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Video Instruction

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A history of video instruction from past to present.

A history of video instruction from past to present.


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  • 1. Video Instruction From Past to Present Jennifer Witschy
  • 2. 1902
    • First educational films invented
    • Early films adapted from newsreels
  • 3. 1911
    • Thomas Edison produced the first historical film to be shown in a classroom
    • It was called The Minute Men
  • 4. 1912
    • Early portable 16mm film projectors became available
  • 5. 1914
    • Educational Motion Pictures Bureau issues teaching syllabi with educational films
  • 6. 1919
    • Society for Visual Education formed to produce films specifically for school use
  • 7. 1928
    • Eastman Teaching Pictures formed, ultimately creating 250 silent educational films
    • Phonodisc, the earliest video technology, invented by John Logie Baird of Glasgow, Scotland, the inventor of mechanical television
  • 8. 1929
    • Electrical Research Products, a subsidiary of Western Electric, added sound to educational films
    • Follow the link to see a newsreel with sound:
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovvv3d3JliY
  • 9. 1930s
    • Federal Government produced educational films
  • 10. 1933
    • American Council on Education began the Motion Picture Project to study the use of instructional films
  • 11. 1940s
    • Educational films for the war effort widely produced
  • 12. 1950s
    • Approximately 280 film libraries offered more than 6,000 educational film titles
  • 13. 1953
    • First educational film television stations began broadcasting
  • 14. 1960s
    • Open- and closed-circuit TVs carried educational programming to public schools, colleges, and universities
    • Videotape recording technology established
  • 15. 1967
    • Public Broadcasting Act established “public television” and created Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)
  • 16. 1970s
    • Children’s Television Workshop the dominant model for educational television programming
  • 17. 1978
    • Philip’s first video laser disc player produced
  • 18. 1984
    • First hi-fi VCR introduced
    • 8mm video recording available to the public
    • Sony Betacam video recording marketed
  • 19. 1987
    • Super-VHS and Sony Betacam SP video recording formats available
  • 20. 1990s
    • Digital video formats introduced
    • Conversion from analog began
  • 21. 1992
    • Microsoft Video for Windows version 1.0 optimized for capturing movies to disc
  • 22. 1997
    • DVDs and players commercially available
  • 23. 2000
    • Integrated, all-in-one digital video player software (e.g., Windows Media Player) widely available, for listening to music, hearing Internet radio stations worldwide, watching videos, and copying CDs
  • 24. Today
    • Digital video integrated into classroom activities and assessments
    • Schools may broadcast “daily news”