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Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2
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Sport and Rec Social Media Workshop 2

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Slides from the second of three workshops on social media for local sporting organisations. Presented by DMA on behalf of ACT Sport and Recreation.

Slides from the second of three workshops on social media for local sporting organisations. Presented by DMA on behalf of ACT Sport and Recreation.

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Transcript

  • 1. ACT Sport and Recreation Social Media Workshop Series 2011 Workshop 2 – Social media opportunities and protection
  • 2. Welcome!
    • Let’s introduce ourselves
      • Name
      • Organisation
      • Position / responsibility
      • Give us your number 1 communication objective
      • Reflections from previous session
            • Demographics
            • Creating revenue
            • privacy
  • 3. Before we start
    • How Workshop 2 and 3 fit together
    • Workshop 3 will....
    • Be interactive on live terminals
    • Provide case studies of best practice
    • Respond to your direct sports’ need and offer examples and solutions
    • Workshop 2 is about....
    • Defining Social Media
    • Planning Strategic Communications
    • Building Protocols
  • 4. Agenda
    • Section 1 – social media opportunities
      • Workshop 1 re-cap
    • Section 2 – social media in context
      • Definitions
      • Developing a strategic approach to social media
    • Section 3 – managing risk
      • Protocols
      • Handling Social Media once implemented
  • 5. Defining Social Media
    • A brief history of social media
    Web 2.0 : The participatory, social & decentralised web (~2007-now) The new web empowers people to interact, generate and share multi-media content across the web, seamlessly. Moved from a solo activity to a series of participatory activities enabled by new web applications, platforms, technologies and methodologies. These platforms are accessible from multiple devices – the PC, netbooks, mobile phones, interactive TV, media players and gaming consoles. Social Media Athlete – Wirestone, via Slideshare
  • 6. Defining Social Media
    • Definitions of social media
    OBJECTIVE PLATFORM EXAMPLES Online Communities Facebook, LinkedIn, Google + Media Sharing YouTube, Flickr, Instagram Micro-Blogging Twitter, Tumblr, Posterous, FourSquare Rating and Linking AddThis, DIGG, Bit.ly Broadcasting Email, MailChimp Others Twibbons
  • 7. Social Media – the landscape
    • The Best – September 2011
      • Facebook: 10,628,600 users
      • YouTube: 9.9mil unique views per month
      • Blogspot: 4.6m il unique views per month
      • WordPress: 2mil unique views per month
      • LinkedIn: 1.8mil unique views per month
      • Twitter: 1.6 mil unique views per month
      • Flickr: 1.3 mil unique views per month
    Via socialmedianews.com.au http://www.socialmedianews.com.au/social-media-statistics-australia-september-2011/" >Social Media Statistics Australia – September 2011 Used under Creative Commons License
  • 8. Social Media – what we didn’t cover
    • Integrated Campaigns
      • Ensuring cross-linking between platforms
    • SEO and SEM to increase visits
    • Facebook and other advertising platforms
    • Links to mobile and app development
    • Analytics on email, sms, applications and web and social platforms
  • 9. Social Media - demographics
    • Most stats are US based
    • Generally female participation in Facebook and Twitter sits around 52-56%
    • Both Twitter and Facebook have concentrated membership in the 18-45 age group with Facebook skewed to an older audience
  • 10. Social Media – the big guys
    • Facebook
      • The stats
        • 800 million users worldwide, half of whom log in daily
        • 2 billion pieces of content liked or commented on daily
        • 100,000 new users in Australia in the past month
        • 10 million users in total, aiming for 90% or population between 15-60
      • Why would you use it?
        • Build a fan base, promote events, run competitions
  • 11. Social Media – the big guys
    • Facebook – How is it used
  • 12. Social Media – the big guys
    • Twitter
      • The stats
        • Around 2 millions Australian users and growing
      • Why would you use it?
        • To follow people of interest to you
        • To create followers who read your messages
        • As a linking platform to your other material
        • To promote in real time and engage on outcomes
  • 13. Social Media – the big guys
    • Twitter
      • How is it used
  • 14. Social Media – the big guys
    • LinkedIn
      • The stats
        • 100 million global accounts
        • 2 million Australian accounts
      • Why would you use it?
        • Link to other professionals
        • Learn from like-minded groups
        • Promote activities
  • 15. Social Media – the big guys
    • LinkedIn
      • How it is used
  • 16. Social Media – specialist platforms
    • Flickr
    • Instagram
    • Foursquare
    • YouTube
    • Vimeo
    • Tumblr
    • Slideshare
    • UStream
  • 17. Social Media – the rest!
    • The new kid on the block - UPDATED
      • Google+
        • Set up a Google+ account to encourage a community of followers to endorse you
        • Ensure that your organisation is visible in personal search results
        • Use the Hangout (live video) to connect with each other and stakeholders
        • Link to Google Places to promote your competition
  • 18. Defining Social Media
    • What would you / do you use?
      • Name the platform
      • Tell us about the objective
    • Exercise
    • Use the blank paper on your table to list
  • 19. Agenda
    • Section 1 – social media opportunities
      • Workshop 1 re-cap
    • Section 2 – social media in context
      • Definitions
      • Developing a strategic approach to social media
    • Section 3 – managing risk
      • Protocols
      • Handling Social Media once implemented
  • 20. Social Media in context
    • Business Objectives
      • Broadcast
        • Get messages out and get them out to more people than ever before; promotion direct to the public
      • Network
        • Reach stakeholders, athletes and volunteers and engage with them (virtually) face to face
      • Promote your brand
        • Stake a place in crowded markets
      • Internal Communication
        • Between small groups within your sport
  • 21. Building a Social Media Framework
    • Strategic Plan
    • Communication Objectives
    • Audiences
    • Platforms
    • Connection to other comms
    • Exercise
    • We move through the handout
  • 22. Social Media Framework
    • Give it a date
    • Get it approved
    • Version control it
  • 23. Social Media Framework
    • Link it to your strategic objectives right in the document
    • Draw the org chart IF it has some bearing on your comms
    • Think about the image you DON’T want to present
    EXAMPLE TEXT Goal: To develop our coaches, managers and other volunteers to be the best.
  • 24. Social Media Framework
    • Re-write your strategic objectives as communication objectives
    • Define how you measure success
    EXAMPLE TEXT Goal: To develop our coaches, managers and other volunteers to be the best. Objective: To ensure promotion of our expectations, link to available courses and to to facilitate shared learning between these groups .
  • 25. Social Media Framework
    • Define audiences even if you don’t end up using social to speak to them
    • Define their motivation to gauge the investment you should make trying to engage with them
    • Define a series of events you can tailor messages around
    EXAMPLE TEXT Audience: Coaches Life Events: Pre-Season, Training, Selections, Certification, Competition
  • 26. Social Media Framework
    • Commit to which platforms you will use
    • Set indicative timing so that you know when you are ‘publishing’
    EXAMPLE TEXT Platform: Email Activity: Contact Timing: Twice Weekly
  • 27. Social Media Framework
    • Link it to your other comms work
    • Allocate a resource!
    EXAMPLE TEXT Goal : To ensure promotion of our expectations, link to available courses and to to facilitate shared learning between these groups . Existing Channel : Club Email, National Federation Email, Private Coaching Websites Social Channel : Facebook Page Alignment: re-use of email messages on Facebook. Link in emails to event RSVP on Facebook
  • 28. Break
    • See you at 7.45
  • 29. Agenda
    • Section 1 – social media opportunities
      • Workshop 1 re-cap
    • Section 2 – social media in context
      • Definitions
      • Developing a strategic approach to social media
    • Section 3 – managing risk
      • Protocols
      • Handling Social Media once implemented
  • 30. Social Media – the risks
  • 31. What are your concerns?
    • Athletes
    • Brand
    • Sponsorship
    • Corruption / Gamesmanship
    • Team dynamic
    • Privacy
    • Exercise
    • Open discussion
  • 32. What risks are worth managing
    • Individuals
      • Privacy
      • Defamation / Discrimination
    • Employees
      • Access
      • Usage
    • Records Management
    • The Sport
      • Controlling message and information
      • Managing debate
    • Records Management
      • Keeping a record
      • Others keeping a record
  • 33. Context for sport social policy
    • Organisations still understanding the area
    • Many larger sports and organisations moving into the space
      • Life saving
      • Swimming Australia
    • ACT requirements for funded organisations to have a Member Protection Information Officer can provide a platform
  • 34. The broader context
    • Even professional codes have different approaches
      • MLB: does not apply to players (but an electronic equipment policy does)
      • The FA: applies general code of conduct
      • NFL, NHL, NBA: Yes but mainly restricted to timing issues
      • AFL: in development but more detailed at club level
  • 35. Policy or Guideline
    • Policy – enforceable
      • Controls legal burden
      • Covers HR and other regulatory issues
      • Based on risk
    • Guidelines – suggestion
      • General pointers
      • Positive positioning of options
    • Are we actually resourced to:
      • Monitor
      • Manage compliance
      • Enforce
      • Promote
  • 36. Do they already exist?
    • Code of conduct
      • Most social media policies talk about the same elements as a code of conduct, they simple designate the channels in focus
    • Values and discipline within Constitutions
      • Or your general operating procedures
    • Fair use of technology policies
      • With a focus on mobile and social access
  • 37. Essential Elements
    • Link to ‘ code of conduct ’ benchmarks and educate as part of policy
    • Definition of policy audience and diff between public / private information
    • Statement of relevant legislative protections / limitations
    • Reminders about ownership of material
    • Summary of potential discipline / outcome
  • 38. Generic Protocol
    • The handout comprises two parts
      • The Surf Life Saving Australia Social Media Policy (case study)
      • Generic Policy Template
    • Exercise
    • Review the handout
  • 39.
    • What we like:
    • Provides a definition of social media and doesn’t limit the definition. Could probably use the term “user-generated content”
    • Defines the audience for the policy
    • Sets context around reputation
    • Defines what it DOES NOT relate to
    • Uses the term ‘Guiding Principles’
  • 40.
    • What we like:
    • Clear information about lack of anonymity and the link between the web and public information
    • Mentions brand and intellectual property in terms of respect but also firm guidance on the graphic brand marks
    • Covers off staff and member usage in one statement – simplicity
    • Demands written consent for the creation of any new SM presence
  • 41.
    • What we like:
    • Stipulates advertising (particularly ‘pop-up’) must be controlled
    • Reminds members and staff to respect privacy
    • Notes potential discipline but does not fall into the trap of defining it
    • Provides a links to the experts for support
  • 42. Other options
    • It’s recommended you develop this yourself, but…
  • 43. Social Media in Use
    • What needs to be in place besides a policy
      • Clear business ownership and processes
      • Publishing guidelines and timetable
      • Issues management plan
      • Resourcing
    • What can also help
      • Defined brand ‘voice’
      • Prepared responses
  • 44. Social Media in Use
    • Business ownership and publishing processes
      • Have a all presences signed off by designated officer
      • Have agreement on what can be shared
      • Have agreement on the level of response the business owner is comfortable with
      • Have contacts and process if something goes wrong
      • Have a triage of publishing timing
        • Which platform is first
  • 45. Social Media in Use
    • Issues management
      • First kind of issue
        • Those which fall under published guidelines (misuse, code of conduct violation)
          • Don’t respond through social media other than to moderate
          • Move them quickly, and privately, to formal disciplinary processes
          • Be public (as much as you can) about the outcome – not the actual exchange
          • Be aware of your responsibilities
  • 46. Responsibilities
    • Privacy (driven by Privacy Commissioner)
      • Privacy breaches are not just “hacks” honest mistakes can constitute a breach
      • There is no requirement under the Privacy Act to notify an individual but If there is a risk of harm due to private information being published you should contact the individual
    • Cyber Safety (driven by AFP)
      • Promote passwords
      • Don’t publish or respond to anything you wouldn’t say face to face
      • Encourage members to have ‘private’ profiles
      • Don’t on-send unqualified embedded links
      • Only accept friend requests from those you know or can trace
  • 47. Social Media in Use
    • Issues management
      • Second kind of issue
        • Those which come from outside your sphere of influence (visitors, friends or family of members)
          • Use non-confrontational pre-prepared responses
          • Moderate only if the interaction breaks publishing or legislative rules (defamation etc)
          • Seek to positively engage or take it offline
  • 48. Managing the Whine
  • 49. Social Media in Use
    • Brand ‘voice’
      • Friend
      • Trusted Advisor
      • Policeman
      • Salesperson
  • 50. Social Media in Use
    • Prepared response examples (friendly advisor)
    Scenario Response Request for further info “ Hi (insert name), if you follow this link you ’ ll get the information you are after. Thanks for dropping by (insert link) Question about detailed policy or individual circumstances “ Hi (insert name) can ’ t really answer that one here, contact us at (insert email address) and we ’ ll see what we can do ” Question about a public event “ Hi (insert name), the event you are asking about starts at (insert details of event) and there are still places. Go here to register (insert link)
  • 51. Wrap-up
    • Any questions or clarification?
    • Preview of next session
      • Practical application of the frameworks with SportsGeekHQ
    • Continue the conversation
      • Twitter #SportRecSM
      • Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ACTSRS
  • 52. Justin Barrie Principal Consultant 0423302814 @DMA_Canberra [email_address] Thanks and see you at Workshop 3!

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