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Importance of Water Treatment Sanitization
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Importance of Water Treatment Sanitization

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    Importance of Water Treatment Sanitization Importance of Water Treatment Sanitization Presentation Transcript

    • Specifying the Best Disinfection Technology Options inResidential/Commercial Applications Disinfection/Sanitization Procedures of Water Softeners & RO Units By: Justin Ramsey
    • Sanitization• Definition: The process • When to Sanitize of killing pathogenic – Well Water organisms or rendering Contamination them inert. – Boil Water Advisory – Mosbys Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. © 2009, Elsevier. – Installation• EPA Standards: – During Service – Sanitizer: 99.9% Kill Rate – Disinfectant: 99.99% Kill Rate
    • Why Sanitize? Within distribution systems there exist points called cross-connections where nonpotable water can be connected to potable sources … Backsiphonage may be caused by a variety of circumstances, such as main breaks, flushing, pump failure, or emergency firefighting water drawdown. Backpressure may occur when heating/cooling, waste disposal, or industrial manufacturing systems are connected to potable supplies and the pressure in the external system exceeds the pressure in the distribution system … During incidents of backflow, these chemical and biological contaminants have caused illness and deaths. The number of incidents actually reported is believed to be a small percentage of the total number of backflow incidents in the United States. From 1981 to 1998, CDC documented 57 waterborne disease outbreaks related to cross connections, resulting in 9,734 illnesses. These include 20 outbreaks (6,333 cases of illness) caused by microbiological contamination, 15 outbreaks (679 cases of illness) caused by chemical contamination, and 22 outbreaks (2,722 cases of illness) where the contaminant was not reported.*Potential Contamination Due to Cross-Connections and Backflow and the Associated Health Riskshttp://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/tcr/upload/2007_05_18_disinfection_tcr_issuepaper_tcr_crossconnection-backflow.pdf
    • Why Sanitize? Within distribution systems there exist points called cross-connections where nonpotable water can be connected to potable sources … Backsiphonage may be caused by a variety of circumstances, such as main breaks, flushing, pump failure, or emergency firefighting water Nonpotable water can be connected to potable sources caused by waste drawdown. Backpressure may occur when heating/cooling, main breaks, flushing, pump failure, or emergency firefighting water to potable disposal, or industrial manufacturing systems are connected drawdown. supplies and the pressure in the external system exceeds the pressure in From distribution system … During incidents of backflow,to the 1981 to 1998, 57 waterborne disease outbreaks related these chemical and biological contaminants have caused illness and deaths. The number cross connections, resulting in 9,734 illnesses. The number of incidents actually reported is believed to be a small percentage to be a small percentage of the of incidents actually reported is believed total number of backflow incidents in the United States. From 1981 to 1998, CDC documented 57 waterborne disease outbreaks related to cross connections, resulting in 9,734 illnesses. These include 20 outbreaks (6,333 cases of illness) caused by microbiological contamination, 15 outbreaks (679 cases of illness) caused by chemical contamination, and 22 outbreaks (2,722 cases of illness) where the contaminant was not reported.*Potential Contamination Due to Cross-Connections and Backflow and the Associated Health Riskshttp://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/tcr/upload/2007_05_18_disinfection_tcr_issuepaper_tcr_crossconnection-backflow.pdf
    • Why Sanitize? From backflow incident records collected by EPA, the most common microbial contaminants and their potential health effects are listed below: – Shigella • The associated symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and convulsions (US EPA, 2002b). – E. coli • The most common effect is watery diarrhea, with some strains causing fever or dysentery. – Salmonella • Depending on the strain, health effects can include typhoid fever, gastroenteritis (salmonellosis) (Benenson, 1995), and septicemia (US EPA, 2002b) – Campylobacter jejuni • This bacteria can cause gastroenteritis with symptoms including bloody diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramping (US EPA, 2002b) – Giardia • Giardia are intestinal parasites that exist in natural waters in a nonreproductive stage (cysts). They can cause diarrhea, as well as vomiting, cramps, and bloating (US EPA, 2002b).*Potential Contamination Due to Cross-Connections and Backflow and the Associated Health Riskshttp://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/sdwa/tcr/upload/2007_05_18_disinfection_tcr_issuepaper_tcr_crossconnection-backflow.pdf
    • Why Sanitize? • Pierre Payment (University of Quebec) studied 600 families: 300 families had RO systems, and 300 families drank tap water. • End of the 18-month study, water from an unsanitized RO caused 10 times more illness than tap water • The bacteria levels were 100,000 per milliliter (ml) and higher
    • Why Sanitize?
    • Why Sanitize?
    • WQA & Sanitization • “Water must be considered as a food… water treatment equipment must be maintained in the same manner as would be required to safeguard the sanitary condition of any food.” • “Water treatment systems are susceptible to contamination from airborne, waterborne and human transmitted sources.” • “Only U.S. EPA registered chemicals should be used … to sanitize/disinfect water treatment equipment.”
    • Sanitization Market Research• Market Research performed Q1 of 2010• Surveyed 359 independent dealers• Spoke with several distributors, dealership owners, service men, trainers and magazine editors• Interviewed corporate dealer group buyers & trainers• Brief sampling of interviewees:
    • Research Results• 72% currently using chlorine• 57% of sanitizers are purchased outside of the WT channel• 63% are unsure that the system is properly sanitized when complete• 84% want an EPA certified sanitizer
    • Determining a Solution• 5 ¼% Chlorine Solution (50 ppm • Quaternary Ammonium (200 ppm concentration) concentration) – Requires only 2 minutes of – Sanitizes in just 60 seconds. contact time. Readily available Available in single-dose packets – Stains, corrosive to resin & – Non-corrosive, non-staining but membranes, smells, tastes & leaves an aftertaste if too much difficult to determine proper is used dosage due to continual gassing off of the Chlorine • Iodine (12.5 ppm)• Hydrogen Peroxide (3, 7, or 35%) – Sanitizes in 15 minutes (30,000 ppm concentration) – Liquid stains just about – Requires 3 hours of contact time everything it comes in contact – Scentless & tasteless but with requires 3 hours & difficult to determine proper dosage
    • Determining a Solution• CHLOROX • IODINE TABLETS "Dear Mr. Ramsey, "Our Potable Aqua water [Sanitizing water softeners purification tablets are is] actually not a use for NOT INTENDED TO BE which weve tested our USED TO SANITIZE WATER Clorox Regular Bleach, so SOFTENERS. They cannot you may want to check be used for this with the water softener purpose. They are manufacturer and see if regulated by the FDA for they offer an alternative the purpose of purifying (for sanitization)." water only."
    • Determining a Solution• 5 ¼% Chlorine Solution (50 ppm • Quaternary Ammonium (200 ppm concentration) concentration) – Requires only 2 minutes of – Sanitizes in just 60 seconds. contact time. Readily available Available in single-dose packets – Stains, corrosive to resin & – Non-corrosive, non-staining but membranes, smells, tastes & leaves an aftertaste if too much difficult to determine proper is used dosage due to continual gassing off of the Chlorine • Iodine (12.5 ppm)• Hydrogen Peroxide (3, 7, or 35%) – Sanitizes in 15 minutes (30,000 ppm concentration) – Liquid stains just about – Requires 3 hours of contact time everything it comes in contact – Scentless & tasteless but with requires 3 hours & difficult to determine proper dosage
    • How to SanitizeWater Softeners – two easy steps One: Open and pour the entire contents of the packet into the brine well. If no brine well is present, pour contents into the bottom of brine tank when salt is nearly empty. Two: Manually regenerate softener according to manufacturer specifications. Regenerate again if necessary.
    • How to SanitizeReverse Osmosis Units – five easy steps One: Shut off water to RO unit. Remove membrane and filter or filters. Store in water to prevent damage. Two: Open pure water faucet and depressurize system.
    • How to SanitizeReverse Osmosis Units – five easy steps Three: Pour entire packet directly into first main housing unit. Make sure pure water faucet is closed and turn on water supply. Four: Allow system to fill with water. Flush system two times.
    • How to SanitizeReverse Osmosis Units – five easy steps FIve: Replace and re-install membranes and filter or filters.
    • Educating your Customer• Tell your customer you’re sanitizing the water treatment equipment and tell them why (best practice, safeguarding the customer, etc)• Explain the modest fee and point out the line item on the invoice• Attach an educational brochure to the invoice
    • Educating your Customer• Begin developing the "service mentality" with your customer by using service stickers & hangers Your Company Info Goes Right Here Your Company Info Goes Right Here
    • Questions?