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Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher
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Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Designing and Teaching Online Learning. J.Boettcher

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Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Slides from 2011 Distance Learning conference in Madison WI August 3 2011. Orientation session Panel with Judith Boettcher

Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online. Slides from 2011 Distance Learning conference in Madison WI August 3 2011. Orientation session Panel with Judith Boettcher

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    • 1. 27th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning
      August 3 - 5 2011
      Ten Best Practices — A Quick Guide for Teaching Great Courses Online
      Judith V. Boettcher
      Designing for Learning
      University of Florida
      judith@designingforlearning.org
      1
      2011
    • 2. 2011
      2
      PRESENCE
      COMMUNITY
      PERSONALIZATION
      As in Vygotsky’s ZPD
    • 3. But, how will I “talk” to them?
      Do I really need to be on my course site every day?
      How do I know if they understand?
      But wait, I didn’t really mean that I would teach online
      “Help!” said with quiet desperation…
    • 4. 2011
      4
      Where did the Best Practices Come From?
      Community of Inquiry model Social, Teaching and Cognitive Presence
      Community of learners
      Idea of a University
      Garrison, Anderson, Archer, Swan, others
      John Henry Newman
      Instructional design and learning theory How People Learn reports
      Research on dialogue and communication Discussion as a way of teaching
      Bransford, Brown and Cocking
      Learner-centered Teaching…
      Brookfield and Preskill
      Maryellen Weimer
    • 5. Inspirations of Ten Learning Principles
      2011
      5
      Constructivism and active learning
      Zone of Proximal Development
      Lev Vygotsky
      Daniel Schacter
      Jerome Bruner
      Memory
      Experiential personalized learning
      Cognitive apprenticeship
      John Dewey
      John Seely Brown
    • 6. TEN BEST PRACTICES
      2011
      6
    • 7. 2011
      7
      Yes, every day!
      But you can “fence” that time…
      Be Present at the Course Site
      Best Practice 1
    • 8. 2011
      8
      “Is anyone out there?”
    • 9. The “Three Presences”
      The Three Presences based on Online Collaboration Principles by D. R. Garrison (2006) and article by Garrison, Anderson and Archer (2000)
      2011
      9
      Social Presence
      Teaching Presence
      Cognitive Presence
    • 10. 2011
      10
      Social Presence - Faculty
      Being a person, being "real" to your learners
      Social presence - the ability to project oneself socially and affectively in a virtual environment
      Some Ideas
      Picture — in context
      Short bio
      Favorite food
      Interesting stories
      How do you “make yourself known” to your students? As an expert, as a mentor, as a 3D person?
    • 11. First Week Forum: Social Presence and Trust among Learners
      Getting acquainted postings
      “My favorite movie, or book, or meditation or relaxation is….”
      Post one/more of their favorite pictures
      Pix of where they study/work/learn
      Describe their morning commute.. :-)
      Significant/favorite life experience related to the course
      11
      Useful in launching a “quick trust” among learners
      Elevator, cocktail openings, but deeper
      Chihuly Glass room at MFA last week
    • 12. Teaching Presence 1– What you do before the course…
      Syllabus
      Assessment plan with assignments and rubrics
      Course framework and communication plan
      Mini-lectures, concept intros with text, YouTube videos, podcasts
      Forum questions
      Project descriptions
      Core, recommended and personal choice resources
      Week-by-week schedule
      2011
      12
    • 13. Teaching Presence 2– Suggesting, Guiding, Challenging Showing the Way
      Group presences
      Announcements, reminders, guideposts
      Supportive, monitoring, questioning, affirming comments in the discussions and forums and blogs etc.
      Q&A sessions
      Individual presence
      Encouraging and shaping of individual and small team projects
      Individual feedback, support as may be appropriate
      2011
      13
      Three presences “ebb and flow” over a course (Akyol and Garrison, 2008)
      Note: "Teaching Presence" refers to the design, direction, facilitation and feedback, from a faculty in a course.
    • 14. Cognitive Presence
      Cognitive Presence - “Construction of meaning through sustained communication in a climate of trust.”
      2011
      14
      What are the zones, readiness points of your students?
      Not just “turn-taking” in the forums, but a give and take conversation
    • 15. First Week Forum: Cognitive Presence
      Customize learning goals
      Do I understand the learning outcomes of the course?
      What do the learning outcomes mean to me?
      How do I think that I will use the knowledge, skills, perspectives now and in the future?
      Arthur was preparing to become King.
      How will I personalize the learning outcomes?
      When I talk with my friends, family and other folks, how can I share what I am doing?
      15
      Who am I as a learner and why am I here?
    • 16. 2011
      16
      Best Practice 2
      Create a Supportive Online Course Community
    • 17. Balanced Dialogue Helps to Build Community
      2011
      17
      Too much faculty talk and direction
      Balanced communication of dialogue of mentor to learner, peer to peer and learner to resource
    • 18. Members of a Community…
      “Share common joys and trials”(C. Dede, 1996)
      Share a sense of belonging, of continuity, of being connected to others and to ideas and values (T. J. Sergiovanni, 1994)
      Act within a climate of justice, discipline, caring, and occasions for celebration" (E. Boyer,1995)
      2011
      18
      Members of a learning community care about each other and their learning successes
    • 19. 2011
      19
      Where do I start? What do I do now? What do I do next?
      Best Practice 3
      Develop a set of clear expectations
    • 20. Best Practice 3: Develop a Set of Clear Expectations
      How you will communicate, how often and response times and methods
      How learners should be communicating and participating
      How much time do you design for learners to be “engaged” in content every week?
      Weekly guide and overview
      What is your "weekly rhythm?"
      2011
      20
      Are rubrics clear and purposeful?
      Is 6 hours a week enough?
    • 21. 2011
      21
      Best Practice 4
      Design in a variety of learning experiences
    • 22. Include Individual, Small and Large Group Learning Activities
      Online courses can be isolating and overwhelming
      Design opportunities for students to brainstorm and work through concepts and assignments with one or two or more fellow students.
      Small teams for complex case studies or scenarios
      Expert events make for great large group activities
      2011
      22
    • 23. 2011
      23
      Best Practice 5
      Design for synchronous and asynchronous experiences
    • 24. 2011
      24
      Best Practice 6
      Ask for Informal Feedback Early
    • 25. Such as…
      How is course going?
      What would help you if it were different?
      Invite suggestions, observations
      How early is early?
      15% of the way in to the course, second week of 15 week course
      Avoids problems of "postmortem" evaluations and "If I had only known!"
      2011
      25
      “I didn’t know that anyone cared.”
    • 26. 2011
      26
      Best Practice 7
      Prepare Inviting, Challenging Discussion Posts
    • 27. Characteristics of Great Posting Questions
      Encourage exploration and research
      Encourage links to local, regional, personal life experiences
      Socratic-type probing and follow-up questions
      Why do you think that?
      What is your reasoning?
      Is there an alternative strategy?
      Ask clarifying questions that encourage students to think about what they know and don't know
      2011
      27
      A high priority “online skill”
    • 28. End of Week Discussion “Wraps”
      Discussion wraps aid reflecting and pruning processes of learning
      Students might otherwise drift with questions such as …
      What was that all about?
      Where has this conversation taken me? Taken our group?
      What have I learned? What do I know now that I did not know before?
      Have I changed how I think about these ideas or problem?
      What does our faculty leader think? Students want to know.
      2011
      28
    • 29. Best Practice 8
      2011
      29
      Design for Digital Resources and Tools for Core Concepts and Experiences
      "If content and tools are not digital, it is as if it does not exist for today’s learners"
    • 30. Why Digital Resources, Tools Are Essential…
      Visualize where learners are going to be…they can be anywhere, anytime and often while they are doing other things
      Learners want to be creative, such as making movies, podcasts, research, collect data
      Design for learners to research and identify resources that support learning of core concepts — for themselves and others
      2011
      30
    • 31. 2011
      31
      “I think I can…I think I can…
      Best Practice 9
      Combine Core Concepts with Customized Learning
    • 32. Four Layers of Content
      Core Concepts
      and Principles
      Core Concepts
      and Principles
      Applying Core Concepts
      Problem Analysis and Solving
      Customized and Personalized
      32
      2011
    • 33. 2011
      33
      Best Practice 10
      Plan a Good Closing and Wrap for Your Course
    • 34. Wrapping Up
      • Reflection activities
      • 35. Project sharing “beyond the course”
      • 36. Summarize/Debrief
      • 37. Concept mapping captures course content
      • 38. Look to the future – what might work better?
      • 39. Agree on “Big Ideas, Big Connections”
      • 40. Celebrate!
      2011
      34
    • 41. Conclusion Very Important Guideline
      2011
      35
      In course design, we design for the probable, expected learner; in course delivery, we flex the design to the specific, particular learners within a course.
      “I really enjoyed the project and how my teacher supported me in doing what was important for me personally.”
    • 42. 36
      Class of 2027
      Class of 2025
      Presence, Community and Personalization
      More resources …www.designingforlearning.info/services/writing/ecoach/tenbest.html
      judith@designingforlearning.org
      jboettcher@comcast.net

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