication•rules/expectations for that method•exigence
    • I tell my students they are writingfor an academic audience.The academic audience is— •informed •skeptical •curiousThey should makewriting/rhetorical decisions basedon this audience.
    • Student Writing•Old Way•New
    • Old Writing Process:1) Assignment 2) Essay Make rhetorical decisions based on the rhetorical situation.New/Revised Process:Inserts intellectual space.1) Assignment 2) Invention ?) Essay
    • Old Writing Process:1) Assignment 2) EssayNew/Revised Process:Inserts intellectual space.2) Assignment 2) Invention 3) Claims & Support Thesis Support •Focused •Responsive •Insightful •ArguableInvention Questions in Analysis and Public Resonance Sections of CEL (and other sections):What is the particular point of crisis?How has the situation come about, and why does it continue?What are the effects of the situation?Why do I have an opinion on this topic?Why is this belief valuable?Who might care about this issue? Why? Who should care about this issue? Why?How are my readers involved in this issue? How could they be more involved?What group of people might understand or sympathize with the situation?Is this issue an example of some trend?Why is it important that others hear my opinion about this issue?What else has been said about this issue, and how are my ideas different?
    • Old Writing Process:1) Assignment 2) EssayNew/Revised Process:Inserts intellectual space.2) Assignment 2) Invention 3) Claims & Support Thesis Support •Focused •Helps the reader •Responsive understand and •Insightful accept the thesis. •ArguableMake writing/rhetoricaldecisions based onthe rhetorical situation.Don’t just answer Invention questions in your essay. Use Invention questions to explore, discover, and develop ideas; to complicate your thinking; to explore into the complexities of an idea. Then use ideas from invention to create a focused, insightful, responsive thesis and support that helps the reader understand and accept the thesis, etc.
    • Writing Task/Assignment/Rhetorical SituationInvent Explain how youClaims & have developed as aSupport writer and thinker in this class.Make Rhetorical Decisions Based on theRhetorical Situation (A Mind at Work) •Purpose/Topic •Writer •Audience •Method of Communication •Rules/Expectations for Method CEL is a toolbox of rhetorical toolsAcademic Audience: Curious, Informed, SkepticalSupport Strategies (from 243 in CEL) •Rhetorical Decision: Does the support help the reader understand and accept the thesis?Arrangement: Order/Cycle of Development (Blending in Source Info, 480 in CEL)Concise WritingMLAEssay/Text
    • Writing Task/Assignment/Rhetorical SituationInvent Research Explain how youClaims & have developed as aSupport writer and thinker in this class.Make Rhetorical Decisions Based on theRhetorical Situation (A Mind at Work) •Purpose/Topic •Writer •Audience •Method of Communication •Rules/Expectations for Method CEL is a toolbox of rhetorical toolsAcademic Audience: Curious, Informed, SkepticalSupport Strategies (from 243 in CEL) •Rhetorical Decision: Does the support help the reader understand and accept the thesis? ResearchArrangement: Order/Cycle of Development (Blending in Source Info, 480 in CEL)Concise WritingMLAEssay/Text
    • Writing Task/Assignment/Rhetorical SituationInvent Research Explain how you InventionClaims &Support have developed as a Revision writer and thinker in Writing this class.Make Rhetorical Decisions Based on the ResearchRhetorical Situation (A Mind at Work) Invention •Purpose/Topic Revision •Writer Writing •Audience Research •Method of Communication •Rules/Expectations for Method Invention RevisionAcademic Audience: Curious, Informed, Skeptical Writing ResearchSupport Strategies (from 243 in CEL) •Rhetorical Decision: Does the support help the reader Invention understand and accept the thesis? Revision WritingArrangement: Order/Cycle of Development (Blending in Source Info, 480 in CEL) ResearchConcise Writing Invention RevisionMLA WritingEssay/Text
    • CEL is a rhetorical toolbox. It provides students with rhetorical tools.
    • I want students to—•recognize rhetorical situations•analyze (size up, think about) rhetoricalsituations•make rhetorical decisions•enter and participate in rhetoricalsituations•contribute to ongoing discussions in theworld of ideas
    • I want students to—•develop rhetorical and intellectual agility (the ability to move from one rhetorical situation to another— to recognize, analyze, and effectively enter and contribute to rhetorical situations).
    • Invention PedagogyStudents resist invention.Is this a reason to not teach it?Or is this a reason to teach it?Students have not been asked to invent, shownhow to invent, allowed or encouraged to invent.Many see themselves as customers (purchasingpremade and packaged ideas as education)instead of as students (creating their own ideasfrom ingredients, pieces, and raw material).Teaching invention is hard, often frustrating, andimportant work.
    • We all have different pedagogies.Contrary to popular opinion, this ishow students learn to write.
    • I tell my students that I’m notteaching them how to write, that inthis class they are not simplylearning how to write. I say that inthis class they are developing aswriters and thinkers.
    • Our final, reflective writingassignment is—To explain how you havedeveloped as a writer and a thinkerin this class.
    • Old Writing Process:1) Assignment 2) EssayNew/Revised Process:Inserts intellectual space.2) Assignment 2) Invention 3) Claims & Thesis Support•How has your understanding of yourself as a writer changed since you wrote your original description at thebeginning of the term? What reasons would you give for your new understanding?•What have been your most and least successful writing experiences in this course, and why? How have theseexperiences been similar to or different from your previous writing experiences.•What new ideas or strategies have you learned about writing, and how will you use these new ideas or strategies infuture writing (and thinking) tasks—in college and outside of college? Explain why these ideas and writing strategiesare important.•How has your understanding of the relationship between writing and thinking changed since you wrote youroriginal description? How do you see writing differently? How do you see thinking differently? How do you write orthink differently?•What writing strategies or ideas from this course have you used effectively in other courses this term?•How have you developed as a writer and thinker, and how will you build on your current development from here.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing. Our final, reflective writing assignment is— To explain how you have developed as a writer and a thinker in this class.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.
    • Goals and Objectives•To learn how to recognize and strategically use the conventions of academic literacy: control formal features of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling; develop knowledge of genre conventions, ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics; demonstrate appropriate means of documenting work; learn common formats for different contexts.•To understand and use rhetorical principles to produce public and private documents appropriate for academic andprofessional audiences and purposes: focus on a purpose; respond to the needs of different audiences; respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations; use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation; adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality; use various technological tools to explore texts.•To practice good writing, including planning, revising, editing, evaluating sources, and working with others: develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading; use writing as an open process that permits writers to revise their work; learn to critique their own and others’ works; learn the advantages and responsibilities of writing as a collaborative act.•To practice the processes of good reading: experience and use the many layers of meaning implicit in “texts”; interact with a text to question the ideas it presents and the language it uses; read and respond to written and visual texts; learn to proofread and edit documents for academic and professional audiences.•To learn Web and digital environments valued by the university, for example, some or all of the following: Use the Internet as a research tool; Use word processing; Back-up files on disks, CDs, or jump drives; Send and receive e-mail; Enter discussion in chat rooms; Access Web CT or Vista.•To learn and practice how writing at the university is often based on previous research and inquiry and how to use thisresearch in writing: Use writing for inquiry, rather than merely reporting; Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources to support one’s own stance.
    • Goals and Objectives•To learn how to recognize and strategically use the conventions of academic literacy: control formal features of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling; develop knowledge of genre conventions, ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics; demonstrate appropriate means of documenting work; learn common formats for different contexts.•To understand and use rhetorical principles to produce public and private documents appropriate for academic andprofessional audiences and purposes: focus on a purpose; respond to the needs of different audiences; respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations; use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation; adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality; use various technological tools to explore texts.•To practice good writing, including planning, revising, editing, evaluating sources, and working with others: develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading; use writing as an open process that permits writers to revise their work; learn to critique their own and others’ works; learn the advantages and responsibilities of writing as a collaborative act.•To practice the processes of good reading: experience and use the many layers of meaning implicit in “texts”; interact with a text to question the ideas it presents and the language it uses; read and respond to written and visual texts; learn to proofread and edit documents for academic and professional audiences.•To learn Web and digital environments valued by the university, for example, some or all of the following: Use the Internet as a research tool; Use word processing; Back-up files on disks, CDs, or jump drives; Send and receive e-mail; Enter discussion in chat rooms; Access Web CT or Vista.•To learn and practice how writing at the university is often based on previous research and inquiry and how to use thisresearch in writing: Use writing for inquiry, rather than merely reporting; Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources to support one’s own stance.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.Writing is a complex literacy task that consists of othercomplex literacy tasks.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.Writing is a complex literacy task that consists of othercomplex literacy tasks. •Reading •Listening •Research •Revision •Grammar •Speaking •Thinking
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.Writing is a complex literacy task that consists of othercomplex literacy tasks.Writing is very connected to reading, thinking, attitude, life.
    • Consumerism Text messaging Parking/driving Work/School/Family NCLB Processed FoodStudent/Customer Service
    • Goals and Objectives•To learn how to recognize and strategically use the conventions of academic literacy: control formal features of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling; develop knowledge of genre conventions, ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics; demonstrate appropriate means of documenting work; learn common formats for different contexts.•To understand and use rhetorical principles to produce public and private documents appropriate for academic andprofessional audiences and purposes: focus on a purpose; respond to the needs of different audiences; respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations; use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation; adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality; use various technological tools to explore texts.•To practice good writing, including planning, revising, editing, evaluating sources, and working with others: develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading; use writing as an open process that permits writers to revise their work; learn to critique their own and others’ works; learn the advantages and responsibilities of writing as a collaborative act.•To practice the processes of good reading: experience and use the many layers of meaning implicit in “texts”; interact with a text to question the ideas it presents and the language it uses; read and respond to written and visual texts; learn to proofread and edit documents for academic and professional audiences.•To learn Web and digital environments valued by the university, for example, some or all of the following: Use the Internet as a research tool; Use word processing; Back-up files on disks, CDs, or jump drives; Send and receive e-mail; Enter discussion in chat rooms; Access Web CT or Vista.•To learn and practice how writing at the university is often based on previous research and inquiry and how to use thisresearch in writing: Use writing for inquiry, rather than merely reporting; Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources to support one’s own stance.
    • Goals and Objectives•To learn how to recognize and strategically use the conventions of academic literacy: control formal features of syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling; develop knowledge of genre conventions, ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics; demonstrate appropriate means of documenting work; Consumerism learn common formats for different contexts.•To understand and use rhetorical principles to produce public and private documents appropriate for academic andprofessional audiences and purposes: focus on a purpose; Text messaging respond to the needs of different audiences; respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations; use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation; adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality; Parking/driving use various technological tools to explore texts.•To practice good writing, including planning, revising, editing, evaluating sources, and working with others: develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading; Work/School/Family use writing as an open process that permits writers to revise their work; learn to critique their own and others’ works; learn the advantages and responsibilities of writing as a collaborative act.•To practice the processes of good reading: NCLB experience and use the many layers of meaning implicit in “texts”; interact with a text to question the ideas it presents and the language it uses; read and respond to written and visual texts; learn to proofread and edit documents for academic and professional audiences. Processed Food•To learn Web and digital environments valued by the university, for example, some or all of the following: Use the Internet as a research tool; Use word processing; Back-up files on disks, CDs, or jump drives; Student/Customer Service Send and receive e-mail; Enter discussion in chat rooms; Access Web CT or Vista.•To learn and practice how writing at the university is often based on previous research and inquiry and how to use thisresearch in writing: Use writing for inquiry, rather than merely reporting; Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources to support one’s own stance.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.Writing is a complex literacy task that consists of othercomplex literacy tasks.Writing is very connected to reading, thinking, attitude, life.We have the most difficult jobs on campus.
    • As writing faculty, we are not simply teaching writing. Weourselves are developing teachers of writing.I’ve been mired in Invention so long now that I am veryinterested in focusing my classes more on sentence-levelwriting issues.We don’t have time to do everything.Writing is a complex literacy task that consists of othercomplex literacy tasks.Writing is very connected to reading, thinking, attitude, life.We have the most difficult jobs on campus.We are misunderstood and undervalued.
    • Rehearsing New RolesLee Ann Carroll“Much of the story of cognitive development may beconstrued as taking progressively more variablesinto account during a single act of judgment.”Students’ performances as writers are constrainedas well as enabled by the circumstances of writingfor the college classroom.A limited version of literacy may constrain ratherthan enhance development.
    • Claims:•writing assignments in college required a high level ofcritical literacy•faculty are likely to underestimate how much writingtasks differ …•lessons learned in fywriting don’t directly transfer toareas of study•profs assigning a paper or two are unlikely to observestudent writing development•student literacy develops because they take on new anddifficult roles•student writing may need to get worse before it getsbetter
    • “It’s bad that you have to learnthe hard way,” learning as yougo, not knowing it all before youstart.
    • FYW is one step in a longprocess of development—from birth throughadulthood.
    • Don’t be a missionary. Don’texpect to save anybody.
    • Students rarely were able toproduce perfect work.
    • When professors assign one paper, they oftensee what a student can’t do, especiallycompared to other students, but they don’t seethe writing in the context of the student’soverall development.
    • FYW provides intensive practice and a fewbasic insights about college literacy tasks thatstudents often can express but may finddifficult to apply.
    • Students can value writing that isn’t greatwriting but that represents significantlearning.
    • Students learn to write differently, but don’tfulfill the fantasy that they have learned andmastered an idealized version of academicwriting.
    • Academic writing usually means studentsaren’t rewarded for unpolished personalnarratives or polemics expressing opinions.
    • Students are wary of changing writingthat works and the idea that theirinstructor’s preferences arerepresentative of other academicreaders.
    • Awareness of different kinds ofwriting is evidence of growingrhetorical sophistication.
    • Metacognitive awareness is central todevelopment—different forms ofwriting, challenging literacytasks, practice writing, think rhetoricallyabout their performance as writers.
    • Other faculty think students need athorough review of grammar.
    • Schools won’t/can’t provideadequate funding.
    • Challenging assignments withoutmuch help: students can’t write.Expressive writing with positivecomments: students don’tdevelop.
    • FYW doesn’t fulfill the fantasythat student writing can befixed, and thus no further directinstruction will be necessary.
    • Tips from FYW that could include teachingof writing in other disciplines must fit thelocal environment and ways thesubcommunity is providing scaffolding fornovices. (What scaffolding is beingprovided? What is needed? How do writersdevelop?)Scaffolding—the help proficient learnersprovide those in the zone of proximaldevelopment.
    • Development occursslowly over time.
    • Every type of correction works forsome students, but no one typeworks for every student.
    • Take FYWriting seriously,but not too seriously.
    • Most writing coursescan be more challengingthan they are now.
    • Students often don’t seetheir development asimproving their writing.
    • It is helpful to thinkthrough all the things astudent must do tocomplete an assigned task.
    • Recommendations for Instruction1. Rethink assignments as literacy tasks, not writing assignments. Focus onwriting differently, not better.2. Conduct an audit of writing within academic majors and programs and fill in gapsin literary instruction.Students need to develop flexibility as writers. Intellectualagility. FYW doesn’t develop fantasy students who can write. Development occursslowly over time.3. Develop literacy tasks over a sequence of courses.4. Develop tasks that challenge students, even if finished products are less thanperfect. Balance between reporting and arguing is difficult for students tomaintain. Learning to read, research, and write has to be part of what it means to“know” a particular field.5. Providing scaffolding to support development by directly teaching disciplinespecific research and writing skills, using grading strategically to rewardimprovement, scheduling interim deadlines for longer projects, and requiringclassroom workshops, study groups, and teacher conferences.In most cases, papersstudents turn in are essentially first drafts.There is no revision for revision sake.We are all strategicabout revision.
    • Walk-through of CEL.
    • Questions to Consider:
    • Are you teaching writing?
    • What does it mean to teach writing?(Chapter 5: Analyzing Concepts)
    • What is your pedagogy, and why?
    • What message does your pedagogysend students about writing? (Thatit’s all about format? That ideasmatter? That they are developingthrough this class, otherclasses, and rhetorical situationsbeyond college?)
    • •How has CEL helped you?•How has CEL been an obstacle?•Should we use a custom version ofCEL? If so, what chapters/sectionswould we keep?•If you’d prefer a differenttext, which one (what kind) andwhy? (How will that make thingsbetter?)
    • How are you teaching CollegeWriting II?Where does CEL fit in?Did you use it effectively inCW2, or not?
    • Do you need more help, or lesshelp, from KSUG?
    • Should we discuss teaching writingmore? If so, how? when?
    • Walk-through For explanations, see “Description of CEL 2-12” handout.
    • Chapter 1: Inventing Ideas This important chapter helps students understand the rest of the book. It helps students think differently about writing and thinking in important ways.
    • Chapters 2-12• Invention Chapters• Common Intellectual Activities• The Development of Human Consciousness
    • Chapter 13: Research & Writing
    • Chapters 14 etc: Anthology
    • Chapters 2-12• Work through an Invention chapter per essay• Use text as a thematic reader (see xvii)• Other approaches? The Composition/Practice of Everyday Life While the text can be used as a thematic reader, the RHETORIC sections should not be ignored. For example, analysis, Public Resonance, Thesis, and Rhetorical Tools sections are key to our students’ development as writers and thinkers.
    • Opening Image
    • Chapter TOC• Readings• Invention
    • Chapter Introduction• is an opening Essay• is an argument about the relevance and importance of the chapter’s common intellectual activity (remembering, explaining relationships, observing, analyzing concepts, etc)
    • Readings• Professional Essay• Commissioned Essay• Student Essay• (Annotated)• Writing Strategies• Exploring Ideas• Ideas for Writing
    • POC
    • Analysis• Invention• Invention Questions• Examples of Invention Writing• Discussion of Invention• Invention Workshops• Thinking Further
    • Public Resonance• Invention• Through POC, Analysis, and Public Resonance, students don’t just pick a topic or come up with a thesis. They INVENT a writing idea, a focused point, and support.
    • Thesis
    • Rhetorical Tools• Chapter 7, pages 228-9 (Fourth Edition)
    • Organizational Strategies, Writer’s Voice, Vitality, Peer Review, and Delivery
    • Questions•Are you teaching writing? What does it mean to teach writing?•What is your pedagogy, and why?•What message does your pedagogy send students about writing?•How has CEL helped you?•How has CEL been an obstacle?•Should we use a custom version of CEL? If so, what chapters/sectionswould we keep?•If you’d prefer a different text, which one (what kind) and why? (How willthat make things better?)•How are you teaching College Writing II?•Where does CEL fit in?•Did you use it effectively in CW2, or not?•Do you need more help, or less help, from KSUG?•Should we discuss teaching writing more? If so, how? when?