Copyright
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Copyright

on

  • 793 views

A presentation on copyright for journalism students, based extensively on the Student Press Law Center's "Student Media Guide to Copyright Law." ...

A presentation on copyright for journalism students, based extensively on the Student Press Law Center's "Student Media Guide to Copyright Law." http://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 I usually split this presentation across two class sessions, slides 1-30 one day, 31-42 the next.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
793
Views on SlideShare
793
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
36
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Copyright Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Copyright for Journalism Students 
  • 2. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, much less an expert in copyright law. This presenta?on draws extensively   from the Student Press Law Center’s   “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law” hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32   
  • 3. What do you think?  •  Can Drake Magazine download images of book jackets  from Amazon to include with book reviews?  •  Can the Times‐Delphic download an image of a  presiden?al candidate to accompany a news ar?cle? •  Can you use a company’s logo in your J70 blog post? •  Can Think online use a New York Times photograph? •  Can Duin create a parody of Newsweek called  Newsweak? •  Can DrakeMag.com post music videos on its site? •  Can Urban Plains create an ad for its site that includes  a picture of an iPad? 
  • 4. What is copyright? •   Authors, ar?sts have exclusive right to benefit  from their crea?ons •   Protected by federal law  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 5. What does copyright protect?  •  It protects:  –  Literary works  –  Sound recordings  –  Works of art  –  Musical composi?ons  –  Computer programs  –  Architectural works •  Work must be original  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 6. What can’t be copyrighted? •  Slogans (“Just do it”) •  Titles •  Names •  Words and short phrases •  Instruc?ons •  Familiar symbols, designs •  Facts, ideas •  U.S. government work  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 7. Who owns a copyright? •   Generally, the creator of the work •   “Work‐for‐hire” excep?on  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 8. How long does a copyright last? •  Anything created before 1923 is in “public  domain” •  For works created aaer 1973, copyright  expires 95 years aaer publica?on or 120 years  from crea?on, whichever comes first  Work is protected by copyright as  soon as it’s created  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 9. Work is protected by copyright  as soon as it’s created 
  • 10. Work is protected by copyright  as soon as it’s created 
  • 11. How long does a copyright last? •  Work is protected by copyright as soon as it’s  created  •  It doesn’t need the © 2006 by ______  •  It doesn’t need to say “copyright by ___” or  “all rights reserved”  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 12. In other words… … most everything you’ll want to  use is copyrighted.  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/ legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 13. Geeng permission  Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator   is not enough!  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 14. Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator   is not enough! 
  • 15. Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator   is not enough! 
  • 16. Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator   is not enough! 
  • 17. Got it?  Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator   is not enough! 
  • 18. Geeng permission •  Simply credi3ng the ar3st or creator is not  enough!  –  Don’t use “courtesy of” if the courtesy hasn’t  been formally extended to you •  Explicit permission is required. •  Start early (months ahead, not days or weeks) 
  • 19. The Big Excep?on:  FAIR USE “Fair use” allows limited use of copyrighted material  without permission. 
  • 20. FAIR USE is a gray area 
  • 21. In plain English, please? You may use  limited amounts of  copyrighted works  for news repor3ng and  educa3on  so long as its use does not  destroy the commercial  value of the work.   Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 22. * No, really, this is important .      * It’ll be on the test  
  • 23. In plain English, please? You may use  limited amounts of  copyrighted works  for news repor3ng and  educa3on  so long as its use does not  destroy the commercial  value of the work.   Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 24. In legalese:  Fair use: Four factors 1.  Purpose, character of use.   –  News repor?ng, teaching, cri?cism, commentary  likely to be “fair use” 2.  Nature of copyrighted work.  –  Factual material (maps, biographies) more likely  to be “fair use” than highly crea?ve, original  works (cartoons, novels)  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 25. Fair use? Four factors 3.  How much of original work is used  –  You may use no more than what is necessary 4.  Effect of use on commercial value of  copyrighted work  –  Most important factor  –  If consumers are likely to buy the use as  subs?tute for original, not fair use  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 26. What about slogans, symbols? •  Intellectual Property Law:  –  Copyright protects crea?ve works.  –  Patents protect inven?ons.  –  Trademarks protect symbols, slogans that iden?fy  businesses to their customers.  •  It’s OK to use trademarks when repor?ng  about a company 
  • 27. What about the Web? •    Yes, copyright law applies to the Web!   –  Images, documents, source code, music, podcasts,  ar?cles, videos, etc.  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 28. Online publishing guidelines •  Ignorance of copyright law is no excuse •  What is the purpose of your site?    –  News, educa?on = fair use  –  Other purposes ≠ fair use •  Publish excerpts, not en?re ar?cles  –  Quote briefly, properly aHribute, link to source •  Copyright is violated by using informa?on,   not by charging for it •  Freeware does not belong to you  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 29. Online publishing guidelines •  Assume everything is copyrighted •  Give proper credit  –  Photographs, ar?cles, etc.   –  Link to original source  –  When appropriate, let creator know you used it;  thank him/her •  To protect your own content:   –  © 2011 by [your name]  Source: Student Press Law Center  “Student Media Guide to Copyright Law”  hHp://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp?id=32 
  • 30. Where can I find images I can use? •  Free stock, or royalty‐free, photos   –  Stock.xchng  –  istockphoto.com  –  Digital Image Magazine’s  “25 Free Stock Photo Sites”  – Crea3ve Commons 
  • 31. Crea?ve Commons •  “Crea?ve Commons is a nonprofit corpora?on  dedicated to making it easier for people to  share and build upon the work of others,  consistent with the rules of copyright.” 
  • 32. The licenses   ABribu3on by: You let others copy,  distribute, display, and perform your  copyrighted work — and deriva?ve  works based upon it — but only if  they give credit the way you request. 
  • 33. The licenses   Share alike: You allow others to  distribute deriva?ve works only  under a license iden?cal to the  license that governs your work. 
  • 34. The licenses   Non‐commercial: You let others  copy, distribute, display, and perform  your work — and deriva?ve works  based upon it — but for non‐ commercial purposes only. 
  • 35. The licenses   No deriva3ve works: You let others  copy, distribute, display, and perform  only verba?m copies of your work,  not deriva?ve works based upon it.